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Lorence D.,Center for Technology Assessment | Wu J.,Center for Technology Assessment
Journal of Medical Systems | Year: 2012

Disease identification in public health monitoring routinely employs analyte detection systems capable of discriminating mixtures of analytes, toxins, cells and/or bacteria in medical and/or environmental solutions. The development of smart sensors capable of discriminating such compounds has become increasingly important for clinical, environmental, and health applications. While some sensors have been fashioned for single analyte detection, methods and systems that facilitate rapid screening of multiple clinical components are needed, serving as triggers for potential epidemics or more specific confirmatory testing. In public health applications, there is like need for immediate collection of geocoded data tagged by disease identification characteristics, with corresponding alerting capabilities. In this technology review we propose one promising model for using a combination of emerging systems-based technologies in multi sensor cartridges, integrated with GPS-enabled, alert-capable mobile phone devices. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. Source


Lorence D.,Center for Technology Assessment | Wu L.F.,Center for Technology Assessment
Journal of Medical Systems | Year: 2012

Recent US health reform initiatives now require extensive consumer involvement through healthcare purchasing exchanges. The opportunity exists to monitor and plan for peak service needs in such an environment. The use of computational systems and methods for health services planning and utilization review have traditionally been employed in post-facto or financial analysis settings. In this technology review we propose one innovative model and attribute-based method that collects and analyzes indicators of consumers or patients within a defined network, accepts sensor data about individuals, and presents a set of health care service options at least partially based on the acceptance of indications of member attributes as well as sensor data about network actors. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011. Source


Lorence D.,Center for Technology Assessment | Chin J.,Center for Technology Assessment | Richards M.,Center for Technology Assessment
Journal of Medical Systems | Year: 2010

Goal Two of the US ONCHIT Plan focuses on enabling the use of electronic health information for critical health improvement activities that promote the health of targeted communities, and the US population as a whole. Because of the focus on communities and populations, the activities under this second goal differ fundamentally from those of the first goal, which focus on the care of individuals. Proposed here is a model for health information management in such population-based environments, which allows selective access and use of information, and maintains transportability while ensuring security and confidentiality. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. Source


Jameson R.,Center for Technology Assessment | Lorence D.,Center for Technology Assessment | Lin J.,Center for Technology Assessment
Journal of Medical Systems | Year: 2012

Monitoring of blood glucose levels is important to persons with diabetes or pre-diabetic, abnormal glucose indications. Such individuals must determine when insulin is needed to reduce glucose levels in their bodies, or when additional glucose must be administered to raise levels. A conventional technique used by many diabetics to personally monitor their glucose level includes the periodic drawing of blood, the application of blood to a test strip, and determination of blood glucose level using calorimetric, electrochemical, or photometric detection. This technique does not permit continuous or automatic monitoring of levels in the body, but typically must be performed manually, and on a periodic basis. Unfortunately, checking consistency varies widely among individuals, where wide variation of high or low levels of glucose or other analytes may have detrimental effects. The ongoing capture of data through continuous and/or automatic in vivo monitoring of analyte levels, and its inclusion with a user-friendly computer interface, is now possible using a subcutaneous implanted sensor. Such devices are small and comfortable when used, allowing a wide range of life activities. In this technology review we propose one promising model using a combination of emerging, systems-based technologies in non-invasive analyte monitoring, as integrated within household-based health monitoring using home appliances. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. Source

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