Center for Systems Engineering

Surrey, United Kingdom

Center for Systems Engineering

Surrey, United Kingdom
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Emes M.R.,Center for Systems Engineering | Bryant P.A.,Logica | Wilkinson M.K.,Atkins | King P.,Gloucester Business Park | And 2 more authors.
Systems Engineering | Year: 2012

The UK Chapter of the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE UK) commissioned research to illustrate the variety of usage of the terms architecture and architecting in the systems engineering community. These terms, though widely used, are rarely strictly defined, and the meaning attributed to the terms is not consistent even in formal publications. Using soft systems methodology, this research has analyzed three published sources (MODAF [http://www.modaf.org.uk, 2008], The Art of Systems Architecting by Maier and Rechtin [CRC Press, 2009], and ISO/IEC 42010 [2011]), and conducted a series of interviews with systems architecting practitioners. This research was set in context by a historical review of the use of the term systems architecting. Twelve contentious questions in systems architecting are discussed, and six perspectives on systems architecting presented, including three basic worldviews of the relationship between systems engineering and systems architecting. One model sees systems architecting as simply a rebranding of systems engineering to broaden its appeal with no change in content. Another model sees systems engineering restricted to its traditional processes, with systems architecting adding to systems engineering through external processes. The final model, and the most popular among the systems engineering community surveyed, sees systems architecting addressing shortcomings in traditional sequential lifecycle models by stretching the content of systems engineering to include new elements under the banner of systems architecting. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Wilkinson M.,Atkins | King P.,Gloucester Business Park | James A.,Center for Systems Engineering | Emes M.,Center for Systems Engineering | Bryant P.,Logica
2010 5th International Conference on System of Systems Engineering, SoSE 2010 | Year: 2010

Architecting has become an important discipline within the broader context of systems engineering. The lack of a common understanding of the discipline amongst practitioners and other stakeholders, particularly in broad communities, can result in confusion, misunderstanding and inefficiencies. Methods and principles from the Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) are used to define a method for investigating different approaches to systems and system of systems architecting, which we characterize as distinct 'belief systems'. This method is applied to a number of such 'belief systems' encountered in applied systems architecting with the aim of clarifying their key features and promoting mutual understanding across different architecting communities. © 2010 IEEE.


Emes M.R.,Center for Systems Engineering | Smith A.,Center for Systems Engineering | James A.M.,Center for Systems Engineering | Whyndham M.W.,Center for Systems Engineering | And 2 more authors.
22nd Annual International Symposium of the International Council on Systems Engineering, INCOSE 2012 and the 8th Biennial European Systems Engineering Conference 2012, EuSEC 2012 | Year: 2012

Based on 45 years of experience conducting research and development into spacecraft instrumentation and 13 years' experience teaching Systems Engineering in a range of industries, the Mullard Space Science Laboratory at University College London (UCL) has identified a set of guiding principles that have been invaluable in delivering successful projects in the most demanding of environments. The five principles are: 'principles govern process', 'seek alternative systems perspectives', 'understand the enterprise context', 'integrate systems engineering and project management', and 'invest in the early stages of projects'. A common thread behind the principles is a desire to foster the ability to anticipate and respond to a changing environment with a constant focus on achieving long-term value for the enterprise. These principles are applied in space projects and have been spun-out to non-space projects (primarily through UCL's Centre for Systems Engineering). They are also embedded in UCL's extensive teaching and professional training programme. © 2012 by Author Name.


Emes M.R.,Center for Systems Engineering | Smith A.,Center for Systems Engineering | Marjanovic-Halburd L.,University College London
Intelligent Buildings International | Year: 2012

Construction projects are becoming ever more ambitious in terms of the size of structures, the number of requirements, the number and influence of stakeholders and the extent to which technology is integrated into buildings. Although great buildings may historically have been designed and built by a single guiding mind - 'the architect' - modern buildings require teams of specialists to work together to develop ideal solutions. In these circumstances, to ensure that construction projects are delivered on time, to budget and to the requirements specified by the customer, the construction industry could benefit from adopting a systems' engineering approach to design. Based on 45 years of spacecraft instrumentation research and development and over 10 years experience teaching Systems Engineering in a range of industries, University College London's (UCL's) Mullard Space Science Laboratory has identified a set of guiding principles that have been found to be critical in delivering successful projects in the most demanding of environments. The five principles are: 'principles govern processes', 'seek alternative systems perspectives', 'understand the enterprise context', 'integrate systems engineering and project management' and 'invest in the early stages of projects'. Underlying these principles is a will to anticipate and respond to a changing environment with a focus on achieving long-term value for the enterprise. These principles are applied in both space projects and nonspace projects (through UCL's Centre for Systems Engineering), and are embedded in UCL's teaching and professional training programme. These principles could contribute to the successful delivery of complex building projects. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

Loading Center for Systems Engineering collaborators
Loading Center for Systems Engineering collaborators