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Wens S.C.A.,Erasmus University Rotterdam | Ciet P.,Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center | Perez-Rovira A.,Erasmus University Rotterdam | Logie K.,Erasmus MC Sophia | And 7 more authors.
BMC Pulmonary Medicine | Year: 2015

Background: Pompe disease is a progressive metabolic myopathy. Involvement of respiratory muscles leads to progressive pulmonary dysfunction, particularly in supine position. Diaphragmatic weakness is considered to be the most important component. Standard spirometry is to some extent indicative but provides too little insight into diaphragmatic dynamics. We used lung MRI to study diaphragmatic and chest-wall movements in Pompe disease. Methods: In ten adult Pompe patients and six volunteers, we acquired two static spirometer-controlled MRI scans during maximum inspiration and expiration. Images were manually segmented. After normalization for lung size, changes in lung dimensions between inspiration and expiration were used for analysis; normalization was based on the cranial-caudal length ratio (representing vertical diaphragmatic displacement), and the anterior-posterior and left-right length ratios (representing chest-wall movements due to thoracic muscles). Results: We observed striking dysfunction of the diaphragm in Pompe patients; in some patients the diaphragm did not show any displacement. Patients had smaller cranial-caudal length ratios than volunteers (p < 0.001), indicating diaphragmatic weakness. This variable strongly correlated with forced vital capacity in supine position (r = 0.88) and postural drop (r = 0.89). While anterior-posterior length ratios also differed between patients and volunteers (p = 0.04), left-right length ratios did not (p = 0.1). Conclusions: MRI is an innovative tool to visualize diaphragmatic dynamics in Pompe patients and to study chest-walland diaphragmatic movements in more detail. Our data indicate that diaphragmatic displacement may be severely disturbed in patients with Pompe disease. © 2015 Wens et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Source


Mogalle K.,Erasmus University Rotterdam | Perez-Rovira A.,Erasmus University Rotterdam | Ciet P.,Erasmus University Rotterdam | Wens S.C.A.,Erasmus University Rotterdam | And 8 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2016

Background: Diaphragm weakness is the main reason for respiratory dysfunction in patients with Pompe disease, a progressive metabolic myopathy affecting respiratory and limb-girdle muscles. Since respiratory failure is the major cause of death among adult patients, early identification of respiratory muscle involvement is necessary to initiate treatment in time and possibly prevent irreversible damage. In this paper we investigate the suitability of dynamic MR imaging in combination with state-of-the-art image analysis methods to assess respiratory muscle weakness. Methods: The proposed methodology relies on image registration and lung surface extraction to quantify lung kinematics during breathing. This allows for the extraction of geometry and motion features of the lung that characterize the independent contribution of the diaphragm and the thoracic muscles to the respiratory cycle. Results: Results in 16 3D+t MRI scans (10 Pompe patients and 6 controls) of a slow expiratory maneuver show that kinematic analysis from dynamic 3D images reveals important additional information about diaphragm mechanics and respiratory muscle involvement when compared to conventional pulmonary function tests. Pompe patients with severely reduced pulmonary function showed severe diaphragm weakness presented by minimal motion of the diaphragm. In patients with moderately reduced pulmonary function, cranial displacement of posterior diaphragm parts was reduced and the diaphragm dome was oriented more horizontally at full inspiration compared to healthy controls. Conclusion: Dynamic 3D MRI provides data for analyzing the contribution of both diaphragm and thoracic muscles independently. The proposed image analysis method has the potential to detect less severe diaphragm weakness and could thus be used to determine the optimal start of treatment in adult patients with Pompe disease in prospect of increased treatment response. © 2016 Mogalle et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Source


Wens S.C.A.,Erasmus University Rotterdam | Wens S.C.A.,Center for Lysosomal and Metabolic Diseases | Ciet P.,Erasmus University Rotterdam | Ciet P.,Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center | And 12 more authors.
BMC Pulmonary Medicine | Year: 2015

Background: Pompe disease is a progressive metabolic myopathy. Involvement of respiratory muscles leads to progressive pulmonary dysfunction, particularly in supine position. Diaphragmatic weakness is considered to be the most important component. Standard spirometry is to some extent indicative but provides too little insight into diaphragmatic dynamics. We used lung MRI to study diaphragmatic and chest-wall movements in Pompe disease. Methods: In ten adult Pompe patients and six volunteers, we acquired two static spirometer-controlled MRI scans during maximum inspiration and expiration. Images were manually segmented. After normalization for lung size, changes in lung dimensions between inspiration and expiration were used for analysis; normalization was based on the cranial-caudal length ratio (representing vertical diaphragmatic displacement), and the anterior-posterior and left-right length ratios (representing chest-wall movements due to thoracic muscles). Results: We observed striking dysfunction of the diaphragm in Pompe patients; in some patients the diaphragm did not show any displacement. Patients had smaller cranial-caudal length ratios than volunteers (p < 0.001), indicating diaphragmatic weakness. This variable strongly correlated with forced vital capacity in supine position (r = 0.88) and postural drop (r = 0.89). While anterior-posterior length ratios also differed between patients and volunteers (p = 0.04), left-right length ratios did not (p = 0.1). Conclusions: MRI is an innovative tool to visualize diaphragmatic dynamics in Pompe patients and to study chest-walland diaphragmatic movements in more detail. Our data indicate that diaphragmatic displacement may be severely disturbed in patients with Pompe disease. © 2015 Wens et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Source


Van Der Beek N.A.M.E.,Erasmus Medical Center | Van Der Beek N.A.M.E.,Center for Lysosomal and Metabolic Diseases | Verschuure H.,Erasmus Medical Center | Reuser A.J.J.,Erasmus Medical Center | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease | Year: 2012

Hearing loss has been recognized as an important cause of morbidity in infants with Pompe disease, a metabolic disorder caused by deficiency of acid á-glucosidase. It is unknown whether hearing is also affected in adult Pompe patients. We have studied the prevalence, severity, and type of hearing loss in 58 adult patients using tympanometry and pure-tone audiometry. Compared to normative data (International Organisation for Standardisation standard 7029), 72% of patients had impaired hearing thresholds at one or more frequencies in at least one ear. All measured frequencies were equally affected. All patients had a sensorineural type of hearing loss, pointing to cochlear or retrocochlear pathology. Categorised according to the standards of the World Health Organisation 21% of patients had a clinically relevant hearing loss (16% slight, 3% moderate, 2% profound). Though this suggests that hearing loss occurs in a considerable number of patients with Pompe disease, this prevalence is similar to that in the general population. Therefore, we conclude that hearing loss is not a specific feature of Pompe disease in adults. © 2011 SSIEM and Springer. Source


Ebbink B.J.,Center for Lysosomal and Metabolic Diseases | Van Gelder C.M.,Center for Lysosomal and Metabolic Diseases | Van Den Hout J.M.P.,Center for Lysosomal and Metabolic Diseases | Jaeken J.,Erasmus Medical Center | And 2 more authors.
Neurology | Year: 2012

Objective: Classic infantile Pompe disease affects many tissues, including the brain. Untreated infants die within their first year. Although enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) significantly increases survival, its potential limitation is that the drug cannot cross the blood-brain barrier. We therefore investigated long-term cognitive development in patients treated with ERT. Methods: We prospectively assessed cognitive functioning in 10 children with classic infantile Pompe disease who had been treated with ERT since 1999. Brain imaging was performed in 6 children. Results: During the first 4 years of life, developmental scores in 10 children ranged from aboveaverage development to severe developmental delay; they were influenced by the type of intelligence test used, severity of motor problems, speech/language difficulties, and age at start of therapy. Five of the children were also tested from 5 years onward. Among them were 2 tetraplegic children whose earlier scores had indicated severe developmental delay. These scores now ranged between normal and mild developmental delay and indicated that at young age poor motor functioning may interfere with proper assessment of cognition. We found delayed processing speed in 2 children. Brain imaging revealed periventricular white matter abnormalities in 4 children. Conclusions: Cognitive development at school age ranged between normal and mildly delayed in our long-term survivors with classic infantile Pompe disease treated with ERT. The oldest was 12 years. We found that cognition is easily underestimated in children younger than 5 years with poor motor functioning. Copyright © 2012 by AAN Enterprises, Inc. Source

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