Center for Rapid and Sustainable Product Development

Marinha Grande, Portugal

Center for Rapid and Sustainable Product Development

Marinha Grande, Portugal
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Lima L.L.,University of Campinas | Zavaglia C.A.C.,University of Campinas | Bavaresco V.P.,University of Campinas | Pinto E.,Center for Rapid and Sustainable Product Development | And 2 more authors.
High Value Manufacturing: Advanced Research in Virtual and Rapid Prototyping - Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Advanced Research and Rapid Prototyping, VR@P 2013 | Year: 2014

The photopolymerization kinect of 2-Hydroxyethyl Methacrylate (pHEMA) copolymerized with 1-Vinyl-2-Pyrrolidinone hydrogels was performad using the μSTLG mm (Micro Stereo-thermal-lithography multi-material) machine. In this study was used two differents crosslinked agent, and interaction time were varied to obtain the optimal parameters to photopolimerization the hydrogels. The kinect study improves to guarantee the uniformity in material curing, refleting consequently on mechanical resistance, and thus avoiding possible dimensional errors in the built part. Many works and studies were realized using pHEMA hydrogels, because this biomaterial have biocompatibility and similar mechanical resistance of soft tissues. © 2014 Taylor & Francis Group.


Gomez E.,Monterrey Institute of Technology | Dias J.,Center for Rapid and Sustainable Product Development | D'Amora U.,CNR Institute of Composite and Biomedical Materials | Rodriguez C.A.,Monterrey Institute of Technology | And 2 more authors.
Advanced Materials Research | Year: 2013

Ideal scaffolds for tissue engineering should mimic the complex characteristics of natural tissues and their mechanical performance. This work presents a new concept of hybrid scaffolds produced through the combination of electrospinning and an additive bioextruder system. The obtained results have shown that the hybrid structures present improved mechanical properties. © (2013) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.


Perestrelo P.,Center for Rapid and Sustainable Product Development | Bartolo P.,Center for Rapid and Sustainable Product Development | Torres M.P.,Archer Technologies | Noritomi P.,Archer Technologies | Silva J.,Archer Technologies
High Value Manufacturing: Advanced Research in Virtual and Rapid Prototyping - Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Advanced Research and Rapid Prototyping, VR@P 2013 | Year: 2014

The Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a disturbing cause of death that has been growing year after year. In an effort to prevent, detect and understand it, a more audacious approach must be given to this problem. With this purpose, biomechanical and clinical theories must be combined with the objective of improving the technics available. The proposed development of a virtual platform includes the acknowledgement of the human head's anatomy and injuries classification. This platform or virtual model, is developed with the BioCAD protocol, Computer Aided Design (CAD) software and Finite Element Method (FEM) analysis software. The final version of this virtual platform has a demand of being adaptive to the user and/or patient occasioning in an innovative tool most needed to improve the research and prevention of TBI. Hopefully, this will result in a higher level of understanding of this problem. © 2014 Taylor & Francis Group.


Almeida H.A.,Center for Rapid and Sustainable Product Development | Bartolo P.J.,Center for Rapid and Sustainable Product Development
Polymer International | Year: 2013

Scaffolds provide a temporary mechanical and vascular support for tissue regeneration while shaping the in-growth tissues. These scaffolds must be biocompatible, biodegradable, enclose appropriate porosity, pore structure and pore distribution, and have optimal structural and vascular performance, with both surface and structural compatibility. Surface compatibility means a chemical, biological and physical suitability to the host tissue. Structural compatibility corresponds to an optimal adaptation to the mechanical behaviour of the host tissue. Recent advances in the design of tissue engineering scaffolds are increasingly relying on computer-aided design modelling and numerical simulations. The design of optimized scaffolds based on fundamental knowledge of their macro microstructure is a relevant topic of research. This research work presents a comparison between experimental compressive data and numerical simulations of bioextruded polymer scaffolds with different pore sizes for the elastic and plastic domain. Constitutive behaviour models of cellular structures are used in numerical simulations to compare numerical data with the experimental compressive data. Vascular simulation is also used in the design process of the extrusion-based scaffolds in order to define an optimized scaffold design. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.


Mitchell G.R.,Center for Rapid and Sustainable Product Development | Ahn K.-H.,University of Reading | Davis F.J.,University of Reading
Virtual and Physical Prototyping | Year: 2011

We review the process of electrospinning and how this new technique for generating a rich morphology of nano and micro scale fibres sits alongside established procedures for rapid manufacturing. We introduce the key elements of electrospinning and how these influence the nature and distribution of the fibres produced. We describe the range of polymers available for electrospinning and the limitations to the use of these materials. Using this base we review the potential approaches to using electrospinning as part of a broader rapid manufacturing system and the possible applications for such a hybrid system. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.

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