Center for Forest Mycology Research

Madison, WI, United States

Center for Forest Mycology Research

Madison, WI, United States
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Crous P.W.,Fungal Biodiversity Center | Shivas R.G.,Level Inc | Wingfield M.J.,University of Pretoria | Summerell B.A.,Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust | And 34 more authors.
Persoonia: Molecular Phylogeny and Evolution of Fungi | Year: 2012

Novel species of microfungi described in the present study include the following from Australia: Catenulostroma corymbiae from Corymbia, Devriesia stirlingiae from Stirlingia, Penidiella carpentariae from Carpentaria, Phaeococcomyces eucalypti from Eucalyptus, Phialophora livistonae from Livistona, Phyllosticta aristolochiicola from Aristolochia, Clitopilus austroprunulus on sclerophyll forest litter of Eucalyptus regnans and Toxicocladosporium posoqueriae from Posoqueria. Several species are also described from South Africa, namely: Ceramothyrium podocarpi from Podocarpus, Cercospora chrysanthemoides from Chrysanthemoides, Devriesia shakazului from Aloe, Penidiella drakensbergensis from Protea, Strelitziana cliviae from Clivia and Zasmidium syzygii from Syzygium. Other species include Bipolaris microstegii from Microstegium and Synchaetomella acerina from Acer (USA), Brunneiapiospora austropalmicola from Rhopalostylis (New Zealand), Calonectria pentaseptata from Eucalyptus and Macadamia (Vietnam), Ceramothyrium melastoma from Melastoma (Indonesia), Collembolispora aristata from stream foam (Czech Republic), Devriesia imbrexigena from glazed decorative tiles (Portugal), Microcyclospora rhoicola from Rhus (Canada), Seiridium phylicae from Phylica (Tristan de Cunha, Inaccessible Island), Passalora lobeliaefistulosis from Lobelia (Brazil) and Zymoseptoria verkleyi from Poa (The Netherlands). Valsalnicola represents a new ascomycete genus from Alnus (Austria) and Parapenidiella a new hyphomycete genus from Eucalyptus (Australia). Morphological and culture characteristics along with ITS DNA barcodes are also provided. © 2012 Nationaal Herbarium Nederland & Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures.


Crous P.W.,Fungal Biodiversity Center | Wingfield M.J.,University of Pretoria | Guarro J.,Rovira i Virgili University | Cheewangkoon R.,Chiang Mai University | And 57 more authors.
Persoonia: Molecular Phylogeny and Evolution of Fungi | Year: 2013

Novel species of microfungi described in the present study include the following from South Africa: Camarosporium aloes, Phaeococcomyces aloes and Phoma aloes from Aloe, C. psoraleae, Diaporthe psoraleae and D. psoraleae-pinnatae from Psoralea, Colletotrichum euphorbiae from Euphorbia, Coniothyrium prosopidis and Peyronellaea prosopidis from Prosopis, Diaporthe cassines from Cassine, D. diospyricola from Diospyros, Diaporthe maytenicola from Maytenus, Harknessia proteae from Protea, Neofusicoccum ursorum and N. cryptoaustrale from Eucalyptus, Ochrocladosporium adansoniae from Adansonia, Pilidium pseudoconcavum from Greyia radlkoferi, Stagonospora pseudopaludosa from Phragmites and Toxicocladosporium ficiniae from Ficinia. Several species were also described from Thailand, namely: Chaetopsina pini and C. pinicola from Pinus spp., Myrmecridium thailandicum from reed litter, Passalora pseudotithoniae from Tithonia, Pallidocercospora ventilago from Ventilago, Pyricularia bothriochloae from Bothriochloa and Sphaerulina rhododendricola from Rhododendron. Novelties from Spain include Cladophialophora multiseptata, Knufia tsunedae and Pleuroascus rectipilus from soil and Cyphellophora catalaunica from river sediments. Species from the USA include Bipolaris drechsleri from Microstegium, Calonectria blephiliae from Blephilia, Kellermania macrospora (epitype) and K. pseudoyuccigena from Yucca. Three new species are described from Mexico, namely Neophaeosphaeria agaves and K. agaves from Agave and Phytophthora ipomoeae from Ipomoea. Other African species include Calonectria mossambicensis from Eucalyptus (Mozambique), Harzia cameroonensis from an unknown creeper (Cameroon), Mastigosporella anisophylleae from Anisophyllea (Zambia) and Teratosphaeria terminaliae from Terminalia (Zimbabwe). Species from Europe include Auxarthron longi-sporum from forest soil (Portugal), Discosia pseudoartocreas from Tilia (Austria), Paraconiothyrium polonense and P. lycopodinum from Lycopodium (Poland) and Stachybotrys oleronensis from Iris (France). Two species of Chryso-sporium are described from Antarctica, namely C. magnasporum and C. oceanitesii. Finally, Licea xanthospora is described from Australia, Hypochnicium huinayensis from Chile and Custingophora blanchettei from Uruguay. Novel genera of Ascomycetes include Neomycosphaerella from Pseudopentameris macrantha (South Africa), and Paramycosphaerella from Brachystegia sp. (Zimbabwe). Novel hyphomycete genera include Pseudocatenomycopsis from Rothmannia (Zambia), Neopseudocercospora from Terminalia (Zambia) and Neodeightoniella from Phragmites (South Africa), while Dimorphiopsis from Brachystegia (Zambia) represents a novel coelomycetous genus. Furthermore, Alanphillipsia is introduced as a new genus in the Botryosphaeriaceae with four species, A. aloes, A. aloeigena and A. aloetica from Aloe spp. and A. euphorbiae from Euphorbia sp. (South Africa). A new combination is also proposed for Brachysporium torulosum (Deightoniella black tip of banana) as Corynespora torulosa. Morphological and culture characteristics along with ITS DNA barcodes are provided for all taxa. © 2013 Naturalis Biodiversity Center & Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures.


Gonzalez G.,International Institute of Tropical Forestry | Lodge D.J.,Center for Forest Mycology Research | Richardson B.A.,165 Braid Road | Richardson M.J.,165 Braid Road
Forest Ecology and Management | Year: 2014

In this study, we used a replicated factorial design to separate the individual and interacting effects of two main components of a severe hurricane - canopy opening and green debris deposition on leaf litter decay in the tabonuco forest in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. We quantify changes in percent mass remaining (PMR), the concentration and absolute amounts of various chemical elements using fresh (green) and senesced leaf litter contained in litterbags of two different mesh sizes. Mass loss was significantly slowed by canopy trimming. There was no significant effect of debris treatment on the PMR of the litter. Canopy trimming increased the percent of initial N, Al, Ca, Fe, and Mg remaining and decreased the percent of initial Mn remaining compared with not trimmed plots. Debris addition increased the percent of initial N and P remaining and decreased the percent of initial Al, and Fe remaining in the decomposing litter compared to no debris added plots. Of the elements studied, only Al and Fe accumulated above 100% of initial. Accumulation of Al and Fe in the canopy trimmed and no debris plots. is most likely dominated by the adsorption of these ions onto the surfaces of the decaying litter. Overall, P showed a rapid initial loss during the first 0.2. yr followed by steady loss. Nitrogen was lost steadily from leaf litter. The PMR of fresh and senesced litter was significantly affected by mesh size, with a higher mass remaining in small mesh bags. Fresh litter decayed faster than senesced litter; following patterns of initial N and P concentrations (higher in the former litter type). We found a significantly negative correlation between the Margalef index of diversity for the litter arthropods contained in the litterbags and the PMR, suggesting functional complexity is an important determinant of decay in this forest. Our results imply hurricanes can differentially impact litter decomposition and associated nutrient release via canopy opening and litter inputs. © 2014.


Sanchez-Garcia M.,University of Tennessee at Knoxville | Brandon Matheny P.,University of Tennessee at Knoxville | Palfner G.,University of Concepción | Jean Lodge D.,Center for Forest Mycology Research
Taxon | Year: 2014

The family Tricholomataceae, contained within the Tricholomatoid clade, has traditionally been one of the largest families of the Agaricales. However, in this sense it is highly polyphyletic and requires emendation. Here, we present a phylogeny of the Tricholomatoid clade based on nucleotide sequence data from two nuclear ribosomal RNA genes (large subunit and small subunit) and the second-largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (rpb2). Our aim is to delimit the Tricholomataceae and identify monophyletic groups within the Tricholomatoid clade. We also infer a separate phylogeny, based on the three genes above, in addition to sequences of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacers (ITS), in order to evaluate generic-level boundaries within the Tricholomataceae s.str. Based on this analysis we recover seven monophyletic genera within the Tricholomataceae s.str. that correspond to Leucopaxillus, Tricholoma, Pseudotricholoma stat. nov., Porpoloma s.str., Dennisiomyces, Corneriella gen. nov., and Albomagister gen. nov. Of the 98 genera that have been traditionally assigned to the Tricholomataceae sensu Singer, only four can be placed within it (Tricholoma, Porpoloma, Dennisiomyces, Leucopaxillus). The genus Porpoloma is highly polyphyletic and divided into four genera: Porpoloma s.str., Corneriella gen. nov., Pseudotricholoma stat. nov., and Pogonoloma stat. nov. In all, four new genera are proposed. Taxonomic descriptions, and a key to genera of the Tricholomat­ aceae as emended here are also presented. © International Association for Plant Taxonomy (IAPT) 2014.


PubMed | Center for Forest Mycology Research, University of Florida, Duke University, New York University and Humboldt State University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Mycologia | Year: 2015

Four species of the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) genus Sarcodon (Bankeraceae, Thelephorales, Basidiomycota) are described as new to science. Sarcodon pakaraimensis sp. nov. is described from forests dominated by the ECM trees Pakaraimaea dipterocarpacea (Dipterocarpaceae) and Dicymbe jenmanii (Fabaceae subfam. Caesalpinioideae) in the Pakaraima Mountains of Guyana. Sarcodon portoricensis sp. nov. is described from lower montane wet forest within the El Yunque National Forest of Puerto Rico. Sarcodon quercophilus sp. nov. and Sarcodon umbilicatus sp. nov. are described from Quercus (Fagaceae) cloud forests within the Maya Mountains of Belize. The discovery of these species is significant given that the majority of the approximately 87 described Sarcodon species are north temperate or boreal in distribution and frequently associate with coniferous host plants; these constitute the most recent records for Sarcodon from the greater Neotropics. Each of the new species is morphologically consistent with accepted diagnostic characters for Sarcodon: pileate-stipitate stature, a dentate hymenophore, determinate basidiomatal development, fleshy, non-zonate context and brown, tuberculate basidiospores. DNA (ITS) sequence analysis corroborated the generic placement of S. pakaraimensis, S. portoricensis, S. quercophilus and S. umbilicatus and, along with morphological differences, supported their recognition as distinct species. Macromorphological, micromorphological, habitat and DNA sequence data from the nuc rDNA internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) are provided for each of the new species. A key to Neotropical Sarcodon species and similar extralimital taxa is provided.


Zhou L.-W.,CAS Shenyang Institute of Applied Ecology | Nakasone K.K.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Burdsall H.H.,Center for Forest Mycology Research | Ginns J.,1970 Sutherland Road | And 9 more authors.
Mycological Progress | Year: 2016

Profound changes to the taxonomy and classification of polypores have occurred since the advent of molecular phylogenetics in the 1990s. The last major monograph of North American polypores was published by Gilbertson and Ryvarden in 1986–1987. In the intervening 30 years, new species, new combinations, and new records of polypores were reported from North America. As a result, an updated checklist of North American polypores is needed to reflect the polypore diversity in there. We recognize 492 species of polypores from 146 genera in North America. Of these, 232 species are unchanged from Gilbertson and Ryvarden’s monograph, and 175 species required name or authority changes. In addition, 40 new species and 45 new records published since that monograph are included in the checklist. Among the 492 species of polypores, 486 species from 143 genera belong to 11 orders, while six other species from three genera have uncertain taxonomic position at the order level. Three orders, viz. Polyporales, Hymenochaetales and Russulales, accommodate most of polypore species (93.7 %) and genera (88.8 %). We hope that this updated checklist will inspire future studies in the polypore mycota of North America and contribute to the diversity and systematics of polypores worldwide. © 2016, German Mycological Society and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Sarikaya-Bayram O.,National University of Ireland, Maynooth | Palmer J.M.,Center for Forest Mycology Research | Keller N.,University of Wisconsin - Madison | Braus G.H.,University of Gottingen | Bayram O.,National University of Ireland, Maynooth
Frontiers in Microbiology | Year: 2015

Fungal secondary metabolism has become an important research topic with great biomedical and biotechnological value. In the postgenomic era, understanding the diversity and the molecular control of secondary metabolites (SMs) are two challenging tasks addressed by the research community. Discovery of the LaeA methyltransferase 10 years ago opened up a new horizon on the control of SM research when it was found that expression of many SM gene clusters is controlled by LaeA. While the molecular function of LaeA remains an enigma, discovery of the velvet family proteins as interaction partners further extended the role of the LaeA beyond secondary metabolism. The heterotrimeric VelB-VeA-LaeA complex plays important roles in development, sporulation, secondary metabolism, and pathogenicity. Recently, three other methyltransferases have been found to associate with the velvet complex, the LaeA-like methyltransferase F and the methyltransferase heterodimers VipC-VapB. Interaction of VeA with at least four methyltransferase proteins indicates a molecular hub function for VeA that questions: Is there a VeA supercomplex or is VeA part of a highly dynamic cellular control network with many different partners?. © 2015 Sarikaya-Bayram, Palmer, Keller, Braus and Bayram.


PubMed | Center for Forest Mycology Research, University of Wisconsin - Madison, National University of Ireland, Maynooth and University of Gottingen
Type: | Journal: Frontiers in microbiology | Year: 2015

Fungal secondary metabolism has become an important research topic with great biomedical and biotechnological value. In the postgenomic era, understanding the diversity and the molecular control of secondary metabolites (SMs) are two challenging tasks addressed by the research community. Discovery of the LaeA methyltransferase 10 years ago opened up a new horizon on the control of SM research when it was found that expression of many SM gene clusters is controlled by LaeA. While the molecular function of LaeA remains an enigma, discovery of the velvet family proteins as interaction partners further extended the role of the LaeA beyond secondary metabolism. The heterotrimeric VelB-VeA-LaeA complex plays important roles in development, sporulation, secondary metabolism, and pathogenicity. Recently, three other methyltransferases have been found to associate with the velvet complex, the LaeA-like methyltransferase F and the methyltransferase heterodimers VipC-VapB. Interaction of VeA with at least four methyltransferase proteins indicates a molecular hub function for VeA that questions: Is there a VeA supercomplex or is VeA part of a highly dynamic cellular control network with many different partners?


Baroni T.J.,New York University | Cifuentes J.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Santana B.O.,Center for Forest Mycology Research | Cappello S.,Juarez Autonomous University of Tabasco
North American Fungi | Year: 2015

A new species, Phlebopus mexicanus, is described from southern tropical rainforests of Mexico based on morphological and molecular characters. Several features distinguish this species from others of Phlebopus including the medium to small basidiomata with olivaceous brown tomentose pileus that becomes finely areolate cracked with age, the dark yellow brown pruina covering most of the stipe, the pale yellow flesh of pileus and stipe that slowly turns blue when exposed, and the lack of hymenial cystidia. Phylogenetic analyses using nLSU sequences support the recognition of this new morphological species in the Sclerodermatineae. Our analyses also suggest that P. portentosus and P. marginatus are not conspecific and relationships of Old World taxa of Phlebopus need further scrutiny. A key to all known New World taxa is provided. © 2015 Pacific Northwest Fungi Project. All rights reserved.

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