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Ongenae F.,Ghent University | Ackaert A.,Ghent University | De Turck F.,Ghent University | Jacobs A.,Free University of Brussels | And 3 more authors.
2010 4th International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare, Pervasive Health 2010

The ultimate ambient intelligent care room environment would be able to sense the needs and preferences of the patients and nurses and adapt itself accordingly. This implies an emerging demand for the integration and exploitation of heterogeneous information available from different technologies. Nowadays, the nurse is responsible for orchestrating all these technologies, which slows down the adoption rate. In this paper, a context-aware, ambient aware and pervasive framework is proposed that tackles this integration problem by using an ontology. Rules, defined on top of this ontology, implement algorithms to optimize and automate care tasks. To increase the acceptance of the new technology, a user-driven development process is used which involves the stakeholders in every step of the design of the ontology and algorithms. To make the framework adaptable to future needs, a self-learning component is introduced that detects trends in the execution of the Rules and adapts the system accordingly. Source

Slegers K.,Center for User Experience Research | Van Boxtel M.P.J.,Maastricht University | Jolles J.,Maastricht University
Computers in Human Behavior

Cognitively challenging activities may support the mental abilities of older adults. The use of computers and the Internet provides divergent cognitive challenges to older persons, and in previous studies, positive effects of computer and Internet use on the quality of life have been demonstrated. The present study addresses two research aims regarding predictors of computer use and the relationship between computer use and changes in cognitive abilities over a 6-year period in both younger (24-49 years) and older adults (older than 50 years). Data were obtained from an ongoing study into cognitive aging: the Maastricht Aging Study, involving 1823 normal aging adults who were followed for 9 years. The results showed age-related differences in predictors of computer use: the only predictor in younger participants was level of education, while in older participants computer use was also predicted by age, sex and feelings of loneliness. Protective effects of computer use were found for measures of selective attention and memory, in both older and younger participants. Effect sizes were small, which suggests that promotion of computer activities in older adults to prevent cognitive decline may not be an efficient strategy. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source

Calvi L.,Center for User Experience Research | Jans G.,Center for User Experience Research
International Journal of Web Based Communities

Virtual or online content creation is no longer an external process done by software developers or professional new media players, but is more and more performed by ordinary people. In this paper, we focus on non-professional users to present how different categories of users get involved in the process of content sharing and creation within a city community. That only a few of them are interested in contributing to this community is nothing new in itself. Instead, we want to look at what is needed to encourage them to help us build up a virtual ‘replica’ of the city using an ad hoc application, i.e., the A4MC-application. To support them in achieving this goal, this mobile city device must have some iterative elements (like tags, ratings, comments, etc., which are also known as social features) that stimulate users to become active members of that particular community. By exploring which of these interactive elements are most suitable on mobile devices, we hope to define a framework to support users in generating content in a user-friendly way. © 2010 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. Source

Ongenae F.,Ghent University | Duysburgh P.,Free University of Brussels | Sulmon N.,Center for User Experience Research | Verstraete M.,Center for User Experience Research | And 6 more authors.
Applied Ontology

Ontology engineering methodologies tend to emphasize the role of the knowledge engineer or require a very active role of domain experts. In this paper, a participatory ontology engineering method is described that holds the middle ground between these two 'extremes'. After thorough ethnographic research, an interdisciplinary group of domain experts closely interacted with ontology engineers and social scientists in a series of workshops. Once a preliminary ontology was developed, a dynamic care request system was built using the ontology. Additional workshops were organized involving a broader group of domain experts to ensure the applicability of the ontology across continuous care settings. The proposed method successfully actively engaged domain experts in constructing the ontology, without overburdening them. Its applicability is illustrated by presenting the co-created continuous care ontology. The lessons learned during the design and execution of the approach are also presented. © 2014 - IOS Press and the authors. Source

Vandenberghe B.,Center for User Experience Research | Geerts D.,Center for User Experience Research
TEI 2016 - Proceedings of the 10th Anniversary Conference on Tangible Embedded and Embodied Interaction

In this paper we present the ongoing work on the Speaker's Staff, a concept for a tangible user interface to support remote multidisciplinary team meetings in hospitals. We describe the design process of the Speaker's Staff and our research-through-design approach, inspired by critical design, to overcome contextual barriers. By introducing the Speaker's Staff: we don't require tight integration with hospital informatics, we maximize flexibility for physicians in this dynamic environment, and we address the lack of mobile devices during these meetings. In four scenarios, we illustrate the possibilities of the Speaker's Staff: tilting to request the floor, hiding to signal absence, striking to thump the table, and tapping to acknowledge. Also, as the hospital can be a rather restrictive environment for HCI researchers, we argue that the Speaker's Staff supports our research in this context because the object makes our research questions tangible towards physicians. Copyright is held by the owner/author(s). Source

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