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Hanson J.D.,Center for Health Outcomes and Population Research | Hanson J.D.,University of South Dakota | Jensen J.L.,Center for Health Outcomes and Population Research | Campbell K.,Bemidji State University | And 3 more authors.
American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research | Year: 2016

The purpose of this research was to determine the prevalence of substance-exposed pregnancies at a hospital in the Great Lakes region of the U.S. Method: Data were collected via retrospective chart abstractions of patients who were seen for delivery at one Great Lakes region hospital during a 1-year period who were given at least one of the International Classification of Diseases codes related to substance use. Results: A total of 342 medical records were included in the analysis, and, while much race/ethnicity data were missing, a large percentage of those in our analysis identified as American Indian. The prevalence of substance-exposed pregnancies at this hospital during a 1-year period was 34.5%. The majority (84.8%) were tobacco users, and many were found to have multiple substance exposures. Also, 48.5% were found to have a mental health diagnosis in addition to substance use. Conclusions: Data from this project can be used in prevention efforts, including preconception care for women at risk for substance use and mental health issues. © Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health.


Griese E.R.,Center for Health Outcomes and Population Research | Kenyon D.B.,Center for Health Outcomes and Population Research | McMahon T.R.,Center for Health Outcomes and Population Research
American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research | Year: 2016

This study examined aspects of the sociocultural context in which American Indian (AI) teen pregnancy occurs, focusing specifically on protective factors for Northern Plains AI youth. Principles of community-based participatory research guided the qualitative data collection from 185 community members (focus groups with AI youth, youth parents, and elders; interviews with health care providers and school personnel) from a reservation and an urban community. Results indicated three protective systems impacted the sexual health and behaviors of AI youth: school, family, and enculturation. These findings provide a better understanding of how specific protective factors within these systems may buffer AI youth from involvement in risky sexual behaviors and work to inform culturally relevant prevention and intervention efforts. © Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health.

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