Center for Health Outcomes and Population Research

Sanford, United States

Center for Health Outcomes and Population Research

Sanford, United States
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Dippel E.A.,Center for Health Outcomes and Population Research | Hanson J.D.,Center for Health Outcomes and Population Research | McMahon T.R.,Center for Health Outcomes and Population Research | Griese E.R.,Center for Health Outcomes and Population Research | Kenyon D.B.,Center for Health Outcomes and Population Research
Maternal and Child Health Journal | Year: 2017

Objectives American Indian girls have higher teen pregnancy rates than the national rate. Intervention studies that utilize the Theory of Reasoned Action have found that changing attitudes and subjective norms often leads to subsequent change in a variety of health behaviors in young adults. The current study goal is to better understand sexual decision-making among American Indian youth using the Theory of Reasoned Action model and to introduce ways to utilize attitudes and subjective norms to modify risky behaviors. Methods The project collected qualitative data at a reservation site and an urban site through 16 focus groups with American Indian young people aged 16–24. Results Attitudes towards, perceived impact of, and perception of how others felt about teen pregnancy vary between American Indian parents and non-parents. Particularly, young American Indian parents felt more negatively about teen pregnancy. Participants also perceived a larger impact on female than male teen parents. Conclusions There are differences between American Indian parents and non-parents regarding attitudes towards, the perceived impact of, and how they perceived others felt about teen pregnancy. Teen pregnancy prevention programs for American Indian youth should include youth parents in curriculum creation and curriculum that addresses normative beliefs about teen pregnancy and provides education on the ramifications of teen pregnancy to change attitudes. © 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York


Hanson J.D.,Center for Health Outcomes and Population Research | Hanson J.D.,University of South Dakota | Jensen J.L.,Center for Health Outcomes and Population Research | Campbell K.,Bemidji State University | And 3 more authors.
American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research | Year: 2016

The purpose of this research was to determine the prevalence of substance-exposed pregnancies at a hospital in the Great Lakes region of the U.S. Method: Data were collected via retrospective chart abstractions of patients who were seen for delivery at one Great Lakes region hospital during a 1-year period who were given at least one of the International Classification of Diseases codes related to substance use. Results: A total of 342 medical records were included in the analysis, and, while much race/ethnicity data were missing, a large percentage of those in our analysis identified as American Indian. The prevalence of substance-exposed pregnancies at this hospital during a 1-year period was 34.5%. The majority (84.8%) were tobacco users, and many were found to have multiple substance exposures. Also, 48.5% were found to have a mental health diagnosis in addition to substance use. Conclusions: Data from this project can be used in prevention efforts, including preconception care for women at risk for substance use and mental health issues. © Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health.


Griese E.R.,Center for Health Outcomes and Population Research | Kenyon D.B.,Center for Health Outcomes and Population Research | McMahon T.R.,Center for Health Outcomes and Population Research
American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research | Year: 2016

This study examined aspects of the sociocultural context in which American Indian (AI) teen pregnancy occurs, focusing specifically on protective factors for Northern Plains AI youth. Principles of community-based participatory research guided the qualitative data collection from 185 community members (focus groups with AI youth, youth parents, and elders; interviews with health care providers and school personnel) from a reservation and an urban community. Results indicated three protective systems impacted the sexual health and behaviors of AI youth: school, family, and enculturation. These findings provide a better understanding of how specific protective factors within these systems may buffer AI youth from involvement in risky sexual behaviors and work to inform culturally relevant prevention and intervention efforts. © Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health.

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