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Zhou H.,Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Suzhou Industry Park | Zhou H.,Soochow University of China | Guo Z.-R.,Soochow University of China | Yu L.-G.,Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Suzhou Industry Park | And 5 more authors.
Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice | Year: 2010

Aims: This study evaluates the effectiveness of three metabolic syndrome (MS) criteria in identifying cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the Chinese population. Methods: 3598 subjects were recruited from a cohort study on Prevention of Multiple Metabolic disorders and MS in Jiangsu of China (PMMJS), followed at 6.3 years. MS was diagnosed using criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII), the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and Chinese Diabetes Society (CDS). Cox regression model was used to analysis the association between MS and onset of CVD and T2DM. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, sensitivity and specificity were also used to test the ability of three MS criteria to identify CVD or T2DM. Results: Among three criteria, CDS has the highest specificity but lowest sensitivity. Using the CDS criterion, over 50 percent of patients would be misdiagnosed. ATPIII criterion has the shortest distance in ROC curve, lowest false positive rate and false negative rate for identifying CVD and T2DM. ATPIII+/IDF+ has lower ability to predict CVD than ATPIII+/IDF-ATPIII+/IDF+ and ATPIII+/IDF- has similar ability to predict T2DM. Conclusions: The ATPIII-MS criterion has the highest ability to predict CVD and T2DM. ATPIII is the best MS criterion for the Chinese population. © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Source


Chen D.-H.,Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Suzhou Industry Park | Yu L.-G.,Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Suzhou Industry Park | Xu B.-H.,Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Suzhou Industry Park | Mai F.,Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Suzhou Industry Park
Experimental and Clinical Cardiology | Year: 2014

Dyslipidemia has been investigated as important cardiovascular disease risk factors. Epidemiological data have indicated a continuous increase in prevalence rate of dyslipidemia during the last decades. The exact cause of dyslipidemia is not known. Genetics play an important role on lipid homeostasis. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isotypesare ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors, which have been identified that they play a critical physiological role as lipid sensors and regulators of lipid metabolism. Common variants of the PPARs have been described. However, the associations between PPARs polymorphisms and lipid serum levels in different ethnic populations have revealed conflicting results, suggesting a complex interaction between the PPARs polymorphism and environmental factors. This review will summarize the effect of these common PPARs polymorphisms on dyslipidemia. Source

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