Center for Non Communicable Diseases

Karachi, Pakistan

Center for Non Communicable Diseases

Karachi, Pakistan
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Aikens R.C.,Swarthmore College | Zhao W.,University of Pennsylvania | Saleheen D.,University of Pennsylvania | Saleheen D.,Center for Non Communicable Diseases | And 5 more authors.
Diabetes | Year: 2017

Observational studies have shown that elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) is associated with future onset of type 2 diabetes, but whether this association is causal is not known. We applied the Mendelian randomization framework to evaluate the causal hypothesis that elevated SBP increases risk for type 2 diabetes.We used 28 genetic variants associated with SBP and evaluated their impact on type 2 diabetes using a European-centric meta-analysis comprising 37,293 case and 125,686 control subjects. We found that elevation of SBP levels by 1 mmHg due to our genetic score was associated with a 2% increase in risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio 1.02, 95% CI 1.01-1.03, P = 9.05 3 10-5). To limit confounding, we constructed a second score based on 13 variants exclusively associated with SBP and found a similar increase in type 2 diabetes risk per 1 mmHg of genetic elevation in SBP (odds ratio 1.02, 95% CI 1.01-1.03, P = 1.48 3 10-3). Sensitivity analyses using multiple, alternative causal inference measures and simulation studies demonstrated consistent association, suggesting robustness of our primary observation. In line with previous reports from observational studies, we found that genetically elevated SBP was associated with increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Further work will be required to elucidate the biological mechanism and translational implications. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.


PubMed | Karolinska Institutet, Central Finland Health Care District, Amgen, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and 93 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nature genetics | Year: 2016

To dissect the genetic architecture of blood pressure and assess effects on target organ damage, we analyzed 128,272 SNPs from targeted and genome-wide arrays in 201,529 individuals of European ancestry, and genotypes from an additional 140,886 individuals were used for validation. We identified 66 blood pressure-associated loci, of which 17 were new; 15 harbored multiple distinct association signals. The 66 index SNPs were enriched for cis-regulatory elements, particularly in vascular endothelial cells, consistent with a primary role in blood pressure control through modulation of vascular tone across multiple tissues. The 66 index SNPs combined in a risk score showed comparable effects in 64,421 individuals of non-European descent. The 66-SNP blood pressure risk score was significantly associated with target organ damage in multiple tissues but with minor effects in the kidney. Our findings expand current knowledge of blood pressure-related pathways and highlight tissues beyond the classical renal system in blood pressure regulation.


PubMed | National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Columbus University, Queen's University of Belfast, University of Verona and 60 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nature genetics | Year: 2016

High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature death. However, there is limited knowledge on specific causal genes and pathways. To better understand the genetics of blood pressure, we genotyped 242,296 rare, low-frequency and common genetic variants in up to 192,763 individuals and used 155,063 samples for independent replication. We identified 30 new blood pressure- or hypertension-associated genetic regions in the general population, including 3 rare missense variants in RBM47, COL21A1 and RRAS with larger effects (>1.5 mm Hg/allele) than common variants. Multiple rare nonsense and missense variant associations were found in A2ML1, and a low-frequency nonsense variant in ENPEP was identified. Our data extend the spectrum of allelic variation underlying blood pressure traits and hypertension, provide new insights into the pathophysiology of hypertension and indicate new targets for clinical intervention.


PubMed | University of Turku, Kk Womens And Childrens Hospital, CNR Institute of Neuroscience, University of Houston and 76 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nature genetics | Year: 2015

We carried out a trans-ancestry genome-wide association and replication study of blood pressure phenotypes among up to 320,251 individuals of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. We find genetic variants at 12 new loci to be associated with blood pressure (P = 3.9 10(-11) to 5.0 10(-21)). The sentinel blood pressure SNPs are enriched for association with DNA methylation at multiple nearby CpG sites, suggesting that, at some of the loci identified, DNA methylation may lie on the regulatory pathway linking sequence variation to blood pressure. The sentinel SNPs at the 12 new loci point to genes involved in vascular smooth muscle (IGFBP3, KCNK3, PDE3A and PRDM6) and renal (ARHGAP24, OSR1, SLC22A7 and TBX2) function. The new and known genetic variants predict increased left ventricular mass, circulating levels of NT-proBNP, and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality (P = 0.04 to 8.6 10(-6)). Our results provide new evidence for the role of DNA methylation in blood pressure regulation.

Loading Center for Non Communicable Diseases collaborators
Loading Center for Non Communicable Diseases collaborators