Center for Malting and Brewing Science

Heverlee, Belgium

Center for Malting and Brewing Science

Heverlee, Belgium
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Saison D.,Center for Malting and Brewing Science | Vanbeneden N.,Center for Malting and Brewing Science | De Schutter D.P.,Center for Malting and Brewing Science | Daenen L.,Center for Malting and Brewing Science | And 3 more authors.
BrewingScience | Year: 2010

Aged beer flavour was studied by ageing a lager beer in different conditions (varying temperature-time profiles, different oxidative conditions and varying pH and ethanol concentrations). This led to beers with a varying aged flavour, which could be explained by differences in the reaction rate of ageing reactions. High temperatures, oxidative conditions and to a lesser extent, a lower pH, accelerated beer ageing. Enhanced (E)-2-nonenal formation probably led to the greater perception of cardboard flavour after ageing at high temperatures. Madeira flavour was only perceived after ageing at 20 °C and ribes flavour was mainly perceived in oxidatively aged beer. In beers with these flavour notes, high concentrations of acetaldehyde, Strecker aldehydes and diacetyl were found and in the Madeira flavoured beer, also of 2-furfuryl ethyl ether and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural. In the end, this study provides an overview of the different aged flavours that can develop in different ageing conditions and the corresponding flavour compounds that make up the chemical composition of these flavours.


Saison D.,Center for Malting and Brewing Science | De Schutter D.P.,Center for Malting and Brewing Science | Delvaux F.,Center for Malting and Brewing Science | Delvaux F.R.,Center for Malting and Brewing Science
Journal of the American Society of Brewing Chemists | Year: 2011

Unwanted flavor changes occur during beer storage. Because yeast has a large reducing activity on aging compounds, the aim of this study was to examine the effect of refermentation on flavor stability. It was shown that the addition of yeast to aged beer removed aged flavor almost completely. Furthermore, the addition of yeast to fresh beer decelerated beer aging considerably. Both a top-fermenting and a bottom-fermenting yeast strain were able to exert this effect, and it was clear that initiation of a real refermentation process by adding sugar was not required. Finally, several yeast concentrations were tested, and it appeared that even adding an amount as low as 10,000 yeast cells/mL was sufficient to slow beer aging. Nonetheless, the effect was more pronounced when higher concentrations were used. © 2011 American Society of Brewing Chemists, Inc.

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