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Belski R.,University of Western Australia | Belski R.,Center for Food and Genomic Medicine | Belski R.,Royal Perth Hospital Unit | Mori T.A.,University of Western Australia | And 16 more authors.
International Journal of Obesity | Year: 2011

Background:Regular consumption of diets with increased protein or fibre intakes may benefit body weight and composition and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Lupin flour is a novel food ingredient high in protein and fibre.Objective:To investigate the effects of a lupin-enriched diet, during and following energy restriction, on body weight and composition and cardiovascular disease risk factors in overweight individuals.Design:Participants (n131) were recruited to a 12-month parallel-design trial. They were randomly assigned to consume lupin-enriched foods or matching high-carbohydrate control foods. All participants underwent 3 months of weight loss, 1 month of weight stabilization and 8 months of weight maintenance. Body weight and composition and cardiovascular disease risk factors were assessed at baseline, 4 and 12 months.Results:Lupin, relative to control, did not significantly influence (mean difference (95% CI)) weight loss at 4 months (0.1 kg (1.2, 1.4)) and 12 months (0.6 kg (2.0, 0.8)), maintenance of weight loss from 4 to 12 months (0.7 kg (1.83, 0.48)) or measures of body fat and fat-free mass. Relative to control, 24-h ambulatory systolic (1.3 mm Hg (2.4, 0.3), P0.016) and diastolic (1.0 mm Hg (1.9, 0.2), P0.021) blood pressures were lower at 12 months but not at 4 months; fasting insulin concentrations and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) scores were significantly lower at 4 months (1.2 mU l-1 (1.3, 1.1), P0.004 and 0.6 units (1.0, 0.19), P0.004) and 12 months (1.3 mU l-1 (1.4, 1.1), P0.001 and 0.7 units (1.1, 0.24), P0.002).Conclusions:A diet higher in protein and fibre derived from lupin-enriched foods does not enhance weight loss or improve the maintenance of weight loss. However, such a diet may provide cardiovascular health benefits in terms of insulin sensitivity and blood pressure. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.


Jayasena V.,Curtin University Australia | Jayasena V.,Center for Food and Genomic Medicine | Nasar-Abbas S.M.,Curtin University Australia | Nasar-Abbas S.M.,Center for Food and Genomic Medicine
Quality Assurance and Safety of Crops and Foods | Year: 2011

Introduction: The incorporation of protein and dietary fibre rich lupin flour to biscuits has the potential to improve the nutritional value however it may adversely affect the physical and sensory properties. Objectives: To study the effect of lupin flour incorporation on the physical characteristics and sensory properties of biscuits to provide information to the potential manufacturers. Methods: Biscuit samples were prepared by substituting wheat flour with lupin flour at 0-50% levels. The samples were analysed for changes in dimensions, colour, texture and sensory properties. Results: Incorporation up to 40% level had no significant effect on biscuit diameter but thickness increased at ≥ 20%. No change in the L * values of dough and biscuits at ≤ 20% substitution. The a * values of dough decreased with increase in lupin flour concentration but in biscuit no significant change was observed up to 20% substitution. The b * values demonstrated a significant increase at ≤ 20% substitution. Biscuit hardness and fracturability demonstrated an increase with the increase in lupin flour concentration at ≥ 20%. Sensory evaluation revealed an improvement in colour with lupin flour substitution with no significant changes in taste, flavour, texture and overall acceptability up to 20% substitution. Conclusion: Lupin flour can be successfully incorporated into biscuits by replacing up to 20% of wheat flour to increase protein and dietary fibre contents. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Jayasena V.,Curtin University Australia | Jayasena V.,Center for Food and Genomic Medicine | Tah W.Y.,Curtin University Australia | Nasar-Abbas S.M.,Curtin University Australia | Nasar-Abbas S.M.,Center for Food and Genomic Medicine
Quality Assurance and Safety of Crops and Foods | Year: 2014

Soy-lupin tofu samples were prepared by replacing 30% soybean with lupin flour. Four different coagulants, i.e. calcium sulphate, calcium lactate, magnesium sulphate and magnesium chloride, were used at three different concentrations (0.3, 0.4 and 0.5% w/v of the 'milk') to study their effect on yield and quality improvement. The results revealed that the tofu samples prepared using magnesium sulphate had higher moisture content and fresh yield than those prepared from other coagulants. The L*, a*and b* colour coordinates showed no significant differences among the samples. Fat content was affected by the type and concentration of the coagulants. Magnesium sulphate and magnesium chloride at 0.5% level produced tofu with lower fat contents. Protein contents, however, were not affected by type or concentration of coagulant. Texture profile analysis revealed that the hardness and chewiness of samples changed with the type and concentration of the coagulant whereas cohesiveness and springiness were not affected significantly. Sensory evaluation for appearance, colour, flavour, mouthfeel and overall acceptance of the selected samples showed no significant differences. Based on the higher fresh yield magnesium sulphate was found to be a better coagulant for soy-lupin tofu preparation. © 2014 Wageningen Academic Publishers.


Nasar-Abbas S.M.,Curtin University Australia | Nasar-Abbas S.M.,Center for Food and Genomic Medicine | Jayasena V.,Curtin University Australia | Jayasena V.,Center for Food and Genomic Medicine
Quality Assurance and Safety of Crops and Foods | Year: 2012

Introduction: Muffins are popular as breakfast or snack in advanced nations but poor in nutritional value by having low protein and dietary fibre contents. Objectives: To improve the nutritional value of muffins incorporation of protein and dietary fibre rich lupin flour was investigated. Methods: Muffins were prepared by replacing wheat flour with lupin flour at 10 to 50% levels. The sample were store at refrigerated temperature (5±1°C) for 7 days and changes in physicochemical and sensory properties, as affected by lupin flour concentration and storage period, were analysed. Results: Studies on the physical properties revealed that substitution with lupin flour at ≤30% level had no significant effect on the density and height of the muffins. Instrumental colour analysis showed an increase in a* and b* values with increase in lupin substitution. Most of the textural parameters demonstrated a non-significant change at ≤30% lupin flour substitution levels. Sensory evaluation revealed an improvement in colour with up to 30% lupin flour substitution with no significant change in taste, flavour, texture and overall acceptability. Storage period caused substantial changes in the texture of muffins. With moisture content remained unchanged, there was an increase in hardness and a decrease in springiness of all samples including the control. Conclusion: A substantial improvement in nutritional value (increase in protein and dietary fibre content) of muffins could be achieved by replacing wheat flour with lupin flour up to 30% level without any significant loss in physical measurements, textural quality and sensory values. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Jayasena V.,Curtin University Australia | Jayasena V.,Center for Food and Genomic Medicine | Nasar-Abbas S.M.,Curtin University Australia | Nasar-Abbas S.M.,Center for Food and Genomic Medicine
Journal of Texture Studies | Year: 2012

Pasta samples were prepared by substituting semolina with lupin flour at 0-50% levels. Analysis of the physical properties revealed that cooking loss was not affected by lupin flour incorporation. In dried pasta, the color coordinates L *, a * and b * demonstrated a corresponding increase with lupin flour concentration. However, in cooked pasta, L * and b * values did not show any significant change up to 20% lupin flour incorporation. Lupin flour incorporation resulted in substantial increase in protein and dietary fiber contents. Firmness of freshly extruded pasta decreased at ≥20% lupin flour incorporation. However, firmness of cooked pasta was not affected by lupin flour concentration. Stickiness of cooked pasta decreased at ≥30% lupin flour incorporation. There were no significant changes in color, appearance, taste, texture and overall acceptability up to 20% lupin flour incorporation. It can be concluded that nutritional value of pasta can be improved by lupin flour incorporation without any significant effect on quality. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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