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News Article | April 22, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

This question originally appeared on Quora. Answer by Thomas Snerdley. The Two Bag System. Every pro traveler I've ever met travels light using some variation of this system. Travel bag  [1]: High quality 25 to 40 liter travel pack with (preferably fold-away) hip belt. Clothes, electronics, toiletries, gifts.  Liquids/gels in a quart Ziploc by itself for easy inspection removal. My clothes are rolled up into an Eagle Creek 2-sided travel cube [1a] with a plastic divider in the middle to separate the clean from the unwashed (isolating the smell away from the clean clothes and the rest of the bag) without having to pack two separate clothes bags ... genius!  Always leave the travel bag at least 1/3 empty for souvenirs, and to leave room to carry: Purse/man-bag  or  hiking waist-pack  [2]. Everything you will need to survive up to 18 hours in your airplane, train, boat, bus or tuktuk seat. (e.g., iPad, smartphone, snacks, eyeshade, earplugs, wet wipes, water bottle, etc.) You never have to touch your main travel bag after putting it in the overhead bin (on the opposite side of the aisle, so you can keep eyes on it without having to crane your neck). Going through Security: Put the small bag inside the big bag. Put everything except your picture ID and boarding pass into one of the big bag's zippered pockets and secure it with a heavy duty twist-tie (I use Nite Ize gear ties [3]). Since your Ziploc bag with liquids/gels is in its own pocket (right?) you won't accidentally lose anything taking it out for inspection. After clearing security, it'll take 30 seconds to put the Ziploc bag back in, your shoes back on and be on your way. Walk until you find a nice quiet area of the airport away from potential pickpockets to put everything back in your pants pockets.  Walk by the folks paying $4.50 for a small bottle of water and, without being smug, fill your empty water bottle from a drinking fountain. (Not sure if the water in that country is safe to drink? Use the Center for Disease Control's guidelines for healthy travel water: How do I know what to bring? As you pack your bags, make a text list on your smartphone of everything you pack. On your trip, once in a while when you're bored waiting for a bus or plane go through the list and put a + next to everything you actually used. Next time you travel, don't pack anything without a + next to it.  Even after all these years my travel pack gets a little lighter every time I travel. That's important because if it's too early to check in to a hotel, I can actually walk around town all day with my light pack (with at least 75% of the weight resting on the hip belt, not the shoulder straps!) unlike "overpackers". [4] How do I wash my clothes, for free? In the shower with hotel soap and/or shampoo, while you're still wearing them. That's why world travelers swear by quick-dry Marmot, Icebreaker and Ex-Officio clothing. Start with t-shirt, socks, shorts, undies, then yourself.  After your shower, first wring them out as dry as you can without overly stressing the fabric. Then, lay a hotel towel out on the bed, put one article of clothing on it at a time, roll it up as tightly as possible, then sit on it for a few seconds. [5]  This gets them much drier than hand-wringing alone. Your clothes will now easily air dry overnight draped over the furniture even if there's no fan or A/C. How do I figure out where to stay and what to do, for free? Before you travel:  WIKIVOYAGE or Quora. While you travel: ask people. My personal system is to upload Wikivoyage pages to my Evernote account, which I have set to automatically download to my iPhone so I can use them even with no Internet connection. No muss, no fuss ... How do I make friends in a strange city or country if I don't know anyone and I'm an introvert (that's me!)? Sign up for a several-hour activity of some kind through your hotel, hostel or whoever's offering one. Elephant riding, bamboo raft ride, parasailing, ziplining, hot springs soak, cooking class ... doesn't matter, whatever floats your boat.  You'll inevitably meet people with whom you have something in common, strike up a conversation, and gather serious intel on this location (since they've probably been there a day or two) and lots of other places they just visited that they can't wait to tell you about and show you pictures of themselves standing in front of.    Always remember, the only hard part about travel is buying that first airplane ticket! Everything after that is easy.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

According to Teen Help, there is a death by suicide in the United States every 12.3 minutes. Of these deaths, more than 1,000 are teenagers aged 13 – 18. What’s more, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention says several families are shunned when they’ve lost a child to suicide. John Trautwein, former pitcher with the Boston Red Sox, is all too familiar with the heartbreak and grief that comes with suicide. At age 15, his son, Will, took his own life, which left Trautwein and his family in complete shock. Trautwein discusses his grieving and healing process as well as offering inspiration for other families who have suffered similar losses in his new book, “My Living Will: A Father’s Story of Loss and Hope.” “My Living Will: A Father’s Story of Loss and Hope” tells the story of Trautwein and the unfathomable tragedy which occurred to him and his family when his 15-year-old-son, Will, committed suicide. Having shown no warning signs, signs of depression or anything of the sort, Trautwein and his family were left completely stunned and devastated. While grieving, Trautwein and his family were amazed at the outpour of support from their friends, family and “Life Teammates,” as Trautwein says. It was through this support he received that Trautwein decided to take this tragedy and make it into something positive. Shortly after losing his son, Trautwein, along with his wife, Susie, created the Will To Live Foundation, a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit foundation with the mission of spreading the awareness of teen suicide as well as to increase education around the stigma of mental health. The foundation has been featured on CNN, CBS, FOX Sports and more. Since the foundation’s inception, Trautwein has given more than 100 speeches to parents, coaches and high school and college students alike. “This outlet (the book) is a great way to get people to talk about the issue, which is the ultimate purpose of the Will To Live Foundation,” said Trautwein. “Despite the devastating tragedy we went through, there was an incredible amount of inspirational things that happened to us.” “John Trautwein’s story inspires hope,” said Joe Girardi, manager of The New York Yankees. “It empowers people, and it gives its readers the ‘hope for life.’ Trautwein and Girardi have known each other for several years. They played baseball together at Northwestern University and Girardi wrote the foreword in “My Living Will.” To learn more about Will’s story and The Will To Live Foundation, please visit http://will-to-live.org/. “My Living Will: A Father’s Story of Loss & Hope” By John Trautwein ISBN: 978-1-49085-972-9 (softcover); 978-1-49085-973-6 (hardcover); 978-1-49085-974-3 (electronic) Available at WestBow Press, Amazon and Barnes & Noble About the author John Trautwein is a former pitcher with the Boston Red Sox. Trautwein is a graduate of Northwestern University, where he played college baseball prior to playing seven years in the Expos and Red Sox organizations. He is the president of Source Support Services, a global IT services company and currently lives in Johns Creek, GA with his family.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

According to the Center for Disease Control, 1.25 million people suffer from type 1 diabetes in the US alone. So far, it can only be managed with diet and regular doses of insulin, but scientists at UT Health San Antonio have invented a way of curing the disease in mice that may one day do the same for humans even with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is a particularly unpleasant condition. It occurs when the pancreas ceases to produce the insulin needed by the body to metabolize sugar and, until the invention of artificial insulin injections, it was as deadly as cancer. Type 2 is the less severe form of the disease, where the body produces insufficient insulin; it can often be managed through diet alone. Surprisingly, diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Insulin is made by specialized cells in the pancreas, called beta cells, and sometimes the body's immune system turns against itself and attacks these beta cells, destroying them. Diabetes results when this destruction is over 80 percent. Invented by Bruno Doiron and Ralph DeFronzo, the UT Health technique uses gene transfer to alter cells in the pancreases of mice to make them think they're beta cells and start making insulin. This involves taking selected genes from external beta cells and using viruses as carriers to move them into the new host cells, in the diabetic pancreas. According to DeFronzo, the altered cells then produce insulin, but only in the presence of sugar, which is how a functioning beta cell is supposed to work. Otherwise, the cells would just keep cranking out the hormone, metabolizing all the sugar in the bloodstream and causing hypoglycemia. Only about 20 percent of the lost cells need to be replaced, but if new beta cells are simply introduced, it's likely that the body would attack and destroy them as well. One big advantage of this technique is that it works around the autoimmune system, which ignores the altered cells. "If a type 1 diabetic has been living with these cells for 30, 40 or 50 years, and all we're getting them to do is secrete insulin, we expect there to be no adverse immune response," says DeFronzo. The team emphasizes that there is a large gap between curing diabetic mice and achieving the same in human beings. They say that they'd like to start clinical trials in three years, but more animal testing is needed first at a cost of about US$5 million, as well as making an application to the US Food and Drug Administration for investigational new drug approval. "It worked perfectly," says Doiron. "We cured mice for one year without any side effects. That's never been seen. But it's a mouse model, so caution is needed. We want to bring this to large animals that are closer to humans in physiology of the endocrine system."


The Association is also alarmed by the significantly weaker tax credits compared to current ACA tax credits; the proposed continuous coverage premium penalty; and the proposed changes to Medicaid under this bill. If the AHCA is enacted, each of these elements will have a devastating effect on people with diabetes and will negatively impact their ability to manage their disease. Finally, the legislation repeals the Prevention and Public Health Fund after 2018, eliminating almost 40 percent of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) chronic disease prevention and health promotion budget—a drastic step backwards for diabetes prevention. The AHCA falls short of the minimum standards for an ACA replacement, which the Association outlined and that fellow patient advocacy groups agree are necessary to ensure continued access to health care for those who need it. The Association is discouraged by the passage of the AHCA in the House of Representatives. However, we stand ready to work with the Senate to address the dangerous provisions contained within this bill. We encourage Senators to reject the AHCA and work to improve health care for individuals with diabetes. About the American Diabetes Association More than 29 million Americans have diabetes, and every 23 seconds another person is diagnosed with diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (Association) is the global authority on diabetes and since 1940 has been committed to its mission to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. To tackle this global public health crisis, the Association drives discovery in research to treat, manage and prevent all types of diabetes, as well as to search for cures; raises voice to the urgency of the diabetes epidemic; and provides support and advocacy for people living with diabetes, those at risk of developing diabetes and the health care professionals who serve them. For more information, please call the American Diabetes Association at 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) or visit diabetes.org. Information from both of these sources is available in English and Spanish. Find us on Facebook (American Diabetes Association), Twitter (@AmDiabetesAssn) and Instagram (@AmDiabetesAssn). To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/american-diabetes-association-expresses-extreme-disappointment-in-passage-of-the-american-health-care-act-in-the-house-of-representatives-and-urges-the-senate-to-reject-the-bill-300451848.html


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

LOUISVILLE, Ky.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--In the category of “seeing is believing,” CuVerro® released a video today that pits antimicrobial copper against stainless steel in a side-by-side MRSA-fighting duel. MRSA is an antibiotic-resistant strain of bacteria that the Center for Disease Control believes infects 80,000 hospital patients each year and kills more than 11,000. The video, aptly titled “Super Bugs,” is a composite of tests staged in a laboratory at the University of Southampton in England where an antimicrobial copper surface demonstrates its dominance over the super bug MRSA, virtually wiping out 10 million units of the harmful bacteria in minutes. Meanwhile, on stainless, the bug lives on to infect another day. CuVerro® antimicrobial copper alloys are natural enemies of super bugs and bacteria in general. Research conducted in government and university labs here and abroad show that copper kills 99.9 percent of harmful bacteria like MRSA within two hours of contact. CuVerro is the first copper brand to be registered as a germ-fighter by the EPA. As a result, CuVerro is gaining favor among infection control professionals eager to reduce surface bacteria in the health and fitness industries. Over 300 facilities in the U.S. are using copper sinks, incubators, bed rails, light switch covers, IV poles, dumbbells, etc. to help fight the spread of deadly germs. CuVerro (www.cuverro.com) is manufactured by GBC Metals, LLC, doing business as Olin Brass, a wholly owned subsidiary of Global Brass and Copper, Inc. which is a subsidiary of Global Brass and Copper Holdings, Inc. (NYSE:BRSS), the leading manufacturer and distributor of copper, copper‐alloy and bactericidal copper sheet, strip, plate, foil, rod, ingot and fabricated components in North America and one of the largest in the world. GBC Metals engages in the melting, casting, rolling, drawing, extruding and stamping of specialized copper and copper alloys finished products from scrap, cathode and other refined metals. (OB‐0034‐1510)


As previously announced, AIC is spearheading the launch of a re-engineered version of ADMT's patented, FDA-cleared, proprietary medical device Aurex-3®.  The new Aurex-3 will be regulated as a prescription device to be used for the treatment and control of tinnitus.  It will be exclusively manufactured by ADMT in its FDA-registered medical device manufacturing facility and made available for both national and international distribution.  Management has determined that the addition of a tinnitus prevention product, as contemplated by the arrangement with Otifleks, will expand the activities and revenue potential for AIC. Dr. Mark Brenner, CEO of ADMT subsidiary AIC stated, "We are extremely excited about the potential for a tinnitus prevention technology as part of our offerings from AIC.  The addition of tinnitus preventative products, alongside tinnitus treatment technology, provides an holistic approach to the complex health service challenge that tinnitus presents. Otifleks is an excellent partner to work with in bringing this to the world market, as well as for us to produce revenues with the Otifleks current line of hearing protection products." Tinnitus is an auditory condition, described as the perception of sound in the head, when no outside sound is present.  It is typically referred to as "ringing in the ears." The American Tinnitus Association estimates that there are up to 50 million tinnitus sufferers in the U.S. and some 250 million worldwide. The U.S. Center for Disease Control estimates that nearly 15% of the general public - over 45 million Americans - experience some form of tinnitus. ADMT is a diversified, technology-based developer and manufacturer of innovative technologies and products.  Its core competency is its ability to conceptualize a technology, bring it through development, into manufacturing and commercialization, all in-house.  ADMT has three areas of activity: Medical Device Design, Engineering, Regulatory and Manufacturing Services; Proprietary Electronic Medical Devices; and Eco-Friendly, Water-Based Formulations.  ADMT's multi-disciplinary team of engineers, researchers and technologists utilize advanced technology infrastructure, such as 3-D prototyping, precision instrumentation and specialized software and peripherals, for the research, development and commercialization of diversified technologies. Additional information is available at the Company's websites - admtronics.com and concepttoquantity.com. Except for historical information contained herein, the matters set forth in this news release are "forward looking" statements (as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995), including statements regarding future revenue growth and performance.  Although ADMT believes the expectations reflected in such forward looking statements are based upon reasonable assumptions, there can be no assurance that its expectations will be realized. Forward looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from expectations.  Factors that could contribute to such differences include those described from time to time in ADMT's filings with the SEC, news releases and other communications. The Company assumes no obligation to update the information contained in this news release. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/adm-tronics-subsidiary-joins-with-otifleks-to-develop-proprietary-tinnitus-prevention-technology-300451770.html


RADNOR, Pa.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Lincoln Financial Group (NYSE: LNC) and Munich Re announced today a partnership that creates new life insurance opportunities for millions of Americans afflicted with hepatitis C. In light of recent medical advancements, Lincoln has partnered with Munich Re to offer more favorable underwriting ratings for most individuals with hepatitis C who have been successfully treated, resulting in lower costs for life insurance coverage. In addition, Lincoln Financial is also able to expand coverage eligibility for some untreated individuals. “Lincoln is excited to partner with Munich Re to make the important protections of life insurance more attainable and affordable for those with hepatitis C,” said Mike Burns, senior vice president of Life Solutions at Lincoln Financial Group. “This leading-edge collaboration is a milestone for our industry, and it represents a significant step-forward in helping many people with this disease overcome some of the financial planning challenges they may have previously faced due to associated long-term health problems.” According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), approximately 2.7 - 3.9 million people in the United States have chronic hepatitis C, which can lead to liver damage, cirrhosis and liver cancer. Most people do not know they have the disease, which is primarily spread through contact with blood from an infected person. “The treatment of the hepatitis C virus infection has evolved significantly in recent years with the development of direct-acting viral medications resulting in shorter treatment duration, fewer side effects and improved cure rates,” said Dr. John Greene, vice president and chief medical director at Lincoln Financial Group. “Lincoln and Munich Re have made it a priority to incorporate the newest clinical information about these medical advancements in our underwriting approach, which has resulted in improved or new life insurance opportunities for those with the disease.” Bill Moore, vice president of Underwriting and Medical for Munich Re, commented, “The incredible strides that have been made in treating hepatitis C are making it possible to take a focused, proactive approach to providing innovative coverage for individuals living with hepatitis C. We constantly monitor medical advancements not only in the U.S., but around the world, to help our customers expand their customer base and we are delighted to partner with Lincoln Financial Group in this effort.” These new life insurance opportunities include both Lincoln Financial Group term and permanent policies with coverage up to $20 million, depending on age and rating class. Lincoln to Provide Baby Boomers Applying for a Lincoln policy with Hepatitis C Testing and Results In addition to partnering with Munich Re, Lincoln is teaming with its lab vendors to provide hepatitis C testing throughout 2017 to baby boomers applying for a Lincoln life insurance policy. Results will be available to the applicants, providing peace of mind for those testing negative, and helping those who are unknowingly afflicted find out so that they can pursue treatment. The CDC recommends that everyone born from 1945–1965 get tested for the disease, as this portion of the population is five times more likely to have hepatitis C than other adults. Lincoln Financial Group provides advice and solutions that help empower people to take charge of their financial lives with confidence and optimism. Today, more than 17 million customers trust our retirement, insurance and wealth protection expertise to help address their lifestyle, savings and income goals, as well as to guard against long-term care expenses. Headquartered in Radnor, Pennsylvania, Lincoln Financial Group is the marketing name for Lincoln National Corporation (NYSE:LNC) and its affiliates. The company had $236 billion in assets under management as of March 31, 2017. Learn more at: www.LincolnFinancial.com. Find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube. To sign up for email alerts, please visit our Newsroom at http://newsroom.lfg.com. Munich American Reassurance Company—Munich Re, U.S. (Life), founded in 1959, is one of the largest reinsurers in the U.S. offering life and disability reinsurance to insurance companies throughout the United States. The company also writes group, credit and other reinsurance products. Headquartered in Atlanta, with offices in Chicago and New York, the company is licensed, accredited or authorized in all fifty states; Washington, D.C.; Guam; and Puerto Rico. Munich Re stands for exceptional solution-based expertise, consistent risk management, financial stability and client proximity. This is how Munich Re creates value for clients, shareholders and staff. In the financial year 2016, the Group – which combines primary insurance and reinsurance under one roof – achieved a profit of €2.6bn. It operates in all lines of insurance, with over 43,000 employees throughout the world. With premium income of around €28bn from reinsurance alone, it is one of the world’s leading reinsurers. Especially when clients require solutions for complex risks, Munich Re is a much sought-after risk carrier. Its primary insurance operations are concentrated mainly in ERGO, one of the leading insurance groups in Germany and Europe. ERGO is represented in over 30 countries worldwide and offers a comprehensive range of insurances, provision products and services. In 2016, ERGO posted premium income of €16.0bn. Munich Re’s global investments (excluding insurance-related investments) amounting to €219bn are managed by MEAG, which also makes its competence available to private and institutional investors outside the Group.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. – Peer-reviewed guidelines from the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS) has disclosed that despite scientific studies, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) dismiss any existence of chronic Lyme disease. Kenneth B. Liegner, M.D. has compiled into a single volume a compelling argument that the disease does exist in his book, “In the Crucible of Chronic Lyme Disease” (published by Xlibris). The Bohlsen Group writes a review of the book, saying, this body of work includes scientific articles, speeches and presentations, correspondence with legislators and principals in the field and photographs of persons important in the history of the disease. It illustrates a rational, ethical and scientifically based approach to care of persons suffering from this still incompletely understood illness. “We are in the midst of paradigm change,” Dr. Liegner said. “Improved methods of diagnosis, treatment and prevention are urgently needed.” Liegner has spent more than 25 years working with Lyme and and tick-borne diseases has personally cared for many patients suffering from chronic Lyme disease. He calls for a "Manhattan Project" for better diagnosis, treatment and prevention of Lyme disease and other tickborne diseases, and advocates for physician autonomy and patient rights. “It took medical science roughly 500 years to gain a good understanding of syphilis,” Liegner said. “We are but 40 years in to Lyme disease, caused by a spirochete considerably more genetically complex than Treponema pallidum, the organism causing syphilis.” “In the Crucible of Chronic Lyme Disease: Collected Writings & Associated Materials” By Kenneth B. Liegner, M.D. Hardcover | 6 x 9in | 892 pages | ISBN 9781503587366 Softcover | 6 x 9in | 892 pages | ISBN 9781503587373 E-Book | 892 pages | ISBN 9781503587359 Available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble About the Author Kenneth B. Liegner, M.D. is a board certified internist with training in pathology and critical care medicine. He holds the first U.S. patent proposing application of acaricide to deer for area-wide control of deer-tick populations to reduce Lyme disease. Currently, he acts as a member of the board of directors of International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS), a member of the professional & scientific advisory board of The Lyme Disease Association, Inc. and a member of the American Physicians and Surgeons. His private practice is located in Pawling. Xlibris Publishing, an Author Solutions, LLC imprint, is a self-publishing services provider created in 1997 by authors, for authors. By focusing on the needs of creative writers and artists and adopting the latest print-on-demand publishing technology and strategies, we provide expert publishing services with direct and personal access to quality publication in hardcover, trade paperback, custom leather-bound and full-color formats. To date, Xlibris has helped to publish more than 60,000 titles. For more information, visit xlibris.com or call 1-888-795-4274 to receive a free publishing guide. Follow us @XlibrisPub on Twitter for the latest news.


The feasibility and acceptability of Internet-based sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing have been demonstrated; however, few programs have included testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In British Columbia, Canada, a new initiative will offer online access to chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, and HIV testing, integrated with existing clinic-based services. We presented the model to gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM) and existing clinic clients through a series of focus groups. To identify perceived benefits, concerns, and expectations of a new model for Internet-based STI and HIV testing among potential end users. Participants were recruited through email invitations, online classifieds, and flyers in STI clinics. A structured interview guide was used. Focus groups were audio recorded, and an observer took detailed field notes. Analysts then listened to audio recordings to validate field notes. Data were coded and analyzed using a scissor-and-sort technique. In total, 39 people participated in six focus groups. Most were MSM, and all were active Internet users and experienced with STI/HIV testing. Perceived benefits of Internet-based STI testing included anonymity, convenience, and client-centered control. Salient concerns were reluctance to provide personal information online, distrust of security of data provided online, and the need for comprehensive pretest information and support for those receiving positive results, particularly for HIV. Suggestions emerged for mitigation of these concerns: provide up-front and detailed information about the model, ask only the minimal information required for testing, give positive results only by phone or in person, and ensure that those testing positive are referred for counseling and support. End users expected Internet testing to offer continuous online service delivery, from booking appointments, to transmitting information to the laboratory, to getting prescriptions. Most participants said they would use the service or recommend it to others. Those who indicated they would be unlikely to use it generally either lived near an STI clinic or routinely saw a family doctor with whom they were comfortable testing. Participants expected that the service would provide the greatest benefit to individuals who do not already have access to sensitive sexual health services, are reluctant to test due to stigma, or want to take immediate action (eg, because of a recent potential STI/HIV exposure). Internet-based STI/HIV testing has the potential to reduce barriers to testing, as a complement to existing clinic-based services. Trust in the new online service, however, is a prerequisite to client uptake and may be engendered by transparency of information about the model, and by accounting for concerns related to confidentiality, data usage, and provision of positive (especially HIV) results. Ongoing evaluation of this new model will be essential to its success and to the confidence of its users.

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