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Milivojevic J.,Center for Small Grains of Kragujevac | Nikezic D.,University of Kragujevac | Krstic D.,University of Kragujevac | Dalovic I.,Serbian Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops
Polish Journal of Environmental Studies | Year: 2011

Sequential extraction for the determination of zinc forms in soil has been applied in order to enable clearer understanding of its mobility and availability for plants. Examinations were conducted on 20 samples of soil with different chemical and physical characteristics; plant uptake was followed on oats (Avena saliva L). A fractional scheme was applied with extraction of (I) water soluble and exchangeable adsorbed metals, (II) specifically adsorbed metals and metal bounded with carbonates, (III) reductant releasable Zn, which included Zn bonded to oxides not released in the previous step, and probably included Zn occluded in oxides, (IV) organically bonded, and (V) (residual fraction) metal structurally bonded in silicates. The majority of zinc is in residual fraction (V) (74.9% in field vertisols and 69% in meadow vertisols). Reductant releasable Zn occluded in oxides (III) is the second largest with higher values in meadows (22.2%) than in fields (17.5%). The content of zinc in organic matter (IV) is small (6.7%) in both types of soil. Specifically adsorbed zinc, and zinc bonded with carbonates (II) is low (0.1-3.1), while its' content in exchangeable fraction (I) is negligible and is about 0.2%. Exchangeable and specifically adsorbed zinc increased with the reduction of the pH of soil, CEC, clay and clay + silt, and with the increase of silt and sand. Zinc in the residual fraction increases with the pH of soil, clay, CEC, and clay + silt. The concentration of residual zinc was determined by mechanical fraction of clay.


Milosevic T.,University of Kragujevac | Milosevic N.,Fruit Research Institute Cacak | Milivojevic J.,Center for Small Grains of Kragujevac | Glisic I.,University of Kragujevac | Nikolic R.,University of Kragujevac
Scientia Horticulturae | Year: 2014

From 2008 to 2013 we investigate impact of Mazzard seedlings and Colt rootstock on tree growth, precocity, productivity, gross profit, fruit quality and leaf nutrients level of seven sweet cherry cultivars which are grown at Cacak region (Serbia) on heavy and acidic soil in high density planting system (HDP). Results showed that most of the evaluated traits significantly varied between rootstock and among cultivars. Thus, Mazzard induced higher tree vigor, yield performances, gross profit, flesh rate, fruit acidity, and leaf P and Mn levels, whereas Colt induced higher fruit weight, fruit dimensions, size and shape values, stone weight, ripening index and leaf N, Ca, Mg, Fe and Zn amounts. Regarding cultivars, 'Stark Hardy Giant' ('SHG') had the lowest tree vigor on both rootstocks, whereas the highest was induced by 'New Star' on Mazzard, and by 'Summit' and 'Lapins' on Colt. Generally, the highest values of yield attributes and financial results were found in 'Sunburst' on Mazzard and 'SHG' on Colt, whereas 'New Star' had the poorest. 'New Star' on both rootstocks, 'June Early' on Mazzard, and 'Lapins' on Colt were cultivars with the better fruit weight and other physical traits, whereas 'Hedelfinger' had higher soluble solids content (SSC) and acidity on both rootstocks as compared with others. 'New Star' grafted on Mazzard and 'Lapins' on Colt showed a tendency to promote higher RI. Cherries of trees grafted on Colt showed higher capacity to accumulate leaf N, Ca, Mg, Fe and Zn, whereas leaf of cherries on Colt had higher P and Mn amounts. High variability among cultivars regarding leaf nutrients content was found. Both rootstocks and all cultivars on them exhibited excessive leaf N and Cu levels, and high insufficiency of other leaf macro- and micronutrients. Colt showed better balanced nutritional values for macronutrients, whereas rootstock impact on this trait for micronutrients was not significant. 'SHG' on both rootstocks, in general, is the cultivar with the best balanced nutritional values as compared to others. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Milivojevic J.Z.,Center for Small Grains of Kragujevac | Dalovic I.G.,Serbian Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops | Jelic M.Z.,University of Kosovska Mitrovica | Trifunovic S.R.,University of Kragujevac | And 4 more authors.
Journal of the Serbian Chemical Society | Year: 2011

Soil samples taken from the Ap horizont of arable land and meadows at ten different localities were analyzed for different forms of manganese, including total (HF), pseudo-total (HNO3), 0.1 M HCl-extractable and diethylentriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable. A sequential fractional procedure was used for Mn portioning into fractions: water soluble and exchangeable Mn (I), specifically adsorbed Mn with carbonates (II), reductant releasable Mn in oxides (III), Mn bonded with organic matter (IV) and Mn structurally bonded in silicates (residual fraction) (V). Serbian vertisols have a normal Mn content, comparable with similar soils. The total (HF) and pseudototal (HNO3) Mn contents were not correlated with soil properties, whereas the humus content positively influenced the 0.1 M HCl-extractable Mn in soil (r = = 0.49). Soil pH and CaCO3 (r = 0.57 and 0.43) showed significant negative correlations with the DTPA-extractable Mn, respectively. The different extraction methods showed similar patterns of Mn content in arable and meadow soils. The sequential fractional procedure showed that reductant releasable Mn occluded in oxides of Fe and Mn was the prevailing Mn fraction in soil, however, water soluble and exchangeable Mn and Mn bonded with organic matter had significant correlations with most of the examined soil characteristics. Potential Mn toxicity in vertisols could be observed under lower pH and saturated conditions.


Jelic M.Z.,University of Kosovska Mitrovica | Milivojevic J.Z.,Center for Small Grains of Kragujevac | Trifunovic S.R.,University of Kragujevac | Dalovic I.G.,Serbian Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops | And 2 more authors.
Journal of the Serbian Chemical Society | Year: 2011

Soil of arable land and meadows from the Ap horizon, taken from ten different localities, were investigated for different forms of Fe, including total (HF), pseudo-total (HNO3), 0.1 M HCl extractable and DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid)-extractable. A sequential fractional procedure was employed to separate the Fe into fractions: water soluble and exchangeable Fe (I), Fe specifically adsorbed with carbonates (II), reducibly releasable Fe in oxides (III), Fe bonded with organic matter (IV) and Fe structurally bonded in silicates (residual fraction) (V). The soil pH, cation exchange capacity, and size fractions (clay and silt) had a strongest influence on the distribution of the different forms of Fe. The different extraction methods showed similar patterns of the Fe content in arable and meadow soils. However, the DTPA iron did not correspond with the total iron, which confirms the widespread incidence of irondeficiency in vertisols is independent of the total iron in soils. The amount of exchangeable (fraction I) and specifically adsorbed (II) iron showed no dependence on its content in the other fractions, indicating low mobility of iron in vertisols. The strong positive correlation (r = 0.812 and 0.956) between the content of iron in HNO3 and HF and its contents in the primary and secondary minerals (fraction - V) indicate a low content of plant accessible iron in the vertisol. The sequential fractional procedure was confirmed as suitable for accessing the content and availability of iron in the vertisols of Serbia.


Milivojevic J.,Center for Small Grains of Kragujevac | Krstic D.,University of Kragujevac | Smit B.,University of Kragujevac | Djekic V.,Center for Small Grains of Kragujevac
Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology | Year: 2016

The aim of the study was to assess the water pollution in terms of total content of heavy metals by parameter called Heavy metal pollution index (HPI). The water samples were collected from four different locations along the course of the river during spring and the autumn seasons. The concentrations of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), arsenic (As) and mercury (Hg) were determined using atomic absorption spectroscopy. The data were used to evaluate HPI of the river water. The mean value of HPI was 67.487 for the spring season, and 80.676 for the autumn season. The average for both seasons and all sampling sites is 74.082. The maximum value of 112.722 found at one sampling site is above the critical index limit of 100. Also, from the values of mean HPI for each sampling site could be concluded that the pollution load at sampling site-4 is the most significant (HPI 89.575). © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York


PubMed | University of Kragujevac and Center for Small Grains of Kragujevac
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Bulletin of environmental contamination and toxicology | Year: 2016

The aim of the study was to assess the water pollution in terms of total content of heavy metals by parameter called Heavy metal pollution index (HPI). The water samples were collected from four different locations along the course of the river during spring and the autumn seasons. The concentrations of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), arsenic (As) and mercury (Hg) were determined using atomic absorption spectroscopy. The data were used to evaluate HPI of the river water. The mean value of HPI was 67.487 for the spring season, and 80.676 for the autumn season. The average for both seasonsand all sampling sites is 74.082. The maximum value of 112.722 found at one sampling site is above the critical index limit of 100. Also, from the values of mean HPI for each sampling site could be concluded that the pollution load at sampling site-4 is the most significant (HPI 89.575).

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