Center for Engineering in Medicine

Boston, MA, United States

Center for Engineering in Medicine

Boston, MA, United States
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Berdichevsky Y.,Center for Engineering in Medicine | Berdichevsky Y.,Harvard University | Staley K.J.,Massachusetts General Hospital | Staley K.J.,Harvard University | And 2 more authors.
Lab on a Chip - Miniaturisation for Chemistry and Biology | Year: 2010

Communication between different brain regions, and between local circuits in the same brain region, is an important area of study for basic and translational neuroscience research. Selective and chronic manipulation of one of the components in a given neural pathway is frequently required for development and plasticity studies. We designed an in vitro platform that captures some of the complexity of mammalian brain pathways but permits easy experimental manipulation of their constituent parts. Organotypic cultures of brain slices were carried out in compartments interconnected by microchannels. We show that co-cultures from cortex and hippocampus formed functional connections by extending axons through the microchannels. We report synchronization of neural activity in co-cultures, and demonstrate selective pharmacological manipulation of activity in the constituent slices. Our platform enables chronic, spatially-restricted experimental manipulation of pre- and post-synaptic neurons in organotypic cultures, and will be useful to investigators seeking to understand development, plasticity, and pathologies of neural pathways. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Bhattacharya A.,University of Pittsburgh | Buxton G.A.,Robert Morris University | Usta O.B.,Center for Engineering in Medicine | Balazs A.C.,University of Pittsburgh
Langmuir | Year: 2012

We model the transport of a microscopic particle via a regular array of beating elastic cilia, whose tips experience an adhesive interaction with the particle's surface. At optimal adhesion strength, the average particle velocity is maximized. Using simulations spanning a range of cilia stiffness and cilia-particle adhesion strength, we explore the parameter space over which the particle can be "released", "propelled", or "trapped" by the cilia. We use a lower-order model to predict parameters for which the cilia are able to "propel" the particle. This is the first study that shows how both stiffness and adhesion strength are crucial for manipulation of particles by active cilia arrays. These results can facilitate the design of synthetic cilia that integrate adhesive and hydrodynamic interactions to selectively repel or trap particulates. Surfaces that are effective at repelling particulates are valuable for antifouling applications, while surfaces that can trap and, thus, remove particulates from the solution are useful for efficient filtration systems. © 2012 American Chemical Society.


PubMed | Center for Engineering in Medicine
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Lab on a chip | Year: 2010

Communication between different brain regions, and between local circuits in the same brain region, is an important area of study for basic and translational neuroscience research. Selective and chronic manipulation of one of the components in a given neural pathway is frequently required for development and plasticity studies. We designed an in vitro platform that captures some of the complexity of mammalian brain pathways but permits easy experimental manipulation of their constituent parts. Organotypic cultures of brain slices were carried out in compartments interconnected by microchannels. We show that co-cultures from cortex and hippocampus formed functional connections by extending axons through the microchannels. We report synchronization of neural activity in co-cultures, and demonstrate selective pharmacological manipulation of activity in the constituent slices. Our platform enables chronic, spatially-restricted experimental manipulation of pre- and post-synaptic neurons in organotypic cultures, and will be useful to investigators seeking to understand development, plasticity, and pathologies of neural pathways.

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