Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Chengdu Military Region

Kunming, China

Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Chengdu Military Region

Kunming, China
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Jiang H.H.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Qin S.Y.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Qin S.Y.,Jilin Agricultural University | Wang W.,Academy of Military Medical science | And 9 more authors.
Veterinary Parasitology | Year: 2014

Toxoplasma gondii can infect a wide variety of warm-blooded animals, including bats. Limited information on T. gondii infection in bats is available in China. The objective of the present study was to determine prevalence and genetic diversity of T. gondii infection in bats in southern China. A total of 608 bats representing 12 species, including 120 Aselliscus stoliczkanus, 59 Myotis chinensis, 11 Miniopterus schreibersii, 53 Rhinolophus affinis, 32 Rhinolophus pusillus, 81 Hipposideros armiger, 28 Hipposideros fulvus, 32 Cynopterus brachyotis, 14 Cynopterus sphinx, 45 Eonycteris spelaea, 109 Hipposideros larvatus, and 24 Taphozous melanopogon, were collected from Yunnan and Guangxi provinces, southern China. They were examined for the presence of T. gondii DNA by amplification of the B1 gene using a nested PCR, and the positive samples were genotyped at 11 genetic loci (SAG1, 5'- and 3'-SAG2, alternative SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1 and Apico) using multilocus polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technology. Fifty-nine (9.7%) of these bats were detected positive by PCR but only five of these positive DNA samples were completely typed at all loci; of which 4 samples, 2 from A. stoliczkanus, and 2 from H. larvatus, belonged to ToxoDB Genotype #10, and the other one from H. larvatus was identified as ToxoDB Genotype #9 ( http://toxodb.org/toxo/). To our knowledge, this is the first report of molecular detection and genetic characterization of T. gondii infection in bats in China. The results show that these bats are potential reservoirs for T. gondii transmission, which may pose a threat to human health. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda, Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Chengdu Military Region and Sichuan Agricultural University
Type: | Journal: Parasite (Paris, France) | Year: 2017

The present review discusses the findings of cryptosporidiosis research conducted in cattle in China and highlights the currently available information on Cryptosporidium epidemiology, genetic diversity, and distribution in China, which is critical to understanding the economic and public health importance of cryptosporidiosis transmission in cattle. To date, 10 Cryptosporidium species have been detected in cattle in China, with an overall infection rate of 11.9%. The highest rate of infection (19.5%) was observed in preweaned calves, followed by that in juveniles (10.69%), postweaned juveniles (9.0%), and adult cattle (4.94%). The dominant species were C. parvum in preweaned calves and C. andersoni in postweaned, juvenile, and adult cattle. Zoonotic Cryptosporidium species (C. parvum and C. hominis) were found in cattle, indicating the possibility of transmission between humans and cattle. Different cattle breeds had significant differences in the prevalence rate and species of Cryptosporidium. This review demonstrates an age-associated, breed-associated, and geographic-related occurrence of Cryptosporidium and provides references for further understanding of the epidemiological characteristics, and for preventing and controlling the disease.


Xu L.,Academy of Military Medical science | Zhang F.,Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Chengdu Military Region | Yang W.,Yunnan Institute of Endemic Diseases Control and Prevention | Jiang T.,Northeast Normal University | And 12 more authors.
Virologica Sinica | Year: 2016

Bats have been implicated as important reservoir hosts of alpha- and betacoronaviruses. In this study, diverse coronaviruses (CoVs) were detected in 50 of 951 (positive rate 5.3%) intestinal specimens of eight bat species collected in four provinces and the Tibet Autonomous Region of China by pan-coronavirus RT-PCR screening. Based on 400-nt RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) sequence analysis, eight belonged to genus Alphacoronavirus and 42 to Betacoronavirus. Among the 50 positive specimens, thirteen gave rise to CoV full-length RdRP gene amplification for further sequence comparison, of which three divergent sequences (two from a unreported province) were subjected to full genome sequencing. Two complete genomes of betacoronaviruses (JTMC15 and JPDB144) and one nearly-complete genome of alphacoronavirus (JTAC2) were sequenced and their genomic organization predicted. The present study has identified additional numbers of genetically diverse bat-borne coronaviruses with a wide distribution in China. Two new species of bat CoV, identified through sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis, are proposed.[Figure not available: see fulltext.] © 2016 Wuhan Institute of Virology, CAS and Springer Science+Business Media Singapore


PubMed | Yunnan Institute of Endemic Diseases Control and Prevention, Northeast Normal University, Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Chengdu Military Region and Academy of Military Medical science
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Virologica Sinica | Year: 2016

Bats have been implicated as important reservoir hosts of alpha- and betacoronaviruses. In this study, diverse coronaviruses (CoVs) were detected in 50 of 951 (positive rate 5.3%) intestinal specimens of eight bat species collected in four provinces and the Tibet Autonomous Region of China by pan-coronavirus RT-PCR screening. Based on 400-nt RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) sequence analysis, eight belonged to genus Alphacoronavirus and 42 to Betacoronavirus. Among the 50 positive specimens, thirteen gave rise to CoV full-length RdRP gene amplification for further sequence comparison, of which three divergent sequences (two from a unreported province) were subjected to full genome sequencing. Two complete genomes of betacoronaviruses (JTMC15 and JPDB144) and one nearly-complete genome of alphacoronavirus (JTAC2) were sequenced and their genomic organization predicted. The present study has identified additional numbers of genetically diverse bat-borne coronaviruses with a wide distribution in China. Two new species of bat CoV, identified through sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis, are proposed.


He B.,Academy of Military Medical science | He B.,Jiangsu Electric Power Company | Zhang F.,Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Chengdu Military Region | Xia L.,Academy of Military Medical science | And 10 more authors.
Archives of Virology | Year: 2015

Bats in Myanmar, Gabon, and Panama have been found to harbor diverse hepadnaviruses. Here, we report a novel hepadnavirus in 4 of 20 pomona roundleaf bats from Yunnan province, China. This virus contains 3,278 nucleotides (nt) in the full circularized genome, with four predicted open frames (ORFs) reading in the same direction. Full genomic sequence comparisons and evolutionary analysis indicate that this virus is a member of a new species within the genus Orthohepadnavirus. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Wien.


Sun H.,Academy of Military Medical science | Wang Y.,Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Chengdu Military Region | Zhang Y.,Academy of Military Medical science | Ge W.,Academy of Military Medical science | And 8 more authors.
Applied and Environmental Microbiology | Year: 2013

We detected Toxoplasma gondii in 29.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 25.5% to 33.1%) of 550 insectivorous bats collected in Myanmar. The genotyping of these positive samples revealed they were closely related to or belong to clonal type I, which is highly virulent in mice, showing that these bats are potential reservoirs for T. gondii transmission. © 2013, American Society for Microbiology.

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