Center for Medical Imaging North East Netherlands

Groningen, Netherlands

Center for Medical Imaging North East Netherlands

Groningen, Netherlands
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Jorritsma W.,University of Groningen | Prins J.T.,Center for Medical Imaging North East Netherlands | van Ooijen P.M.A.,University of Groningen | van Ooijen P.M.A.,Center for Medical Imaging North East Netherlands
International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction | Year: 2015

This study aimed to determine the most appropriate touch-based interaction technique for I2Vote, an image-based audience response system for radiology education in which users need to accurately mark a target on a medical image. Four plausible techniques were identified: land-on, take-off, zoom-pointing, and shift. The techniques were implemented in such a way that they could be used on any modern device. An empirical study was performed in which users marked a target on an image using all four techniques on either a smartphone or a tablet. The techniques were compared in terms of accuracy, efficiency, ease of use, intuitiveness, and compatibility with the different devices. The results showed that shift was the most accurate technique, but it was hampered by its high complexity and low intuitiveness. Land-on was the fastest technique but also the least accurate. Take-off and zoom-pointing provided the best trade-off between accuracy, efficiency, ease of use, and intuitiveness. We therefore conclude that both take-off and zoom-pointing are viable interaction techniques for I2Vote. © , Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Jorritsma W.,University of Groningen | Cnossen F.,University of Groningen | Dierckx R.A.,University of Groningen | Oudkerk M.,University of Groningen | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Medical Informatics | Year: 2016

Objectives: To determine the number, nature and severity of usability issues radiologists encounter while using a commercially available radiology workstation in clinical practice, and to assess how well the results of a pre-deployment usability evaluation of this workstation generalize to clinical practice. Methods: The usability evaluation consisted of semi-structured interviews and observations of twelve users using the workstation during their daily work. Usability issues and positive usability findings were documented. Each issue was given a severity rating and its root cause was determined. Results were compared to the results of a pre-deployment usability evaluation of the same workstation. Results: Ninety-two usability issues were identified, ranging from issues that cause minor frustration or delay, to issues that cause significant delays, prevent users from completing tasks, or even pose a potential threat to patient safety. The results of the pre-deployment usability evaluation had limited generalizability to clinical practice. Conclusions: This study showed that radiologists encountered a large number and a wide variety of usability issues when using a commercially available radiology workstation in clinical practice. This underlines the need for effective usability engineering in radiology. Given the limitations of pre-deployment usability evaluation in radiology, which were confirmed by our finding that the results of a pre-deployment usability evaluation of this workstation had limited generalizability to clinical practice, it is vital that radiology workstation vendors devote significant resources to usability engineering efforts before deployment of their workstation, and to continue these efforts after the workstation is deployed in a hospital. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Jorritsma W.,University of Groningen | Cnossen F.,University of Groningen | Dierckx R.A.,University of Groningen | Oudkerk M.,University of Groningen | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Medical Informatics | Year: 2016

Objectives: To perform a post-deployment usability evaluation of a radiology Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) client based on pattern mining of user interaction log data, and to assess the usefulness of this approach compared to a field study. Methods: All user actions performed on the PACS client were logged for four months. A data mining technique called closed sequential pattern mining was used to automatically extract frequently occurring interaction patterns from the log data. These patterns were used to identify usability issues with the PACS. The results of this evaluation were compared to the results of a field study based usability evaluation of the same PACS client. Results: The interaction patterns revealed four usability issues: (1) the display protocols do not function properly, (2) the line measurement tool stays active until another tool is selected, rather than being deactivated after one use, (3) the PACS's built-in 3D functionality does not allow users to effectively perform certain 3D-related tasks, (4) users underuse the PACS's customization possibilities. All usability issues identified based on the log data were also found in the field study, which identified 48 issues in total. Conclusions: Post-deployment usability evaluation based on pattern mining of user interaction log data provides useful insights into the way users interact with the radiology PACS client. However, it reveals few usability issues compared to a field study and should therefore not be used as the sole method of usability evaluation. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Den Dekker M.A.M.,Center for Medical Imaging North East Netherlands | Den Dekker M.A.M.,University of Groningen | Van Den Dungen J.J.A.M.,University of Groningen | Tielliu I.F.J.,University of Groningen | And 5 more authors.
European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery | Year: 2013

Objective Patients with extra-cardiac arterial disease (ECAD) are at high risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). Prevalence of silent, significant CAD in patients with stenotic or aneurysmal ECAD was examined. Early detection and treatment may reduce CAD mortality in this high-risk group. Materials and methods ECAD patients without cardiac complaints underwent computed tomography (CT) for calcium scoring, coronary CT angiography (cCTA) if calcium score was 1,000 or under, and adenosine perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (APMR) if there was no left main stenosis. Significant CAD was defined as calcium score over 1,000, cCTA-detected coronary stenosis of at least 50% lumen diameter, and/or APMR-detected inducible myocardial ischemia. In cases of left main stenosis (or equivalent) or myocardial ischemia, patients were referred to a cardiologist. Results The prevalence of significant CAD was 56.8% (95% CI 47.5 to 66.0). One-hundred and eleven patients were included. Eighty-four patients (76%) had stenotic ECAD, and 27 (24%) had aneurysmal disease. In patients with stenotic ECAD, significant coronary stenosis was present in 32 (38%) and inducible ischemia in eight (12%). Corresponding results in aneurysmal ECAD were eight (30%) and two (11%), respectively (p for difference >.05). Sixteen (19%) patients with stenotic and six (22%) with aneurysmal ECAD were referred to a cardiologist, with subsequent cardiac intervention in seven (44%) and three (50%), respectively (both p >.05). Conclusions Patients with stenotic or aneurysmal ECAD have a high prevalence of silent, significant CAD. © 2013 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Jorritsma W.,University of Groningen | Cnossen F.,University of Groningen | Van Ooijen P.M.A.,University of Groningen | Van Ooijen P.M.A.,Center for Medical Imaging North East Netherlands
Clinical Radiology | Year: 2015

Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) has great potential to improve radiologists' diagnostic performance. However, the reported performance of the radiologist-CAD team is lower than what might be expected based on the performance of the radiologist and the CAD system in isolation. This indicates that the interaction between radiologists and the CAD system is not optimal. An important factor in the interaction between humans and automated aids (such as CAD) is trust. Suboptimal performance of the human-automation team is often caused by an inappropriate level of trust in the automation. In this review, we examine the role of trust in the radiologist-CAD interaction and suggest ways to improve the output of the CAD system so that it allows radiologists to calibrate their trust in the CAD system more effectively. Observer studies of the CAD systems show that radiologists often have an inappropriate level of trust in the CAD system. They sometimes under-trust CAD, thereby reducing its potential benefits, and sometimes over-trust it, leading to diagnostic errors they would not have made without CAD. Based on the literature on trust in human-automation interaction and the results of CAD observer studies, we have identified four ways to improve the output of CAD so that it allows radiologists to form a more appropriate level of trust in CAD. Designing CAD systems for appropriate trust is important and can improve the performance of the radiologist-CAD team. Future CAD research and development should acknowledge the importance of the radiologist-CAD interaction, and specifically the role of trust therein, in order to create the perfect artificial partner for the radiologist. This review focuses on the role of trust in the radiologist-CAD interaction. The aim of the review is to encourage CAD developers to design for appropriate trust and thereby improve the performance of the radiologist-CAD team. © 2014 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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