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News Article | April 22, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

This question originally appeared on Quora. Answer by Thomas Snerdley. The Two Bag System. Every pro traveler I've ever met travels light using some variation of this system. Travel bag  [1]: High quality 25 to 40 liter travel pack with (preferably fold-away) hip belt. Clothes, electronics, toiletries, gifts.  Liquids/gels in a quart Ziploc by itself for easy inspection removal. My clothes are rolled up into an Eagle Creek 2-sided travel cube [1a] with a plastic divider in the middle to separate the clean from the unwashed (isolating the smell away from the clean clothes and the rest of the bag) without having to pack two separate clothes bags ... genius!  Always leave the travel bag at least 1/3 empty for souvenirs, and to leave room to carry: Purse/man-bag  or  hiking waist-pack  [2]. Everything you will need to survive up to 18 hours in your airplane, train, boat, bus or tuktuk seat. (e.g., iPad, smartphone, snacks, eyeshade, earplugs, wet wipes, water bottle, etc.) You never have to touch your main travel bag after putting it in the overhead bin (on the opposite side of the aisle, so you can keep eyes on it without having to crane your neck). Going through Security: Put the small bag inside the big bag. Put everything except your picture ID and boarding pass into one of the big bag's zippered pockets and secure it with a heavy duty twist-tie (I use Nite Ize gear ties [3]). Since your Ziploc bag with liquids/gels is in its own pocket (right?) you won't accidentally lose anything taking it out for inspection. After clearing security, it'll take 30 seconds to put the Ziploc bag back in, your shoes back on and be on your way. Walk until you find a nice quiet area of the airport away from potential pickpockets to put everything back in your pants pockets.  Walk by the folks paying $4.50 for a small bottle of water and, without being smug, fill your empty water bottle from a drinking fountain. (Not sure if the water in that country is safe to drink? Use the Center for Disease Control's guidelines for healthy travel water: How do I know what to bring? As you pack your bags, make a text list on your smartphone of everything you pack. On your trip, once in a while when you're bored waiting for a bus or plane go through the list and put a + next to everything you actually used. Next time you travel, don't pack anything without a + next to it.  Even after all these years my travel pack gets a little lighter every time I travel. That's important because if it's too early to check in to a hotel, I can actually walk around town all day with my light pack (with at least 75% of the weight resting on the hip belt, not the shoulder straps!) unlike "overpackers". [4] How do I wash my clothes, for free? In the shower with hotel soap and/or shampoo, while you're still wearing them. That's why world travelers swear by quick-dry Marmot, Icebreaker and Ex-Officio clothing. Start with t-shirt, socks, shorts, undies, then yourself.  After your shower, first wring them out as dry as you can without overly stressing the fabric. Then, lay a hotel towel out on the bed, put one article of clothing on it at a time, roll it up as tightly as possible, then sit on it for a few seconds. [5]  This gets them much drier than hand-wringing alone. Your clothes will now easily air dry overnight draped over the furniture even if there's no fan or A/C. How do I figure out where to stay and what to do, for free? Before you travel:  WIKIVOYAGE or Quora. While you travel: ask people. My personal system is to upload Wikivoyage pages to my Evernote account, which I have set to automatically download to my iPhone so I can use them even with no Internet connection. No muss, no fuss ... How do I make friends in a strange city or country if I don't know anyone and I'm an introvert (that's me!)? Sign up for a several-hour activity of some kind through your hotel, hostel or whoever's offering one. Elephant riding, bamboo raft ride, parasailing, ziplining, hot springs soak, cooking class ... doesn't matter, whatever floats your boat.  You'll inevitably meet people with whom you have something in common, strike up a conversation, and gather serious intel on this location (since they've probably been there a day or two) and lots of other places they just visited that they can't wait to tell you about and show you pictures of themselves standing in front of.    Always remember, the only hard part about travel is buying that first airplane ticket! Everything after that is easy.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

LOUISVILLE, Ky.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--In the category of “seeing is believing,” CuVerro® released a video today that pits antimicrobial copper against stainless steel in a side-by-side MRSA-fighting duel. MRSA is an antibiotic-resistant strain of bacteria that the Center for Disease Control believes infects 80,000 hospital patients each year and kills more than 11,000. The video, aptly titled “Super Bugs,” is a composite of tests staged in a laboratory at the University of Southampton in England where an antimicrobial copper surface demonstrates its dominance over the super bug MRSA, virtually wiping out 10 million units of the harmful bacteria in minutes. Meanwhile, on stainless, the bug lives on to infect another day. CuVerro® antimicrobial copper alloys are natural enemies of super bugs and bacteria in general. Research conducted in government and university labs here and abroad show that copper kills 99.9 percent of harmful bacteria like MRSA within two hours of contact. CuVerro is the first copper brand to be registered as a germ-fighter by the EPA. As a result, CuVerro is gaining favor among infection control professionals eager to reduce surface bacteria in the health and fitness industries. Over 300 facilities in the U.S. are using copper sinks, incubators, bed rails, light switch covers, IV poles, dumbbells, etc. to help fight the spread of deadly germs. CuVerro (www.cuverro.com) is manufactured by GBC Metals, LLC, doing business as Olin Brass, a wholly owned subsidiary of Global Brass and Copper, Inc. which is a subsidiary of Global Brass and Copper Holdings, Inc. (NYSE:BRSS), the leading manufacturer and distributor of copper, copper‐alloy and bactericidal copper sheet, strip, plate, foil, rod, ingot and fabricated components in North America and one of the largest in the world. GBC Metals engages in the melting, casting, rolling, drawing, extruding and stamping of specialized copper and copper alloys finished products from scrap, cathode and other refined metals. (OB‐0034‐1510)


Bounce has produced a series of Public Service Announcements featuring Olympic medalist Maritza Correia McClendon, who made history as the first black woman to earn a place on the United States Olympic Swim Team and went on to become the first to earn an Olympic medal (2004 Athens). The PSAs encourage water and pool safety and include direction to information on the YMCA's "Safety Around Water" program. Bounce will air the spots nationally starting Memorial Day Weekend and is sharing them with affiliates to run them locally on their primary channels. Click here to watch the PSA. The effort will also be spread via social media with Bounce and Black Kids Swim providing the spots and editorial content promoting the initiative that include links to the YMCA's "Safety Around Water" program. "Lack of proper water training and preparation is quietly killing African Americans of all ages. We think it is important to help educate people on water safety, especially as we head into another summer season," commented Bounce Vice President of Community Outreach Jeff  "J.J." Johnson. People can stay connected with the initiative by following Bounce's official Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts (@bouncetv) and by visiting . Black Kids Swim will also share information on their Facebook page and on Twitter (@BlackKidsSwim). Bounce is the fastest-growing African-American network on television and airs on the broadcast signals of local television stations and corresponding cable carriage. The network is available in more than 94 million homes across the United States and 93% of all African-American television homes, including all the top AA television markets. *USA Swimming Foundation/University of Memphis **Center for Disease Control and Prevention To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/bounce-the-ymca-and-black-kids-swim-team-for-new-water-safety-public-service-initiative-300464101.html


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Connected device startup Konnected Widgets is tackling the common, yet preventable public health problem of foodborne illness caused by undercooking with the K-Mometer(TM), a smart Wi-Fi thermometer that can remotely monitor the internal temperature of food while it cooks, and report the temperature on your smart phone or tablet. Each year in the United States alone, 1 in 6 Americans contract foodborne illness, and the Center for Disease Control estimates it affects 48 million people each year, with 128,000 hospitalized and 3,000 fatalities. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, using a food thermometer is the only way to verify that food has reached a safe minimum internal temperature where any harmful bacteria is destroyed, and is the only way to prevent foodborne illnesses due to undercooking. “Our mission is to make connected devices that are affordable and solve real world challenges, such as foodborne illness due to undercooking, a severely underestimated public health issue”, said Founder and CEO, Zin Thein Kyaw. “The K-Mometer will not only help people cook safely, but also cook perfectly, at an affordable price.” The K-Mometer is unique in its class, offering standard Wi-Fi connectivity, an integrated industry standard Type K thermocouple sensor, and probe, at an affordable price. The Type K thermocouple allows it to sense very high heat temperatures for up to 8 hours, making it possible to cook a turkey or smoke BBQ meats from start to finish. Competitor devices use probes that are susceptible to moisture damage after repeated exposure to high heat, and some probe cables will even melt in the process, making it costly in terms of time and money for the consumer to keep replacing them. The K-Mometer features extended range via Wi-Fi, allowing users to continue to do what they need to do around the house without having to be in range of what they are cooking. “We designed in Wi-Fi from the beginning so that you can continue the rest of your meal preparation or entertain guests without missing a beat. As long as your phone or tablet has access to Wi-Fi you will know exactly how your food is doing.” The K-Mometer can now be pre-ordered via its Indiegogo campaign for US$79, and is shipping Fall 2017. The first 250 backers will receive it an early bird price of US$69.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"Our collaboration with Peerbridge Health is part of our overarching strategy to introduce disruptive technologies that will help shape the future of health care delivery," said Michael Dowling, president and CEO of Northwell Health. To better understand the potential of this partnership, Peerbridge Health and Northwell conducted a clinical trial to measure the performance of the company's flagship product, the Peerbridge Cor™, a compact, lightweight, multi-channel electrocardiogram monitor. To ensure efficacy, the Peerbridge Cor was compared to other cardiovascular monitors in a clinical trial. "The trial demonstrated this technology was superior to the current Holter Monitor standard," said Nicholas Skipitaris, MD, chief of electrophysiology at Lenox Hill Hospital. "Not only did the Peerbridge Cor deliver excellent, multi-channel, analyzable data, but it delivered less motion artifact and fewer false positives, despite our patient's active New York lifestyle." "Our vision is to help consumers partner with their physicians through easily accessible remote monitoring options," said Arthur Bertolero, CEO of Peerbridge Health. "Northwell has been a strong strategic partner, sharing our passion to bring effective digital solutions to consumers and health professionals with the highest medical standard." Incidence/Cost of Cardiovascular The American Heart Association reports cardiovascular disease and stroke as the top two killers of American adults. Cardiovascular monitoring, both inside and outside medical environments, is critical for diagnosis, proper treatment, and improved outcomes. According to the US Center for Disease Control & Prevention Foundation, annual direct medical costs associated with cardiovascular diseases are projected to rise to more than $818 billion by 2030. To get ahead of the growth in patient demand, an increasing number of providers are looking for more efficient monitoring like Peerbridge to improve treatment and deliver better outcomes, which also has the potential to significantly reduce expenses. About Northwell Health Northwell Health is New York State's largest health care provider and private employer, with 22 hospitals and over 550 outpatient facilities. We care for more than two million people annually in the metro New York area and beyond, thanks to philanthropic support from our communities. Our 61,000 employees – 15,000+ nurses and nearly 3,900 physicians, including about 2,800 members of Northwell Health Physician Partners -- are working to change health care for the better. We're making breakthroughs in medicine at the Feinstein Institute. We're training the next generation of medical professionals at the visionary Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine and the School of Graduate Nursing and Physician Assistant Studies. And we offer health insurance through CareConnect. For information on our more than 100 medical specialties, visit Northwell.edu. About Peerbridge Health Headquartered in New York, NY, Peerbridge Health, Inc. (PBH) is a venture capital backed Health IT and wearable technology company. PBH seeks to improve remote monitoring through thoughtful design and a seamless user experience. The company's current focus is to bring a new freedom and precision to remote cardiac monitoring with its initial product release scheduled for 2017. The company has two digital health and fitness pioneering patents for medical grade monitoring of all vital signs; 7,979,111 and 9,101,264, with other patents pending. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/northwell-health-makes-strategic-move-into-wearable-technology-300462368.html


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.fooddive.com

Scientists and packaging companies have been working for years to develop technology that indicates spoilage in food and beverage products. Several years ago, researchers at the University of Rhode Island came up with heat-sensing UPC codes that would change color when a fresh product became too warm, indicating contamination. In 2014, Chinese researchers developed corn kernel-sized tags that could attach to packaging and change color when spoilage was present. These efforts, along with others, have yet to reach commercial viability since special sensors can be difficult to replicate in mass quantities, and at a cost that’s agreeable to manufacturers. For now, food and beverage companies rely on various “best by” and “sell by” claims to indicate product freshness. But these claims have proven to be a headache for consumers who have a hard time figuring out what many of them mean. What does a “better if used by” date indicate? Does a “sell by” date point out when a product will spoil? In fact, these dates indicate product quality rather than product safety; federal law only requires that baby food contain a spoilage date. In the absence of clear instructions, many consumers simply throw out food that’s nearing or has reached its on-pack date. This creates vast amounts of food waste, according to organizations like the Natural Resources Defense Council, which estimates that people throw out a billion pounds of food each year due to label confusion. Developing clearer labels, organizations estimate, could reduce food waste in the U.S. by as much as 8%. Regulators and industry groups are working towards this goal. In December, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and its Food Safety and Inspection Service recommended that manufacturers only use a “best if used by” label on meat, dairy and other fresh food packaging. The Food Marketing Institute and the Grocery Manufacturers Association, meanwhile, recommend two labels: “BEST If Used By" to signify product quality and "USE by" to indicate the safety of perishable products. Each year, 1 in 6 Americans gets sick by consuming contaminated foods or beverages, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Some of these illnesses, likely caused by eating spoiled food, could be prevented with packaging that alerts the consumer.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.fooddive.com

Scientists and packaging companies have been working for years to develop technology that indicates spoilage in food and beverage products. Several years ago, researchers at the University of Rhode Island came up with heat-sensing UPC codes that would change color when a fresh product became too warm, indicating contamination. In 2014, Chinese researchers developed corn kernel-sized tags that could attach to packaging and change color when spoilage was present. These efforts, along with others, have yet to reach commercial viability since special sensors can be difficult to replicate in mass quantities, and at a cost that’s agreeable to manufacturers. For now, food and beverage companies rely on various “best by” and “sell by” claims to indicate product freshness. But these claims have proven to be a headache for consumers who have a hard time figuring out what many of them mean. What does a “better if used by” date indicate? Does a “sell by” date point out when a product will spoil? In fact, these dates indicate product quality rather than product safety; federal law only requires that baby food contain a spoilage date. In the absence of clear instructions, many consumers simply throw out food that’s nearing or has reached its on-pack date. This creates vast amounts of food waste, according to organizations like the Natural Resources Defense Council, which estimates that people throw out a billion pounds of food each year due to label confusion. Developing clearer labels, organizations estimate, could reduce food waste in the U.S. by as much as 8%. Regulators and industry groups are working towards this goal. In December, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and its Food Safety and Inspection Service recommended that manufacturers only use a “best if used by” label on meat, dairy and other fresh food packaging. The Food Marketing Institute and the Grocery Manufacturers Association, meanwhile, recommend two labels: “BEST If Used By" to signify product quality and "USE by" to indicate the safety of perishable products. Each year, 1 in 6 Americans gets sick by consuming contaminated foods or beverages, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Some of these illnesses, likely caused by eating spoiled food, could be prevented with packaging that alerts the consumer.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Hepatitis C infections among pregnant women nearly doubled from 2009-2014, likely a consequence of the country's increasing opioid epidemic that is disproportionately affecting rural areas of states including Tennessee and West Virginia. Injection drug use is the main risk factor for the hepatitis C virus, now the country's most common blood-borne infection with an estimated 3.5 million people living with chronic infection. "We have seen a dramatic increase in opioid use in pregnancy and in the number of infants having drug withdrawal," said lead author Stephen Patrick, M.D., assistant professor of Pediatrics and Health Policy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. "Taken together, this suggests that efforts targeted at preventing and expanding treatment for opioid use disorder may help mitigate some of the increases we see," Patrick said. Patrick co-authored a study with the Tennessee Department of Health (TDH) that was released today in the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's weekly epidemiological digest Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). Hepatitis C infection present at the time of delivery increased 89 percent, from 1.8 to 3.4 per 1,000 live births from 2009-2014, equaling 35 infants a day exposed to the virus. Authors reported notable increases in rural counties in Tennessee and in rural states like West Virginia, which had the highest infection rate in 2014 (22.6 per 1,000 live births). "We found substantial state-to-state variation in hepatitis C infection rates," Patrick said. "West Virginia had the highest prevalence of infection among pregnant women ¬-- 1 in 50 newborns were exposed to the virus." In Tennessee, the odds of a hepatitis C infection at birth were approximately threefold higher for women residing in rural counties, 4.5-fold higher for women who smoked cigarettes during pregnancy, and nearly seventeenfold higher for women with concurrent hepatitis B virus infection. Tennessee had 10.1 hepatitis C infections per 1,000 live births in 2014. "We found that rural and Appalachian counties were particularly impacted by the virus," Patrick said. "In some counties in Tennessee, nearly 8 percent of pregnant women were documented as being infected with hepatitis C at the time of delivery." Senior author and TDH Medical Director for HIV, STD & Viral Hepatitis Carolyn Wester, M.D, said the increase highlights the importance of ensuring that women of childbearing age have access to hepatitis C testing and treatment. Patrick agreed, noting that women who know they have the virus before pregnancy can be treated to hopefully clear the virus prior to becoming pregnant. He also said that it is increasingly important that infants exposed to hepatitis C are monitored to see if they get the virus. "We need to build systems of care to ensure that all infants exposed to the virus are adequately followed," Patrick said. TDH State Epidemiologist Tim Jones, M.D., said the study is an important reminder of the threat of this growing epidemic to high-risk populations throughout the U.S. "While this study focuses on pregnant women and a high-risk area in Tennessee, it is also important to remember that hundreds of thousands of people throughout the U.S. have hepatitis C, and a large percentage of them do not know it," Jones said. "Anyone born between 1945-1965, or who has ever used IV drugs, or is otherwise worried about hepatitis infection, is encouraged to discuss with their clinicians whether testing may be appropriate for them," he said.


Babesia is caused by microscopic parasites and is transmitted primarily through tick bites. However, as the disease is spread during ticks' young nymph stage, many patients are unaware of a tick encounter. There may be no symptoms, or those affected may experience flu-like symptoms. The disease destroys red blood cells and can lead to hemolytic anemia (jaundice and hemoglobinuria). Individuals with compromised immune systems may experience more severe complications. Although widespread, the main concentrations of the disease are found in the Northeastern and Midwestern portions of the U.S., according to the Center for Disease Control (CDC). The latest data from the CDC show more than 1,700 people were affected by Babesia in 2014 with highest concentrations in Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Maine, New Hampshire, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. The Procleix Babesia assay is designed to be a qualitative in vitro nucleic acid screening test for the direct detection of the Babesia parasite in specimens from human blood donors on the fully automated Procleix Panther system platform. This test, developed by Grifols Diagnostic Solutions, Inc., is designed to enable participating blood banks and donor centers in the U.S. to test donations to further safety of their blood supplies. "The availability of the assay under the IND protocol and in collaboration with the FDA marks another important milestone for Grifols," said Grifols Diagnostic Division President, Carsten Schroeder. "As leaders in the NAT blood screening market, we remain committed to preserve the safety of blood donations from the presence of unwanted pathogens. The Procleix Babesia assay will add to our growing portfolio and has been expressly designed to address the needs of the blood banking community." Currently, the majority of blood donations in the U.S. are being tested with the Procleix Zika virus assay (on the Procleix Panther system), released in June 2016 under an IND study. About Procleix NAT Solutions Today, Procleix systems are used to screen more blood donations around the world than any other NAT blood screening products, and include tests for HIV, hepatitis (A, B, C and E) viruses, West Nile virus and more. The Procleix Panther system automates all aspects of NAT-based blood screening on a single, integrated platform. It eliminates the need for batch processing and combines walk-away freedom with intuitive design for ease of use. The system has received regulatory approvals in countries around the world, and is in development for the U.S. market. About Grifols Grifols is a global healthcare company with more than a 75-year legacy of improving people's health and well-being through the development of protein therapies, hospital pharmacy products and diagnostic technology for clinical use. The company is present in more than 100 countries worldwide, with headquarters located in Barcelona, Spain. Grifols is a leader in plasma collection with a network of more than 170 plasma donation centers in the U.S., and is a leading producer of plasma-derived medicines. As a recognized leader in transfusion medicine, Grifols offers a comprehensive range of transfusion medicine, hemostasis, and immunoassay solutions for clinical laboratories, blood banks, and transfusion centers. In 2016, sales exceeded 4,000 million euros with approximately 15,000 employees. Grifols demonstrates its commitment to advancing healthcare by allocating a significant portion of its annual income to R&D. The company's class A shares are listed on the Spanish Stock Exchange, where they are part of the Ibex-35 (MCE: GRF). Its non-voting class B shares are listed on the Mercado Continuo (MCE: GRF.P) and on the U.S. NASDAQ via ADRs (NASDAQ: GRFS). For more information visit www.grifols.com. Procleix is a registered trademark of Grifols Worldwide Operations Limited. Panther is a registered trademark of Hologic, Inc. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/investigational-new-drug-application-is-now-effective-for-babesia-screening-in-blood-donations-using-grifols-procleix-panther-system-in-the-us-300454212.html


The feasibility and acceptability of Internet-based sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing have been demonstrated; however, few programs have included testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In British Columbia, Canada, a new initiative will offer online access to chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, and HIV testing, integrated with existing clinic-based services. We presented the model to gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM) and existing clinic clients through a series of focus groups. To identify perceived benefits, concerns, and expectations of a new model for Internet-based STI and HIV testing among potential end users. Participants were recruited through email invitations, online classifieds, and flyers in STI clinics. A structured interview guide was used. Focus groups were audio recorded, and an observer took detailed field notes. Analysts then listened to audio recordings to validate field notes. Data were coded and analyzed using a scissor-and-sort technique. In total, 39 people participated in six focus groups. Most were MSM, and all were active Internet users and experienced with STI/HIV testing. Perceived benefits of Internet-based STI testing included anonymity, convenience, and client-centered control. Salient concerns were reluctance to provide personal information online, distrust of security of data provided online, and the need for comprehensive pretest information and support for those receiving positive results, particularly for HIV. Suggestions emerged for mitigation of these concerns: provide up-front and detailed information about the model, ask only the minimal information required for testing, give positive results only by phone or in person, and ensure that those testing positive are referred for counseling and support. End users expected Internet testing to offer continuous online service delivery, from booking appointments, to transmitting information to the laboratory, to getting prescriptions. Most participants said they would use the service or recommend it to others. Those who indicated they would be unlikely to use it generally either lived near an STI clinic or routinely saw a family doctor with whom they were comfortable testing. Participants expected that the service would provide the greatest benefit to individuals who do not already have access to sensitive sexual health services, are reluctant to test due to stigma, or want to take immediate action (eg, because of a recent potential STI/HIV exposure). Internet-based STI/HIV testing has the potential to reduce barriers to testing, as a complement to existing clinic-based services. Trust in the new online service, however, is a prerequisite to client uptake and may be engendered by transparency of information about the model, and by accounting for concerns related to confidentiality, data usage, and provision of positive (especially HIV) results. Ongoing evaluation of this new model will be essential to its success and to the confidence of its users.

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