Center for Sports and Exercise Medicine

London, United Kingdom

Center for Sports and Exercise Medicine

London, United Kingdom
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Rompe J.D.,OrthoTrauma Evaluation Center | Cacchio A.,San Salvatore Hospital of lAquila | Furia J.P.,SUN Orthopaedics | Maffulli N.,Center for Sports and Exercise Medicine
American Journal of Sports Medicine | Year: 2010

Background: Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is a pain syndrome along the tibial origin of the tibialis posterior or soleus muscle. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (SWT) is effective in numerous types of insertional pain syndromes. Hypothesis: Shock wave therapy is an effective treatment for chronic MTSS. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Forty-seven consecutive subjects with chronic recalcitrant MTSS underwent a standardized home training program, and received repetitive low-energy radial SWT (2000 shocks; 2.5 bars of pressure, which is equal to 0.1 mJ/mm2; total energy flux density, 200 mJ/mm2; no local anesthesia) (treatment group). Forty-seven subjects with chronic recalcitrant MTSS were not treated with SWT, but underwent a standardized home training program only (control group). Evaluation was by change in numeric rating scale. Degree of recovery was measured on a 6-point Likert scale (subjects with a rating of completely recovered or much improved were rated as treatment success). Results: One month, 4 months, and 15 months from baseline, success rates for the control and treatment groups according to the Likert scale were 13% and 30% (P <.001), 30% and 64% (P <.001), and 37% and 76% (P <.001), respectively. One month, 4 months, and 15 months from baseline, the mean numeric rating scale for the control and treatment groups were 7.3 and 5.8 (P <.001), 6.9 and 3.8 (P <.001), and 5.3 and 2.7 (P <.001), respectively. At 15 months from baseline, 40 of the 47 subjects in the treatment group had been able to return to their preferred sport at their preinjury level, as had 22 of the 47 control subjects. Conclusion: Radial SWT as applied was an effective treatment for MTSS.


Pollock N.,Hospital Of St John And St Elizabeth | Grogan C.,Center for Sports and Exercise Medicine | Perry M.,Center for Sports and Exercise Medicine | Pedlar C.,English Institute of Sport | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism | Year: 2010

Low bone-mineral density (BMD) is associated with menstrual dysfunction and negative energy balance in the female athlete triad. This study determines BMD in elite female endurance runners and the associations between BMD, menstrual status, disordered eating, and training volume. Forty-four elite endurance runners participated in the cross-sectional study, and 7 provided longitudinal data. Low BMD was noted in 34.2% of the athletes at the lumbar spine, and osteoporosis in 33% at the radius. In cross-sectional analysis, there were no significant relationships between BMD and the possible associations. Menstrual dysfunction, disordered eating, and low BMD were coexistent in 15.9% of athletes. Longitudinal analysis identified a positive association between the BMD reduction at the lumbar spine and training volume (p = .026). This study confirms the presence of aspects of the female athlete triad in elite female endurance athletes and notes a substantial prevalence of low BMD and osteoporosis. Normal menstrual status was not significantly associated with normal BMD, and it is the authors' practice that all elite female endurance athletes undergo dual-X-ray absorptiometry screening. The association between increased training volume, trend for menstrual dysfunction, and increased loss of lumbar BMD may support the concept that negative energy balance contributes to bone loss in athletes. © 2010 Human Kinetics, Inc.


Aweid O.,Center for Sports and Exercise Medicine | Gallie R.,Center for Sports and Exercise Medicine | Morrissey D.,Center for Sports and Exercise Medicine | Crisp T.,BMI The London Independent Hospital | And 4 more authors.
Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy | Year: 2014

Purpose: Pressure algometry (PA) may provide an objective and standardised tool in assessing palpation pain over the tibia. The purpose of this study was to analyse the intra-rater repeatability of PA and to determine whether tibial tenderness in healthy runners differ from runners with medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). Methods: Pressure algometry was performed on 20 asymptomatic runners (40 legs) and 9 MTSS patients (14 symptomatic legs) at standardised locations along the medial border of the tibia. Intra-rater reliability was assessed in 10 randomly selected asymptomatic runners through repeated measurements 2 weeks later. Results: Intra-rater reliability was moderate to excellent (ICC 0.53-0.90) in asymptomatic runners. Pain pressure threshold (PPT) was significantly reduced at 2/9-5/9 of the distance from the medial malleolus to the medial tibial condyle (p = 0.002-0.022). There was evidence of a statistically significant association between both height and weight, and PPT from the 3/9 (r = 0.416, p = 0.008) to 7/9 (r = 0.334, p = 0.035) and 3/9 (r = 0.448, p = 0.004) to 6/9 (r = 0.337, p = 0.034) area, respectively. In both MTSS patients and healthy runners, there was evidence of lower PPT in females compared to males (p = 0.0001-0.049) and a negative association between age and PPT (p = 0.001-0.033). MTSS patients had significantly lower PPT at the 3/9 site (p = 0.048) compared to asymptomatic runners. Conclusion: Pain pressure threshold algometry can be incorporated into MTSS clinical assessment to objectively assess pain and monitor progress. The presence of reduced medial tibial PPT in asymptomatic runners suggests that clinicians may not need to await resolution of medial tibia tenderness before allowing return to sport in MTSS patients. Level of evidence: III. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Banfi G.,University of Milan | Botre F.,Sportiva | De La Torre X.,Sportiva | De Vita F.,Associazione Calcio Chievoverona | And 7 more authors.
Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine | Year: 2012

Laboratory medicine is complex and contributes to the diagnosis, therapeutic monitoring and follow-up of acquired and inherited human disorders. The regular practice of physical exercise provides important benefits in heath and disease and sports medicine is thereby receiving growing focus from almost each and every clinical discipline, including laboratory medicine. Sport-laboratory medicine is a relatively innovative branch of laboratory science, which can provide valuable contributions to the diagnosis and follow-up of athletic injuries, and which is acquiring a growing clinical significance to support biomechanics and identify novel genomics and "exercisenomics" patterns that can help identify specific athlete's tendency towards certain types of sport traumas and injuries. Laboratory medicine can also provide sport physicians and coaches with valuable clues about personal inclination towards a certain sport, health status, fitness and nutritional deficiencies of professional, elite and recreational athletes in order to enable a better and earlier prediction of sport injuries, overreaching and overtraining. Finally, the wide armamentarium of laboratory tests represents the milestone for identifying cheating athletes in the strenuous fight against doping in sports. © 2012 by Walter de Gruyter • Berlin • Boston.


Mostamand J.,Isfahan University of Medical Sciences | Bader D.L.,Queen Mary, University of London | Hudson Z.,Center for Sports and Exercise Medicine
Journal of Sports Sciences | Year: 2011

Although patellar taping has been shown to reduce pain in participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome, the mechanisms of pain reduction have not completely been established following its application. The purpose of this study was to evaluate EMG activity of vastus medialis and vastus lateralis following the application of patellar taping during a functional single leg squat. Both vastus medialis obliquus-vastus lateralis onset and vastus medialis obliquus/vastus lateralis amplitude of 18 participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome and 18 healthy participants as controls were measured using an EMG unit. This procedure was performed on the affected knee of participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome, before, during, and after patellar taping during unilateral squatting. The same procedure was also performed on the unaffected knees of both groups. The mean values of vastus medialis obliquus-vastus lateralis onset prior to taping (2.54 ms, s=4.35) were decreased significantly following an immediate application of tape (-3.22 ms, s = 3.45) and after a prolonged period of taping (-6.00 ms, s = 3.40 s) (P < 0.05). There was also a significant difference between the mean values of vastus medialis obliquus-vastus lateralis onset among controls (-2.03 ms, s = 6.04) and participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome prior to taping (P < 0.05). However, there were no significant difference between the ranked values of vastus medialis obliquus/vastus lateralis amplitude of the affected and unaffected knees of participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome and controls during different conditions of taping (P > 0.05). Decreased values of vastus medialis obliquus-vastus lateralis onset may contribute to patellar realignment and explain the mechanism of pain reduction following patellar taping in participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.


Furia J.P.,SUN Orthopedics and Sports Medicine | Rompe J.D.,OrthoTrauma Evaluation Center | Cacchio A.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Maffulli N.,Center for Sports and Exercise Medicine
Foot and Ankle Clinics | Year: 2010

Shock wave therapy (SWT) stimulates angiogenesis and osteogenesis. SWT is commonly used to treat soft tissue musculoskeletal conditions such as fasciopathies and tendinopathies. Recent basic science and clinical data suggest that SWT can also be used to treat disorders of bone. Nonunions, avascular necrosis, and delayed healing of stress fractures have all been successfully treated with SWT. Success rates with SWT are equal to those with standard surgical treatment, but SWT has the advantage of decreased morbidity. The procedure is safe, well tolerated, yields few complications, and, typically, can be performed on an outpatient basis. SWT is a viable noninvasive alternative to stimulate healing of bone. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


Longo U.G.,Biomedical University of Rome | Rizzello G.,Biomedical University of Rome | Loppini M.,Biomedical University of Rome | Locher J.,Biomedical University of Rome | And 4 more authors.
Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery | Year: 2015

Purpose To analyze outcomes of surgical and conservative treatment options for multidirectional instability (MDI). Methods A systematic review of the literature according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines was performed. A comprehensive search of the PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases using various combinations of the keywords "shoulder," "multidirectional instability," "dislocation," "inferior instability," "capsulorrhaphy," "capsular plication," "capsular shift," "glenoid," "humeral head," "surgery," and "glenohumeral," over the years 1966 to 2014 was performed. Results Twenty-four articles describing patients with open capsular shift, arthroscopic treatment, and conservative or combined management in the setting of atraumatic MDI of the shoulder were included. A total of 861 shoulders in 790 patients was included. The median age was 24.3 years, ranging from 9 to 56 years. The dominant side was involved in 269 (58%) of 468 shoulders, whereas the nondominant side was involved in 199 (42%) shoulders. Patients were assessed at a median follow-up period of 4.2 years (ranging from 9 months to 16 years). Fifty-two of 253 (21%) patients undergoing physiotherapy required surgical intervention for MDI management, whereas the overall occurrence of redislocation was seen in 61 of 608 (10%) shoulders undergoing surgical procedures. The redislocation event occurred in 17 of 226 (7.5%) shoulders with open capsular shift management, in 21 of 268 (7.8%) shoulders with arthroscopic plication management, in 12 of 49 (24.5%) shoulders undergoing arthroscopic thermal shrinkage, and in 11 of 55 (22%) shoulders undergoing arthroscopic laser-assisted capsulorrhaphy. Conclusions Arthroscopic capsular plication and open capsular shift are the best surgical procedures for treatment of MDI after failure of rehabilitative management. Arthroscopic capsular plication shows results comparable to open capsular shift. Level of Evidence Level IV, systematic review of Level I to IV studies. © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America.


Longo U.G.,Biomedical University of Rome | Loppini M.,Biomedical University of Rome | Rizzello G.,Biomedical University of Rome | Ciuffreda M.,Biomedical University of Rome | And 3 more authors.
Arthroscopy : the journal of arthroscopic & related surgery : official publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association | Year: 2014

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes, rate of recurrence, complications, and range of movement after remplissage, Weber osteotomy, humeral allograft reconstruction, shoulder arthroplasty, and hemiarthroplasty in patients with anterior or posterior shoulder instability associated with humeral bone loss.METHODS: A systematic review of published studies on the management of dislocation of the shoulder with humeral bony procedures was performed. A comprehensive search of the PubMed, Medline, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), Cochrane, Embase, and Google Scholar databases was performed using various combinations of the keywords "shoulder," "dislocation," "treatment," "remplissage," "hemiarthroplasty," "arthroplasty," "allograft," "osteotomy," "bone," "loss," "clinical," "outcome," and "Hill Sachs" since inception of the databases to 2014. The following data were extracted: demographic characteristics, bone defects and other lesions, type of surgery, outcome measurement, range of motion, recurrence of instability, and complications.RESULTS: Twenty-six studies were included, in which 769 shoulders were evaluated. The mean value of the Coleman Methodology Score was 69.2 points. Preoperatively, the most detected injuries were Hill-Sachs and Bankart lesions. Shoulder arthroplasty procedures had the highest rate of postoperative recurrence and the lowest scores for postoperative clinical outcomes. The combination of remplissage and Bankart procedures was associated with a lower rate of recurrence when compared with Bankart repair alone (odds ratio, 0.05; 95% confidence interval, 0.01 to 0.25; P = .0002). A high heterogeneity (I(2) = 85%) across the study results was found.CONCLUSIONS: Arthroscopic remplissage is the safest technique for the management of patients with shoulder instability with humeral bone loss. Remplissage-Bankart procedures are associated with a lower rate of recurrence when compared with Bankart repair alone. Weber osteotomy, humeral allograft reconstruction, shoulder arthroplasty, and hemiarthroplasty are characterized by a high rate of recurrence, complications, and poor outcome scores.LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, systematic review of Level II, III, and IV studies. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Longo U.G.,Biomedical University of Rome | Loppini M.,Biomedical University of Rome | Rizzello G.,Biomedical University of Rome | Ciuffreda M.,Biomedical University of Rome | And 4 more authors.
Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery | Year: 2014

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes, rate of recurrence, complications, and range of movement after remplissage, Weber osteotomy, humeral allograft reconstruction, shoulder arthroplasty, and hemiarthroplasty in patients with anterior or posterior shoulder instability associated with humeral bone loss. Methods: A systematic review of published studies on the management of dislocation of the shoulder with humeral bony procedures was performed. A comprehensive search of the PubMed, Medline, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), Cochrane, Embase, and Google Scholar databases was performed using various combinations of the keywords "shoulder," "dislocation," " treatment," "remplissage," "hemiarthroplasty," "arthroplasty," "allograft," "osteotomy," "bone," "loss," "clinical," "outcome," and "Hill Sachs" since inception of the databases to 2014. The following data were extracted: demographic characteristics, bone defects and other lesions, type of surgery, outcome measurement, range of motion, recurrence of instability, and complications. Results: Twenty-six studies were included, in which 769 shoulders were evaluated. The mean value of the Coleman Methodology Score was 69.2 points. Preoperatively, the most detected injuries were Hill-Sachs and Bankart lesions. Shoulder arthroplasty procedures had the highest rate of postoperative recurrence and the lowest scores for postoperative clinical outcomes. The combination of remplissage and Bankart procedures was associated with a lower rate of recurrence when compared with Bankart repair alone (odds ratio, 0.05; 95% confidence interval, 0.01 to 0.25; P = .0002). A high heterogeneity (I2 = 85%) across the study results was found. Conclusions: Arthroscopic remplissage is the safest technique for the management of patients with shoulder instability with humeral bone loss. Remplissage-Bankart procedures are associated with a lower rate of recurrence when compared with Bankart repair alone. Weber osteotomy, humeral allograft reconstruction, shoulder arthroplasty, and hemiarthroplasty are characterized by a high rate of recurrence, complications, and poor outcome scores. Level of Evidence: Level IV, systematic review of Level II, III, and IV studies. © 2014 by the Arthroscopy Association of North America


PubMed | Federal University of São Paulo, Center for Sports and Exercise Medicine and University of Sao Paulo
Type: | Journal: BMJ case reports | Year: 2015

Muscle rupture is rarely treated surgically. Few reports of good outcomes after muscular suture have been published. Usually, muscular lesions or partial ruptures heal with few side effects or result in total recovery. We report a case of an athlete who was treated surgically to repair a total muscular rupture in the pectoralis major muscle. After 6 months, the athlete returned to competitive practice. After a 2-year follow-up, the athlete still competes in skateboard championships.

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