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Anastas P.,Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering at Yale | Eghbali N.,Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering at Yale
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2010

Green Chemistry is a relatively new emerging field that strives to work at the molecular level to achieve sustainability. The field has received widespread interest in the past decade due to its ability to harness chemical innovation to meet environmental and economic goals simultaneously. Green Chemistry has a framework of a cohesive set of Twelve Principles, which have been systematically surveyed in this critical review. This article covers the concepts of design and the scientific philosophy of Green Chemistry with a set of illustrative examples. Future trends in Green Chemistry are discussed with the challenge of using the Principles as a cohesive design system (93 references). © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Foley P.M.,Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering at Yale | Beach E.S.,Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering at Yale | Zimmerman J.B.,Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering at Yale
Green Chemistry | Year: 2011

Algae are being explored as a sustainable energy feedstock, having potential to reduce dependence on petrofuels and offset greenhouse gas emissions. Economic considerations and principles of green design suggest that if algae-to-fuel technology is to be successful, biofuels must be produced simultaneously with value-added co-products. At present, the algae industry is centered around a limited number of products, such as low-volume/high-value speciality nutrients. New products for medium- and high-volume markets will be needed as biomass production increases in scale. This Perspective highlights non-fuel applications of algal biomass that have received relatively little attention to date but are promising for future development. It is our goal to draw attention to some of the unique opportunities that algae present with respect to biochemical composition as compared to lignocellulosic energy crops. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Foley P.,Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering at Yale | Eghbali N.,Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering at Yale | Anastas P.T.,Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering at Yale
Green Chemistry | Year: 2010

Material and energy inefficiencies in total synthesis can arise from a lack of step economy. Multicomponent syntheses have the potential to optimize step economy and, in turn, to minimize not only waste, but also exposure to hazardous chemicals. Therefore, multicomponent syntheses are of immense interest to the field of Green Chemistry. Herein is described a multicomponent synthesis of arylnaphthalene lignan lactones, which are valuable natural products with promising anticancer and antiviral properties. In an effort to improve our previously reported one-pot, multicomponent synthesis an approach using phenylacetylene, phenylpropargyl chloride, carbon dioxide, catalytic silver iodide, and catalytic 18-crown-6 ether was developed. This methodology was then successfully applied to the preparation of dehydrodimethylconidendrin and its regioisomer, dehydrodimethylretroconidendrin. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Kermanshahi-pour A.,Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering at Yale | Kermanshahi-pour A.,Yale University | Sommer T.J.,Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering at Yale | Anastas P.T.,Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering at Yale | And 4 more authors.
Bioresource Technology | Year: 2014

Carbohydrate composition of the marine microalgae, Tetraselmis suecica was characterized following acidic and enzymatic hydrolysis. Monitoring intracellular starch as a function of cultivation time at varying nitrate concentrations showed a maximum cellular starch content of 45% of dry biomass when grown under nitrate depleted conditions. Characterization of the cell wall methanolysates using GC/MS showed that the monosaccharide composition did not change in response to the nitrate concentration and consisted of 54% 3-deoxy- d- manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo), 17% 3-deoxy- lyxo-2-heptulosaric acid (Dha), 21% galacturonic acid and 6% galactose. Presence of up to 5% Kdo in the dry weight of T. suecica established in this study demonstrates the potential of the cell wall of this species as a feedstock for Kdo, a sugar that is difficult to obtain by chemical synthesis and that has applications in medicinal chemistry. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

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