Time filter

Source Type

Moniruzzaman M.,Noncommunicable Disease Unit | Zaman M.M.,Noncommunicable Disease Unit | Mashreky S.R.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | Rahman A.K.M.F.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh
BMJ Open | Year: 2016

To conduct a comprehensive survey on disability to determine the prevalence and distribution of cause-specific disability among residents of the Manikganj district in Bangladesh. Methods: The survey was conducted in Manikganj, a typical district in Bangladesh, in 2009. Data were collected from 37 030 individuals of all ages. Samples were drawn from 8905 households from urban and rural areas proportionate to population size. Three sets of interviewer-administered questionnaires were used separately for age groups 0-1 years, 2-10 years and 11 years and above to collect data. For the age groups 0-1 years and 2-10 years, the parents or the head of the household were interviewed to obtain the responses. Impairments, activity limitations and restriction of participation were considered in defining disability consistent with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework. Results: Overall, age-standardised prevalence of disability per 1000 was 46.5 (95% CI 44.4 to 48.6). Prevalence was significantly higher among respondents living in rural areas (50.2; 95% CI 47.7 to 52.7) than in urban areas (31.0; 95% CI 27.0 to 35.0). Overall, female respondents had more disability (50.0; 95% CI 46.9 to 53.1) than male respondents (43.4; 95% CI 40.5 to 46.3). Educational deprivation was closely linked to higher prevalence of disability. Commonly reported prevalences (per 1000) for underlying causes of disability were 20.2 for illness, followed by 9.4 for congenital causes and 6.8 for injury, and these were consistent in males and females. Conclusions: Disability is a common problem in this typical district of Bangladesh, which is largely generalisable. Interventions at community level with special attention to the socioeconomically deprived are warranted. © 2016 Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited.


Mashreky S.R.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | Mashreky S.R.,Karolinska Institutet | Rahman A.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | Khan T.F.,Center for Medical Education | And 3 more authors.
Burns | Year: 2010

To explore the epidemiology of childhood electrocution in Bangladesh, a population-based cross-sectional survey was conducted between January and December 2003. Nationally representative data was collected from 171,366 rural and urban households, comprising of a total population of 819,429. The average incidence rate of non-fatal childhood electrocution was 53.2 per 100,000 population-year. The rate was found to be significantly higher (p = .000) among male children compared to the females which was 66.7 and 39.2 per 100,000 population-year, respectively. A significantly higher rate of electrocution was found in rural areas compared to urban (p = 0.000). The average child death rate due to electrocution was 1.42 per 100,000 population-year. More than two-thirds of the total childhood electrocution took place at home and 69% electrocution cases were from a domestic source of electricity. Younger children, specifically males are more vulnerable to electrocution. Rural children are at higher risk compared to urban. Home is the most common place of childhood electrocution. A national strategy and prevention program is necessary to address morbidity and mortality of children due to electrocution. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.


Mashreky S.R.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | Rahman A.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | Khan T.F.,Center for Medical Education | Rahman F.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh
Injury | Year: 2012

This study was designed to document the consequences of electrical injury in Bangladesh. A community-based cross-sectional survey was conducted from January to December 2003. Nationally representative data were collected from 171,366 rural and urban households, comprising a total of 819,429 population. Face-to-face interview was chosen as a data collection method. The overall rate of electrical injury was 73.7 per 100,000 population-year. The rate of permanent disability due to electrical injury in Bangladesh was 0.366 per 100,000 population-year. Among the total 604 non-fatal electrical injuries in the survey, 282 (46.7%) had suffered from temporary disabilities for different durations. A total of 172 students were injured from electrical injury and among them 139 (80.8%) missed school for different durations due to their illness. Mean duration of absence from school was 9.72 days (SD ± 10.98), ranging from 1 to 45 days. Among the working people average duration of work loss was 10.56 days (SD ± 14.98), ranging from 1 to 90 days. About 39% of the total patients with electrical injury were contributors to their family income. For each family the expenditure for each seriously injured patient due to electrical injury was USD 271. Electrical Injury is a major cause of morbidity in Bangladesh. It is responsible for significant loss of school days and work days and creating serious health and economic hardship for the inflicted families. A nationwide prevention program needs to be developed to address this problem. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Mashreky S.R.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | Mashreky S.R.,Karolinska Institutet | Rahman A.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | Khan T.F.,Center for Medical Education | And 4 more authors.
Public Health | Year: 2010

Objective: To assess the burden of road traffic injury (RTI) in primary and secondary level hospitals in Bangladesh, and its economic impact on affected families. Study design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: The study was carried out in February and March 2001. To estimate the burden of RTI patients and the length of stay in hospital, the discharge records of primary and secondary level hospitals were used as data sources. Records from 16 district hospitals and 45 Upazila health complexes (subdistrict level hospitals), selected at random, were included in this study. A direct interview method was adopted to estimate the patient costs of RTI; this involved interviewing patients or their attendants. In this study, patient costs included money spent by the patient for medicine, transport, food and lodging (including attendants). Results: Approximately 33% of the beds in primary and secondary level hospitals in Bangladesh were occupied by injury-related patients, and more than 19% of the injury patients had been injured in a road traffic accident. People aged 18-45 years were the major victims of RTI, and constituted 70% of the total RTI-related admissions in primary and secondary level hospitals. More than two-thirds of RTI patients were male. The average duration of hospital stay was 5.7 days, and the average patient cost for each RTI patient was US$86 (5834 BDT). Conclusion: RTI is a major cause of hospital admission in Bangladesh, and represents an economic and social burden for the family and the nation. A national strategy and road safety programme need to be developed to reduce the hospital burden and minimize the economic and social impact. © 2010 The Royal Society for Public Health.


Mashreky S.R.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | Hossain M.J.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | Rahman A.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | Biswas A.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | And 2 more authors.
Injury | Year: 2012

Objectives: The objective of this study is to explore the magnitude and pattern of electrical injury in Bangladesh. Method: A national survey was conducted between January and December 2003 in Bangladesh. Nationally representative data were collected from 171,366 rural and urban households comprising a 819,429 population. The survey was conducted at a household level with a structured questionnaire. Results: The incidence of fatal and non-fatal injury was found to be 1.6 and 73.7 per 100,000 population year respectively. Compared to females, males were found at a higher risk (RR 1.62; 95% CI 1.37-1.91) and rural people found more vulnerable compared to urban people (RR 5.97; 95% CI 4.71-7.57). The home was found as the most common place for electrical injury, with more than 50% of injury taking place at home. The household source of electricity was found as the most common source of electrical injury. Lightning was also found as major source for electrical injury which constituted more than 25% of the injuries cause by electrical current. More than 80% of electrical injuries occurred between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. Conclusion: Electrical injury is an emerging cause of mortality and morbidity in both urban and rural areas of Bangladesh. Males and rural people were the more vulnerable group for electrical injury compared to women and the urban population. The home is the most common place for injury occurrence. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Mashreky S.R.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | Mashreky S.R.,Karolinska Institutet | Rahman A.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | SvanstrOm L.,Karolinska Institutet | And 3 more authors.
Injury | Year: 2011

Objective: The study was designed to explore the epidemiology of burn mortality in Bangladesh. Methods: A population-based cross-sectional survey was conducted between January and December 2003. Nationally representative data was collected from 171,366 rural and urban households, comprising of a total population of 819,429. Results: Overall mortality burn rate was 2.2 per 100,000 populations per year. The rate was higher amongst females. Most of the deaths were accidental in nature, only 5% of deaths were from self-inflected burn. The rate was higher amongst the rural population compared to the urban population. About 90% of the burn incidences were at home with the kitchen the most frequent place at home for burn incidence to occur. A majority, 89%, of the deaths were caused by flame burn. Cooking fire, heating fire and fire from kerosene lamps were the major sources of flames. The majority of burn deaths occurred during winter season. Conclusion: Burn is a considerable cause of death in Bangladesh. Females, rural dwellers and populations of low socioeconomic condition are more vulnerable to burn injury. With simple intervention many of the deaths due to burn can be prevented. Considering the magnitude of the problem it is very important to address it as a public health problem and develop a national burn prevention program. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Halim A.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | Utz B.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | Biswas A.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | Rahman F.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | van den Broek N.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh
BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology | Year: 2014

Verbal autopsy used at community level is an accepted method to identify cause of death and factors contributing to death. Maternal deaths occurring in four districts in Bangladesh over a period of 24 months were identified and community health workers were trained to conduct a verbal autopsy. Of 571 maternal deaths identified almost half (273, 47.8%) occurred at facility level, 97 (17.0%) died en route to a healthcare facility and 201 (35.2%) maternal deaths occurred at home. The majority of maternal deaths occurred in the postpartum period (78.8%) in the first 6 hours after giving birth (41.6% of all postpartum deaths). Women who had accessed care at a healthcare facility were less likely to die in the first 6 hours when compared with women who died at home (relative risk 0.70; 95% confidence interval 0.56-0.88) 70.4% (402) of deaths were classified as direct maternal deaths, 12.4% (71) as indirect and 13.8% (79) as unspecified. The most common cause of death was haemorrhage (38%), followed by eclampsia (20%) and sepsis (8.1%). Almost three out of four women who died had sought care for complications during the index pregnancy. Most mothers who died in Bangladesh had accessed care. It is now crucial that the quality of care received at health facility level is improved. This includes a refocus on strengthening healthcare providers' knowledge and skills to recognise and manage complications and provide emergency obstetric care. The enabling environment must be in place as well as ensuring a fully functional referral pathway between healthcare facilities. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.


Siddiqui M.A.,Rajshahi Medical College | Khan M.A.H.,Rajshahi Medical College | Ahmed S.S.,Rajshahi Medical College | Anwar K.S.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | And 2 more authors.
BMC Research Notes | Year: 2012

Background: Human cutaneous anthrax results from skin exposure to B. anthracis, primarily due to occupational exposure. Bangladesh has experienced a number of outbreaks of cutaneous anthrax in recent years. The last episode occurred from April to August, 2011 and created mass havoc due to its dreadful clinical outcome and socio-cultural consequences. We report here the clinico-demographic profile and treatment outcome of 15 cutaneous anthrax cases attended at the Dermatology Outpatient Department of Rajshahi Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh between April and August, 2011 with an aim to create awareness for early case detection and management. Findings: Anthrax was suspected primarily based on cutaneous manifestations of typical non-tender ulcer with black eschar, with or without oedema, and a history of butchering, or dressing/washing of cattle/goat or their meat. Diagnosis was established by demonstration of large gram-positive rods, typically resembling B. anthracis under light microscope where possible and also by ascertaining therapeutic success. The mean age of cases was 21.4 years (ranging from 3 to 46 years), 7 (46.7%) being males and 8 (53.3%) females. The majority of cases were from lower middle socioeconomic status. Types of exposures included butchering (20%), contact with raw meat (46.7%), and live animals (33.3%). Malignant pustule was present in upper extremity, both extremities, face, and trunk at frequencies of 11 (73.3%), 2 (13.3%), 1 (6.7%) and 1 (6.7%) respectively. Eight (53.3%) patients presented with fever, 7 (46.7%) had localized oedema and 5 (33.3%) had regional lymphadenopathy. Anthrax was confirmed in 13 (86.7%) cases by demonstration of gram-positive rods. All cases were cured with 2 months oral ciprofloxacin combined with flucoxacillin for 2 weeks. Conclusions: We present the findings from this series of cases to reinforce the criteria for clinical diagnosis and to urge prompt therapeutic measures to treat cutaneous anthrax successfully to eliminate the unnecessary panic of anthrax. © 2012 Siddiqui et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Mashreky S.R.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | Rahman F.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh | Rahman A.,Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh
Archives of Suicide Research | Year: 2013

This study set out to explore the epidemiology of suicide in Bangladesh. A cross-sectional study was carried out during 2003 (January to December). This encompassed a population of 819,429 of all age-groups and sexes. Data was collected by face-to-face interviews at a household level. Suicide was found to be the leading cause of death by injury in the age group of 10-19 years. Adolescent females (10-19 year age group) were found to be the most vulnerable. Overall, the suicide rate was 7.3 (95% CI 5.6-9.5) per 100,000 per year and the highest rate was found in the age group of 60+ years. The rate of suicide was found to be 17-fold higher (95% CI 5.36-54.64) in the rural population, compared to urban rates. Adolescent suicide rate in rural areas was 20.1 (95% CI 12.6-31.7) per 100,000. The rate was 17.7 (95% CI 8.6-34.9) and 22.7(95% CI 12-42) among males and females respectively. Poisoning was found as the most frequent method of suicide. The majority of the suicide victims were found to be very poor and illiterate. Suicide is a major public health problem in Bangladesh. Age, place of residence, economic status and literacy were the major associating factors related to suicide. Adolescents, elderly and those residing in rural regions were the most vulnerable groups. © 2013 Copyright International Academy for Suicide Research.


PubMed | Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh
Type: | Journal: BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology | Year: 2014

Verbal autopsy used at community level is an accepted method to identify cause of death and factors contributing to death. Maternal deaths occurring in four districts in Bangladesh over a period of 24months were identified and community health workers were trained to conduct a verbal autopsy. Of 571 maternal deaths identified almost half (273, 47.8%) occurred at facility level, 97 (17.0%) died en route to a healthcare facility and 201 (35.2%) maternal deaths occurred at home. The majority of maternal deaths occurred in the postpartum period (78.8%) in the first 6hours after giving birth (41.6% of all postpartum deaths). Women who had accessed care at a healthcare facility were less likely to die in the first 6hours when compared with women who died at home (relative risk 0.70; 95% confidence interval 0.56-0.88) 70.4% (402) of deaths were classified as direct maternal deaths, 12.4% (71) as indirect and 13.8% (79) as unspecified. The most common cause of death was haemorrhage (38%), followed by eclampsia (20%) and sepsis (8.1%). Almost three out of four women who died had sought care for complications during the index pregnancy. Most mothers who died in Bangladesh had accessed care. It is now crucial that the quality of care received at health facility level is improved. This includes a refocus on strengthening healthcare providers knowledge and skills to recognise and manage complications and provide emergency obstetric care. The enabling environment must be in place as well as ensuring a fully functional referral pathway between healthcare facilities.

Loading Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh collaborators
Loading Center for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh collaborators