Center for Uterine Fibroids

Rochester, MN, United States

Center for Uterine Fibroids

Rochester, MN, United States
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Johnson G.,University of Minnesota | MacLehose R.F.,University of Minnesota | Baird D.D.,U.S. National Institutes of Health | Laughlin-Tommaso S.K.,Center for Uterine Fibroids | Hartmann K.E.,Vanderbilt University
Human Reproduction | Year: 2012

BACKGROUND Previous research suggests the removal of uterine leiomyomata may improve ability to conceive. Most of this previous research was conducted in infertility clinics. We investigated the association between leiomyoma characteristics on time to pregnancy among women enrolled from the general population. METHODSWe enrolled a cohort study of women in early pregnancy. Participants retrospectively reported their time to conception. Leiomyomata characteristics were determined by first-trimester ultrasound. We used discrete time hazard models to estimate the effects of uterine leiomyomata on time to pregnancy. RESULTSIn this population of 3000 women, 11 (324) with one or more leiomyomata, we found no association between leiomyomata presence, type, location, segment or size on time to pregnancy. CONCLUSIONSThese results suggest that leiomyomata have little effect on time to pregnancy in this cohort of women. The study excluded women who had been treated for infertility, and this may have resulted in underestimation of the association. However, differences between our study and previous studies in specialty clinics may be, in part, attributable to differences between our community-recruited population of women and women receiving fertility care, as well as difference in leiomyomata size or type in women having myomectomies to treat infertility. © 2012 The Author.


Moore K.R.,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | Moore K.R.,National Health Research Institute | Smith J.S.,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | Laughlin-Tommaso S.K.,Center for Uterine Fibroids | Baird D.D.,National Health Research Institute
Fertility and Sterility | Year: 2014

Objective To investigate whether the previously reported inverse association between cervical neoplasia and uterine fibroids is corroborated. Design Cross-sectional analysis of enrollment data from an ongoing prospective study of fibroid development. Setting Not applicable. Patient(s) Self-reported data on abnormal Pap smear, colposcopy, and cervical treatment were obtained from 1,008 African American women ages 23-34 with no previous fibroid diagnosis and no reported history of human papillomavirus vaccination. Presence of fibroids was assessed at a standardized ultrasound examination. Intervention(s) None. Main Outcome Measure(s) The association between the three cervical neoplasia-related variables and the presence of fibroids was evaluated with logistic regression to estimate age-adjusted and multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (aORs). Result(s) Of the analysis sample, 46%, 29%, and 14% reported a prior abnormal Pap smear, colposcopy, and cervical treatment, respectively. Twenty-five percent had fibroids at ultrasound. Those reporting cervical treatment had a 39% (aOR, 0.61; 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.38-0.96]) reduction in fibroid risk. Weak nonsignificant associations were found for abnormal Pap smear and colposcopy. Conclusion(s) Although a protective-type association of cervical neoplasia with uterine fibroids seems counterintuitive, a causal pathway is possible, and the findings are consistent with two prior studies. Further investigation is needed on the relationship between fibroids and cervical neoplasia and human papillomavirus-related mechanisms. © 2014 by American Society for Reproductive Medicine.


PubMed | National Health Research Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Center for Uterine Fibroids
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Fertility and sterility | Year: 2014

To investigate whether the previously reported inverse association between cervical neoplasia and uterine fibroids is corroborated.Cross-sectional analysis of enrollment data from an ongoing prospective study of fibroid development.Not applicable.Self-reported data on abnormal Pap smear, colposcopy, and cervical treatment were obtained from 1,008 African American women ages 23-34 with no previous fibroid diagnosis and no reported history of human papillomavirus vaccination. Presence of fibroids was assessed at a standardized ultrasound examination.None.The association between the three cervical neoplasia-related variables and the presence of fibroids was evaluated with logistic regression to estimate age-adjusted and multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (aORs).Of the analysis sample, 46%, 29%, and 14% reported a prior abnormal Pap smear, colposcopy, and cervical treatment, respectively. Twenty-five percent had fibroids at ultrasound. Those reporting cervical treatment had a 39% (aOR, 0.61; 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.38-0.96]) reduction in fibroid risk. Weak nonsignificant associations were found for abnormal Pap smear and colposcopy.Although a protective-type association of cervical neoplasia with uterine fibroids seems counterintuitive, a causal pathway is possible, and the findings are consistent with two prior studies. Further investigation is needed on the relationship between fibroids and cervical neoplasia and human papillomavirus-related mechanisms.


Bouwsma E.V.A.,Center for Uterine Fibroids | Bouwsma E.V.A.,Mayo Medical School | Hesley G.K.,Center for Uterine Fibroids | Hesley G.K.,Mayo Medical School | And 8 more authors.
Fertility and Sterility | Year: 2011

Objective: To present the rationale, design, and methodology of the Fibroid Interventions: Reducing Symptoms Today and Tomorrow (FIRSTT) study. Design: Randomized clinical trial. Setting: Two academic medical centers. Patient(s): Premenopausal women with symptomatic uterine fibroids. Intervention(s): Participants are randomized to two U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved minimally invasive treatments for uterine leiomyomas: uterine artery embolization and magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound. Main Outcome Measure(s): The primary endpoint is defined as the need for an additional intervention for fibroid symptoms following treatment. Secondary outcomes consist of group differences in symptom alleviation, recovery trajectory, health-related quality of life, impairment of ovarian reserve, treatment complications, and the economic impact of these issues. Result(s): The trial is currently in the phase of active recruitment. Conclusion(s): This randomized clinical trial will provide important evidence-based information for patients and health care providers regarding optimal minimally invasive treatment approach for women with symptomatic uterine leiomyomas. Clinical Trial Registration: NCT00995878. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Published by Elsevier Inc.


To present the rationale, design, and methodology of the Fibroid Interventions: Reducing Symptoms Today and Tomorrow (FIRSTT) study.Randomized clinical trial.Two academic medical centers.Premenopausal women with symptomatic uterine fibroids.Participants are randomized to two U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved minimally invasive treatments for uterine leiomyomas: uterine artery embolization and magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound.The primary endpoint is defined as the need for an additional intervention for fibroid symptoms following treatment. Secondary outcomes consist of group differences in symptom alleviation, recovery trajectory, health-related quality of life, impairment of ovarian reserve, treatment complications, and the economic impact of these issues.The trial is currently in the phase of active recruitment.This randomized clinical trial will provide important evidence-based information for patients and health care providers regarding optimal minimally invasive treatment approach for women with symptomatic uterine leiomyomas.NCT00995878.

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