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Sanchez-Catasus C.A.,Center for Neurological Restoration | Sanchez-Catasus C.A.,Cuban Neuroscience Center | Stormezand G.N.,University of Groningen | Jan van Laar P.,University of Groningen | And 5 more authors.
Current Alzheimer Research | Year: 2017

This review article aims at providing a state-of-the-art review of the role of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging (FDG-PET) in the prediction of Alzheimer's dementia in subjects suffering mild cognitive impairment (MCI), with a particular focus on the predictive power of FDG-PET compared to structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI). We also address perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as a less costly and more accessible alternative to FDG-PET. A search in PubMed was performed, taking into consideration relevant scientific articles published in English within the last five years and limited to human studies. This recent literature confirms the effectiveness of FDG-PET and sMRI for prediction of AD dementia in MCI. However, there are discordant results regarding which image modality is superior. This could be explained by the high variability of metrics used to evaluate both imaging modalities and/or by sampling/population issues such as age, disease severity and conversion time. FDG-PET seems to outperform sMRI in rapidly converting early-onset MCI individuals, whereas sMRI may outperform FDG-PET in late-onset MCI subjects, in which case FDG PET might only provide a complementary role. Although FDG-PET performs better than perfusion SPECT, current evidence confirms perfusion SPECT as a valid alternative when FDG- PET is not available. Finally, possible future directions in the field are discussed. © 2017 Bentham Science Publishers.


Floden D.,Center for Neurological Restoration | Cooper S.E.,Center for Neurological Restoration | Machado A.G.,Center for Neurological Restoration
Neurology | Year: 2014

Objectives: To examine disease, treatment, cognitive, and psychological factors associated with quality of life (QoL) before and after surgery and assess the ability to predict QoL outcomes. Methods: We identified a retrospective, cross-sectional sample of 85 patients with Parkinson disease who underwent subthalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS). Patients' QoL was categorized as "improved" and "stable/worsened" using reliable change indices. Univariate correlational analyses identified relationships between Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 ratings and disease (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-III [UPDRS-III] motor scores on and off medications, disease duration), treatment (medication burden, unilateral vs bilateral DBS), cognitive (neuropsychological battery), and psychological (depression) variables. Step-wise multiple linear regression and logistic regression models included selected preoperative variables to predict change in QoL ratings and QoL outcome after surgery. Results: Fifty-one percent of patients reported clinically significant improvements in QoL while 47% reported stable QoL and 2% worsened. Motor scores (UPDRS-III) were not relevant to QoL changes, potentially because of the rarity of poor motor outcomes, while single-trial learning and depression scores were the most important variables in predicting QoL changes. There was a subtle additional benefit to undergoing bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS. Conclusions: The findings provide greater insight into the nonmotor features that contribute to the success of subthalamic nucleus DBS procedures from the patient's perspective and raise questions about the treatment focus and emphasis on symptom profiles in DBS candidacy evaluations. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.


PubMed | Mount Sinai School of Medicine, d Psychology Section Affairs Medical Center, University of Illinois at Chicago, University of Massachusetts Amherst and Center for Neurological Restoration
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Clinical neuropsychologist | Year: 2016

To gather illustrative data from clinical neuropsychologists who are working in integrated care settings in order to provide an initial blueprint for moving forward in this new era of health care.A survey was designed to illustrate the ways in which neuropsychologists are participating in integrated care teams and distributed on major neuropsychology listservs. The survey evaluated the settings, roles, services provided, practice issues, remuneration, and impact of neuropsychologists participation in integrated care teams with respect to patient care and health outcomes. Frequencies were used to summarize the findings as well as qualitative coding of narrative responses.There were 412 respondents to the survey and 261 of those indicated that they worked in at least one integrated care setting. Neuropsychologists work in a variety of integrated care settings and provide diverse services which contribute to improved patient care and outcomes.Three primary themes emerge from the findings with regard to the engagement and teams: advocacy, collaboration, and communication. We argue for the need for more easily accessible outcome studies illustrating the clinical benefits and cost-savings associated with inclusion of neuropsychologists in integrated care teams. In addition, educational and training initiatives are needed to better equip current and future clinical neuropsychologists to function effectively in integrated care settings.


Machado C.,Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery INN | Estevez M.,INN | Rodriguez R.,Neuroimaging Group | Perez-Nellar J.,Hermanos Ameijeiras Clinical Surgical Teaching Hospital | And 6 more authors.
MEDICC Review | Year: 2012

The Cuban Group for Study of Disorders of Consciousness is developing several research protocols to search for possible preservation of residual brain and autonomic functions in cases of persistent vegetative and minimally conscious states. We present examples showing the importance of 3D anatomic reconstruction of brain structures and MRI tractography for assessing white matter connectivity. We also present results of use of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy technique to follow up cognitive recovery in persistent vegetative state patients transitioning to minimally conscious state. We have demonstrated recognition of a mother's voice with emotional content after zolpidem administration, indicating high-level residual linguistic processing and brain activation despite the patient's apparent inability to communicate. Hence we differ with current thinking that, by definition, subjects in persistent vegetative state are isolated from the outside world and cannot experience pain and suffering. We also consider "vegetative state"a pejorative term that should be replaced.


Alberts J.L.,Cleveland Clinic | Alberts J.L.,Center for Neurological Restoration | Alberts J.L.,Cleveland Center | Linder S.M.,Cleveland Clinic | And 7 more authors.
Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews | Year: 2011

Forced exercise has resulted in neuroprotective effects and improved motor function in animal studies. These promising results have not yet been translated fully to humans with Parkinson's disease (PD), as traditional exercise interventions have not yielded global improvements in function. A novel forced exercise intervention is described that has resulted in improved motor function and central nervous system function in PD patients. © 2011 by the American College of Sports Medicine.


Sanchez-Catasus C.A.,Center for Neurological Restoration | Sanchez-Catasus C.A.,Cuban Neuroscience Center | Cabrera-Gomez J.,Center for Neurological Restoration | Almaguer Melian W.,Center for Neurological Restoration | And 7 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Recent neuroimaging studies show that brain abnormalities in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) are more frequent than earlier described. Yet, more research considering multiple aspects of NMO is necessary to better understand these abnormalities. A clinical feature of relapsing NMO (RNMO) is that the incremental disability is attack-related. Therefore, association between the attack-related process and neuroimaging might be expected. On the other hand, the immunopathological analysis of NMO lesions has suggested that CNS microvasculature could be an early disease target, which could alter brain perfusion. Brain tissue volume changes accompanying perfusion alteration could also be expected throughout the attack-related process. The aim of this study was to investigate in RNMO patients, by voxel-based correlation analysis, the assumed associations between regional brain white (WMV) and grey matter volumes (GMV) and/or perfusion on one side, and the number of optic neuritis (ON) attacks, myelitis attacks and/or total attacks on the other side. For this purpose, high resolution T1-weighted MRI and perfusion SPECT imaging were obtained in 15 RNMO patients. The results showed negative regional correlations of WMV, GMV and perfusion with the number of ON attacks, involving important components of the visual system, which could be relevant for the comprehension of incremental visual disability in RNMO. We also found positive regional correlation of perfusion with the number of ON attacks, mostly overlapping the brain area where the WMV showed negative correlation. This provides evidence that brain microvasculature is an early disease target and suggests that perfusion alteration could be important in the development of brain structural abnormalities in RNMO. © 2013 Sanchez-Catasus et al.


Sanchez-Catasus C.A.,Center for Neurological Restoration | Sanchez-Catasus C.A.,Cuban Neuroscience Center | Cabrera-Gomez J.,Center for Neurological Restoration | Melian W.A.,Center for Neurological Restoration | And 3 more authors.
Acta Radiologica | Year: 2016

Background: Voxel-based morphometric (VBM) studies in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) have shown limited reproducibility. A previous study suggests that the number of optic neuritis (ON) attacks may be a confounding factor when comparing NMO patients with controls if it is not taken into account during VBM analysis. Purpose: To investigate the potential confounding effect of the number of ON attacks, for both tissue volumes and perfusion by voxel-based statistical analysis. Material and Methods: Volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and perfusion SPECT were obtained from 15 controls and two patient subgroups: subgroup I was composed of nine patients with one or two ON attacks; and subgroup II of six patients with three or four ON attacks. We performed non-parametric voxel-based comparison of tissue volumes and perfusion between controls versus the two patient subgroups and for the whole patient group. Results: Subgroup I presented no volume reductions, contrary to subgroup II that showed unequivocal reduction. We also found hypoperfusion in different brain regions in different subgroups. The results were quite different for the whole patient group. Conclusion: These findings highlight the confounding effect of the number of ON attacks, providing a new methodological insight that could explain the limited reproducibility of previous VBM studies in NMO. ©The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.


PubMed | Cuban Neuroscience Center and Center for Neurological Restoration
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Acta radiologica (Stockholm, Sweden : 1987) | Year: 2016

Voxel-based morphometric (VBM) studies in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) have shown limited reproducibility. A previous study suggests that the number of optic neuritis (ON) attacks may be a confounding factor when comparing NMO patients with controls if it is not taken into account during VBM analysis.To investigate the potential confounding effect of the number of ON attacks, for both tissue volumes and perfusion by voxel-based statistical analysis.Volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and perfusion SPECT were obtained from 15 controls and two patient subgroups: subgroup I was composed of nine patients with one or two ON attacks; and subgroup II of six patients with three or four ON attacks. We performed non-parametric voxel-based comparison of tissue volumes and perfusion between controls versus the two patient subgroups and for the whole patient group.Subgroup I presented no volume reductions, contrary to subgroup II that showed unequivocal reduction. We also found hypoperfusion in different brain regions in different subgroups. The results were quite different for the whole patient group.These findings highlight the confounding effect of the number of ON attacks, providing a new methodological insight that could explain the limited reproducibility of previous VBM studies in NMO.


PubMed | Center for Neurological Restoration
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2016

Recent neuroimaging studies show that brain abnormalities in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) are more frequent than earlier described. Yet, more research considering multiple aspects of NMO is necessary to better understand these abnormalities. A clinical feature of relapsing NMO (RNMO) is that the incremental disability is attack-related. Therefore, association between the attack-related process and neuroimaging might be expected. On the other hand, the immunopathological analysis of NMO lesions has suggested that CNS microvasculature could be an early disease target, which could alter brain perfusion. Brain tissue volume changes accompanying perfusion alteration could also be expected throughout the attack-related process. The aim of this study was to investigate in RNMO patients, by voxel-based correlation analysis, the assumed associations between regional brain white (WMV) and grey matter volumes (GMV) and/or perfusion on one side, and the number of optic neuritis (ON) attacks, myelitis attacks and/or total attacks on the other side. For this purpose, high resolution T1-weighted MRI and perfusion SPECT imaging were obtained in 15 RNMO patients. The results showed negative regional correlations of WMV, GMV and perfusion with the number of ON attacks, involving important components of the visual system, which could be relevant for the comprehension of incremental visual disability in RNMO. We also found positive regional correlation of perfusion with the number of ON attacks, mostly overlapping the brain area where the WMV showed negative correlation. This provides evidence that brain microvasculature is an early disease target and suggests that perfusion alteration could be important in the development of brain structural abnormalities in RNMO.


PubMed | Center for Neurological Restoration
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Cleveland Clinic journal of medicine | Year: 2012

Deep brain stimulation has largely replaced ablative procedures for the treatment of advanced Parkinson disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. It is also approved for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Although not curative, it improves symptoms and quality of life.

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