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Johnston D.W.,Monash University | Piatti M.,Queensland University of Technology | Torgler B.,Queensland University of Technology | Torgler B.,EBS University for business and law | Torgler B.,Center for Research in Economics
Scientometrics | Year: 2013

This study investigates the citation patterns of theoretical and empirical papers published in a top economics journal, namely American Economic Review, over a period of almost 30 years, while also exploring the determinants of citation success. The results indicate that empirical papers attract more citation success than theoretical studies. However, the pattern over time is very similar. Moreover, among empirical papers it appears that the cross-country studies are more successful than single country studies focusing on North America data or other regions. © 2012 Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary.


Chan H.F.,Queensland University of Technology | Onder A.S.,University of Bayreuth | Torgler B.,Queensland University of Technology | Torgler B.,Center for Research in Economics
Scientometrics | Year: 2015

We investigate whether Nobel laureates’ collaborative activities undergo a negative change following prize reception by using publication records of 198 Nobel laureates and analyzing their coauthorship patterns before and after the Nobel Prize. The results overall indicate less collaboration with new coauthors post award than pre award. Nobel laureates are more loyal to collaborations that started before the Prize: looking at coauthorship drop-out rates, we find that these differ significantly between coauthorships that started before the Prize and coauthorships after the Prize. We also find that the greater the intensity of pre-award cooperation and the longer the period of pre-award collaboration, the higher the probability of staying in the coauthor network after the award, implying a higher loyalty to the Nobel laureate. © 2015 Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary


Chan H.F.,Queensland University of Technology | Torgler B.,Queensland University of Technology | Torgler B.,Center for Research in Economics
Scientometrics | Year: 2015

Despite much scholarly fascination with the question of whether great minds appear in cycles, together with some empirical evidence that historical cycles exist, prior studies mostly disregard the “great minds” hypothesis as it relates to scientists. Rather, researchers assume a linear relation based on the argument that science is allied with the development of technology. To probe this issue further, this study uses a ranking of over 5600 scientists based on number of appearances in Google Books over a period of 200 years (1800–2000). The results point to several peak periods, particularly for scientists born in the 1850–1859, 1897–1906, or 1900–1909 periods, suggesting overall cycles of around 8 years and a positive trend in distinction that lasts around 100 years. Nevertheless, a non-parametric test to determine whether randomness can be rejected indicates that non-randomness is less apparent, although once we analyse the greatest minds overall, rejection is more likely. © 2015, Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary.


Stadelmann D.,University of Bayreuth | Stadelmann D.,Center for Research in Economics | Torgler B.,Center for Research in Economics | Torgler B.,Queensland University of Technology | Torgler B.,EBS University for business and law
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Using a quasi-natural voting experiment encompassing a 160-year period (1848-2009) in Switzerland, we investigate whether a higher level of complexity leads to increased reliance on trusted parliamentary representatives. We find that when more referenda are held on the same day, constituents are more likely to refer to parliamentary recommendations when making their decisions. This finding holds true even when we narrow our focus to referenda with a relatively lower voter turnout on days on which more than one referendum is held. We also demonstrate that when constituents face a higher level of complexity, they follow the parliamentary recommendations rather than those of interest groups. "Viewed as a geometric figure, the ant's path is irregular, complex, hard to describe. But its complexity is really a complexity in the surface of the beach, not a complexity in the ant." ( [1 ] p. 51) © 2013 Stadelmann, Torgler.


Chan H.F.,Queensland University of Technology | Onder A.S.,University of Bayreuth | Torgler B.,Queensland University of Technology | Torgler B.,Center for Research in Economics
Scientometrics | Year: 2016

Despite much in-depth investigation of factors influencing the coauthorship evolution in various scientific fields, our knowledge about how efficiency or creativity is linked to the longevity of collaborative relationships remains very limited. We explore what Nobel laureates’ coauthorship patterns reveal about the nature of scientific collaborations looking at the intensity and success of scientific collaborations across fields and across laureates’ collaborative lifecycles in physics, chemistry, and physiology/medicine. We find that more collaboration with the same researcher is actually no better for advancing creativity: publications produced early in a sequence of repeated collaborations with a given coauthor tend to be published better and cited more than papers that come later in the collaboration with the same coauthor. Our results indicate that scientific collaboration involves conceptual complementarities that may erode over a sequence of repeated interactions. © 2015, Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary.


Frey B.S.,University of Zürich | Frey B.S.,Center for Research in Economics | Savage D.A.,Queensland University of Technology | Torglerb B.,Center for Research in Economics | Torglerb B.,Queensland University of Technology
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America | Year: 2010

To understand human behavior, it is important to know under what conditions people deviate from selfish rationality. This study explores the interaction of natural survival instincts and internalized social norms using data on the sinking of the Titanic and the Lusitania. We show that time pressure appears to be crucial when explaining behavior under extreme conditions of life and death. Even though the two vessels and the composition of their passengers were quite similar, the behavior of the individuals on board was dramatically different. On the Lusitania, selfish behavior dominated (which corresponds to the classical homo economicus); on the Titanic, social norms and social status (class) dominated, which contradicts standard economics. This difference could be attributed to the fact that the Lusitania sank in 18 min, creating a situation in which the short-run flight impulse dominated behavior. On the slowly sinking Titanic (2 h, 40 min), there was time for socially determined behavioral patterns to reemerge. Maritime disasters are traditionally not analyzed in a comparative manner with advanced statistical (econometric) techniques using individual data of the passengers and crew. Knowing human behavior under extreme conditions provides insight into how widely human behavior can vary, depending on differing external conditions.


Rost K.,University of Zürich | Stahel L.,University of Zürich | Frey B.S.,Center for Research in Economics
PLoS ONE | Year: 2016

Actors of public interest today have to fear the adverse impact that stems from social media platforms. Any controversial behavior may promptly trigger temporal, but potentially devastating storms of emotional and aggressive outrage, so called online firestorms. Popular targets of online firestorms are companies, politicians, celebrities, media, academics and many more. This article introduces social norm theory to understand online aggression in a social-political online setting, challenging the popular assumption that online anonymity is one of the principle factors that promotes aggression. We underpin this social norm view by analyzing a major social media platform concerned with public affairs over a period of three years entailing 532,197 comments on 1,612 online petitions. Results show that in the context of online firestorms, non-anonymous individuals are more aggressive compared to anonymous individuals. This effect is reinforced if selective incentives are present and if aggressors are intrinsically motivated. © 2016 Rost et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


PubMed | University of Zürich and Center for Research in Economics
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2016

Actors of public interest today have to fear the adverse impact that stems from social media platforms. Any controversial behavior may promptly trigger temporal, but potentially devastating storms of emotional and aggressive outrage, so called online firestorms. Popular targets of online firestorms are companies, politicians, celebrities, media, academics and many more. This article introduces social norm theory to understand online aggression in a social-political online setting, challenging the popular assumption that online anonymity is one of the principle factors that promotes aggression. We underpin this social norm view by analyzing a major social media platform concerned with public affairs over a period of three years entailing 532,197 comments on 1,612 online petitions. Results show that in the context of online firestorms, non-anonymous individuals are more aggressive compared to anonymous individuals. This effect is reinforced if selective incentives are present and if aggressors are intrinsically motivated.


Stadelmann D.,University of Bayreuth | Stadelmann D.,Center for Research in Economics | Billon S.,Aalto University
Papers in Regional Science | Year: 2015

Capitalization of fiscal packages is often considered as a pure demand side phenomenon. House price premiums in fiscally attractive communities may lead to housing supply reactions and capitalization may disappear in the long-run. However, if price differentials induced by fiscal variables do not lead to supply reactions, capitalization persists over time. Using an empirical linear interaction model, we analyse changes in capitalization of fiscal variables over time. Results indicate that capitalization of fiscal variables persists and capitalization rates do not change over time. © 2014 RSAI.


Frey R.L.,Center for Research in Economics
Schweizerische Zeitschrift fur Forstwesen | Year: 2011

Urban sprawl, although not desirable, cannot effectively be opposed by existing land use planning: the forest is one of the few barriers which can keep it in check. That is why it would be inappropriate at the present time to relax the ban on clearances and to change forest areas into building zones. The protagonists of a less restrictive forest policy argue that it is necessary to optimize the use of land which is becoming more and more scarce. However, this would only be justifiable if landscape development could be correctly controlled through market forces. This is not the case. External costs in the dimension of ten billions of francs a year in transport and building development have in fact the effect of a kind of subsidy on land use and thus encourage uncontrolled development.

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