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News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.fooddive.com

Scientists and packaging companies have been working for years to develop technology that indicates spoilage in food and beverage products. Several years ago, researchers at the University of Rhode Island came up with heat-sensing UPC codes that would change color when a fresh product became too warm, indicating contamination. In 2014, Chinese researchers developed corn kernel-sized tags that could attach to packaging and change color when spoilage was present. These efforts, along with others, have yet to reach commercial viability since special sensors can be difficult to replicate in mass quantities, and at a cost that’s agreeable to manufacturers. For now, food and beverage companies rely on various “best by” and “sell by” claims to indicate product freshness. But these claims have proven to be a headache for consumers who have a hard time figuring out what many of them mean. What does a “better if used by” date indicate? Does a “sell by” date point out when a product will spoil? In fact, these dates indicate product quality rather than product safety; federal law only requires that baby food contain a spoilage date. In the absence of clear instructions, many consumers simply throw out food that’s nearing or has reached its on-pack date. This creates vast amounts of food waste, according to organizations like the Natural Resources Defense Council, which estimates that people throw out a billion pounds of food each year due to label confusion. Developing clearer labels, organizations estimate, could reduce food waste in the U.S. by as much as 8%. Regulators and industry groups are working towards this goal. In December, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and its Food Safety and Inspection Service recommended that manufacturers only use a “best if used by” label on meat, dairy and other fresh food packaging. The Food Marketing Institute and the Grocery Manufacturers Association, meanwhile, recommend two labels: “BEST If Used By" to signify product quality and "USE by" to indicate the safety of perishable products. Each year, 1 in 6 Americans gets sick by consuming contaminated foods or beverages, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Some of these illnesses, likely caused by eating spoiled food, could be prevented with packaging that alerts the consumer.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.fooddive.com

Scientists and packaging companies have been working for years to develop technology that indicates spoilage in food and beverage products. Several years ago, researchers at the University of Rhode Island came up with heat-sensing UPC codes that would change color when a fresh product became too warm, indicating contamination. In 2014, Chinese researchers developed corn kernel-sized tags that could attach to packaging and change color when spoilage was present. These efforts, along with others, have yet to reach commercial viability since special sensors can be difficult to replicate in mass quantities, and at a cost that’s agreeable to manufacturers. For now, food and beverage companies rely on various “best by” and “sell by” claims to indicate product freshness. But these claims have proven to be a headache for consumers who have a hard time figuring out what many of them mean. What does a “better if used by” date indicate? Does a “sell by” date point out when a product will spoil? In fact, these dates indicate product quality rather than product safety; federal law only requires that baby food contain a spoilage date. In the absence of clear instructions, many consumers simply throw out food that’s nearing or has reached its on-pack date. This creates vast amounts of food waste, according to organizations like the Natural Resources Defense Council, which estimates that people throw out a billion pounds of food each year due to label confusion. Developing clearer labels, organizations estimate, could reduce food waste in the U.S. by as much as 8%. Regulators and industry groups are working towards this goal. In December, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and its Food Safety and Inspection Service recommended that manufacturers only use a “best if used by” label on meat, dairy and other fresh food packaging. The Food Marketing Institute and the Grocery Manufacturers Association, meanwhile, recommend two labels: “BEST If Used By" to signify product quality and "USE by" to indicate the safety of perishable products. Each year, 1 in 6 Americans gets sick by consuming contaminated foods or beverages, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Some of these illnesses, likely caused by eating spoiled food, could be prevented with packaging that alerts the consumer.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Hepatitis C infections among pregnant women nearly doubled from 2009-2014, likely a consequence of the country's increasing opioid epidemic that is disproportionately affecting rural areas of states including Tennessee and West Virginia. Injection drug use is the main risk factor for the hepatitis C virus, now the country's most common blood-borne infection with an estimated 3.5 million people living with chronic infection. "We have seen a dramatic increase in opioid use in pregnancy and in the number of infants having drug withdrawal," said lead author Stephen Patrick, M.D., assistant professor of Pediatrics and Health Policy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. "Taken together, this suggests that efforts targeted at preventing and expanding treatment for opioid use disorder may help mitigate some of the increases we see," Patrick said. Patrick co-authored a study with the Tennessee Department of Health (TDH) that was released today in the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's weekly epidemiological digest Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). Hepatitis C infection present at the time of delivery increased 89 percent, from 1.8 to 3.4 per 1,000 live births from 2009-2014, equaling 35 infants a day exposed to the virus. Authors reported notable increases in rural counties in Tennessee and in rural states like West Virginia, which had the highest infection rate in 2014 (22.6 per 1,000 live births). "We found substantial state-to-state variation in hepatitis C infection rates," Patrick said. "West Virginia had the highest prevalence of infection among pregnant women ¬-- 1 in 50 newborns were exposed to the virus." In Tennessee, the odds of a hepatitis C infection at birth were approximately threefold higher for women residing in rural counties, 4.5-fold higher for women who smoked cigarettes during pregnancy, and nearly seventeenfold higher for women with concurrent hepatitis B virus infection. Tennessee had 10.1 hepatitis C infections per 1,000 live births in 2014. "We found that rural and Appalachian counties were particularly impacted by the virus," Patrick said. "In some counties in Tennessee, nearly 8 percent of pregnant women were documented as being infected with hepatitis C at the time of delivery." Senior author and TDH Medical Director for HIV, STD & Viral Hepatitis Carolyn Wester, M.D, said the increase highlights the importance of ensuring that women of childbearing age have access to hepatitis C testing and treatment. Patrick agreed, noting that women who know they have the virus before pregnancy can be treated to hopefully clear the virus prior to becoming pregnant. He also said that it is increasingly important that infants exposed to hepatitis C are monitored to see if they get the virus. "We need to build systems of care to ensure that all infants exposed to the virus are adequately followed," Patrick said. TDH State Epidemiologist Tim Jones, M.D., said the study is an important reminder of the threat of this growing epidemic to high-risk populations throughout the U.S. "While this study focuses on pregnant women and a high-risk area in Tennessee, it is also important to remember that hundreds of thousands of people throughout the U.S. have hepatitis C, and a large percentage of them do not know it," Jones said. "Anyone born between 1945-1965, or who has ever used IV drugs, or is otherwise worried about hepatitis infection, is encouraged to discuss with their clinicians whether testing may be appropriate for them," he said.


Babesia is caused by microscopic parasites and is transmitted primarily through tick bites. However, as the disease is spread during ticks' young nymph stage, many patients are unaware of a tick encounter. There may be no symptoms, or those affected may experience flu-like symptoms. The disease destroys red blood cells and can lead to hemolytic anemia (jaundice and hemoglobinuria). Individuals with compromised immune systems may experience more severe complications. Although widespread, the main concentrations of the disease are found in the Northeastern and Midwestern portions of the U.S., according to the Center for Disease Control (CDC). The latest data from the CDC show more than 1,700 people were affected by Babesia in 2014 with highest concentrations in Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Maine, New Hampshire, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. The Procleix Babesia assay is designed to be a qualitative in vitro nucleic acid screening test for the direct detection of the Babesia parasite in specimens from human blood donors on the fully automated Procleix Panther system platform. This test, developed by Grifols Diagnostic Solutions, Inc., is designed to enable participating blood banks and donor centers in the U.S. to test donations to further safety of their blood supplies. "The availability of the assay under the IND protocol and in collaboration with the FDA marks another important milestone for Grifols," said Grifols Diagnostic Division President, Carsten Schroeder. "As leaders in the NAT blood screening market, we remain committed to preserve the safety of blood donations from the presence of unwanted pathogens. The Procleix Babesia assay will add to our growing portfolio and has been expressly designed to address the needs of the blood banking community." Currently, the majority of blood donations in the U.S. are being tested with the Procleix Zika virus assay (on the Procleix Panther system), released in June 2016 under an IND study. About Procleix NAT Solutions Today, Procleix systems are used to screen more blood donations around the world than any other NAT blood screening products, and include tests for HIV, hepatitis (A, B, C and E) viruses, West Nile virus and more. The Procleix Panther system automates all aspects of NAT-based blood screening on a single, integrated platform. It eliminates the need for batch processing and combines walk-away freedom with intuitive design for ease of use. The system has received regulatory approvals in countries around the world, and is in development for the U.S. market. About Grifols Grifols is a global healthcare company with more than a 75-year legacy of improving people's health and well-being through the development of protein therapies, hospital pharmacy products and diagnostic technology for clinical use. The company is present in more than 100 countries worldwide, with headquarters located in Barcelona, Spain. Grifols is a leader in plasma collection with a network of more than 170 plasma donation centers in the U.S., and is a leading producer of plasma-derived medicines. As a recognized leader in transfusion medicine, Grifols offers a comprehensive range of transfusion medicine, hemostasis, and immunoassay solutions for clinical laboratories, blood banks, and transfusion centers. In 2016, sales exceeded 4,000 million euros with approximately 15,000 employees. Grifols demonstrates its commitment to advancing healthcare by allocating a significant portion of its annual income to R&D. The company's class A shares are listed on the Spanish Stock Exchange, where they are part of the Ibex-35 (MCE: GRF). Its non-voting class B shares are listed on the Mercado Continuo (MCE: GRF.P) and on the U.S. NASDAQ via ADRs (NASDAQ: GRFS). For more information visit www.grifols.com. Procleix is a registered trademark of Grifols Worldwide Operations Limited. Panther is a registered trademark of Hologic, Inc. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/investigational-new-drug-application-is-now-effective-for-babesia-screening-in-blood-donations-using-grifols-procleix-panther-system-in-the-us-300454212.html


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

As of this year, kids under the age of 15 only need 2 doses of HPV vaccine. New research out of Boston Medical Center, published online in the STD Journal, is the first published clinical evidence to support new recommendations by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for a two-dose HPV vaccine to prevent genital warts. BMC researchers found that the two-dose human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine provides the same level of protection against genital warts as three doses, when given as directed. The study looked at nearly 400,000 girls from around the country to find the rate of genital warts based on the number of vaccine doses received. Researchers found that receiving two or three doses of the vaccine was effective. Both provided significantly more protection against genital warts than one dose or not receiving the vaccine at all. The vaccine is recommended to prevent HPV infections and its associated diseases, including cancers and genital warts. Recently, the CDC and the World Health Organization (WHO) updated their recommendations from a three to two dose vaccine schedule for girls and boys ages 9 to 14. "The CDC and WHO based the new two dose schedule primarily on immunogenicity results, but there was very little research on how effective that recommendation has been," said Rebecca Perkins, MD, obstetrician at BMC and the study's lead author. "This study validates the new recommendations and allows us to confidently move forward with the 2 dose schedule for the prevention of genital warts." Researchers did note that the rate of genital warts for all girls dropped significantly from 2007 to 2013 and attribute the trend to the wide distribution of the HPV vaccine in recent years. "The data supporting a two dose schedule is encouraging, but it only reports on genital warts, not cervical dysplasia or cancer outcomes. Collecting that long term data is paramount," said Perkins, who is also an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Boston University School of Medicine. "This study will be a stepping stone for future research into the effectiveness of the two dose schedule of the HPV vaccine for other symptoms of the disease."


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

California-based Myoscience, Inc. announced that the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared its ioveraº device for the relief of pain and symptoms associated with osteoarthritis of the knee for up to 90 days. The ioveraº technology is a non-opioid and non-systemic treatment for blocking pain signals from peripheral nerves. Osteoarthritis compromises the quality of life of more than 27 million Americans, with approximately 25% of knee osteoarthritis sufferers complaining of pain while performing daily activities (walking, climbing stairs, kneeling, etc.)(1). The effect of this disease on the United States economy is estimated to be $60 billion per year(2). Also, Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that the US is in the throes of an opioid epidemic, and that the total number of opioid-related deaths may be underestimated. “The iovera° technology has the potential to change the current paradigm of pain management for osteoarthritis”, said Dr. Vinod Dasa. “The patients that I have treated with this technology have experienced immediate and long-lasting pain relief; and are grateful to have an option that is non-narcotic and non-systemic.” The FDA clearance was based on a recent prospective, multi-center, sham-controlled, randomized, double-blind study of 180 subjects. The study concluded that patients treated with the iovera° device reported statistically significant greater reduction in pain and improvement in symptoms (p=0.001) when compared to patients who received the sham treatment(3). Also, patients who received the iovera° treatment reported pain relief lasting up to 90 days, accompanied by reduced stiffness and improved physical function. The full study results are published in the Osteoarthritis and Cartilage journal. Cary Vance, President and CEO of Myoscience, stated that “The addition of osteoarthritis to the indications for the iovera° treatment will help in extending our innovative non-opioid therapy to more patients, especially in the growing baby-boomer population. I anticipate this technology to become the non-narcotic and non-systemic solution of choice to manage knee pain.” The iovera° treatment uses the body’s natural response to cold to treat peripheral nerves. A sensory nerve will stop sending pain signals immediately after receiving targeted cold therapy via the iovera° treatment. The effect on the nerve is transient, providing pain relief until the nerve regenerates and its sensory function is fully restored. This pain relief is achieved without the use of habit-forming drugs such as opioids. For additional information, please visit http://www.iovera.com or email us directly at contact(at)myoscience.com. *Dr. Vinod Dasa, MD, is a member of Myoscience’s Medical Advisory Board 1 Source: A National Public Health Agenda for Osteoarthritis. CDC. February 4, 2010. 2 Buckwalter, JA, et al. The Impact of Osteoarthritis. Clin Orthop Related Res. Oct 2004. 427(427 Suppl):S6-S15. 3 Radnovich R, et al., Cryoneurolysis to Treat the Pain and Symptoms of Knee Osteoarthritis: A Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Blind, Sham-Controlled Trial, Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2017.03.006 ABOUT MYOSCIENCE Silicon Valley, California-based Myoscience is a privately-held medical device company committed to making its platform technology, the iovera° system, the standard of care for the treatment of peripheral nerves. The iovera° treatment is powered by the Focused Cold Therapy® delivery system, a patented miniaturization of traditional cryotherapy. The ioveraº system is 510k cleared in the U.S. for the blocking of pain, the relief of pain and symptoms associated with osteoarthritis of the knee for up to 90 days and general surgical use. For more information, please visit http://www.iovera.com. ABOUT OSTEOARTHRITIS According to reports from the CDC, approximately 27 million Americans suffer with osteoarthritis. While 1 in 2 people develop osteoarthritis during their lifetime, obesity increases the risk of knee osteoarthritis to 3 in 5. Quality of life is routinely affected, with 25% of knee osteoarthritis sufferers reporting trouble performing simple daily activities, such as walking, climbing, kneeling or stooping. (Source: A National Public Health Agenda for Osteoarthritis. CDC. February 4, 2010) ABOUT THE KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS STUDY The knee osteoarthritis study is a prospective, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the iovera° device for the temporary relief of pain associated with knee osteoarthritis. Study population included male or female, ages 35-75 with chronic knee pain related to knee osteoarthritis. © 2017 Myoscience. All rights reserved. iovera° and Focused Cold Therapy are trademarks of Myoscience. MKT-0442 REV A


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

BOSTON- As of this year, kids under the age of 15 only need 2 doses of HPV vaccine. New research out of Boston Medical Center, published online in the STD Journal, is the first published clinical evidence to support new recommendations by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for a two-dose HPV vaccine to prevent genital warts. BMC researchers found that the two-dose human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine provides the same level of protection against genital warts as three doses, when given as directed. The study looked at nearly 400,000 girls from around the country to find the rate of genital warts based on the number of vaccine doses received. Researchers found that receiving two or three doses of the vaccine was effective. Both provided significantly more protection against genital warts than one dose or not receiving the vaccine at all. The vaccine is recommended to prevent HPV infections and its associated diseases, including cancers and genital warts. Recently, the CDC and the World Health Organization (WHO) updated their recommendations from a three to two dose vaccine schedule for girls and boys ages 9 to 14. "The CDC and WHO based the new two dose schedule primarily on immunogenicity results, but there was very little research on how effective that recommendation has been," said Rebecca Perkins, MD, obstetrician at BMC and the study's lead author. "This study validates the new recommendations and allows us to confidently move forward with the 2 dose schedule for the prevention of genital warts." Researchers did note that the rate of genital warts for all girls dropped significantly from 2007 to 2013 and attribute the trend to the wide distribution of the HPV vaccine in recent years. "The data supporting a two dose schedule is encouraging, but it only reports on genital warts, not cervical dysplasia or cancer outcomes. Collecting that long term data is paramount," said Perkins, who is also an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Boston University School of Medicine. "This study will be a stepping stone for future research into the effectiveness of the two dose schedule of the HPV vaccine for other symptoms of the disease." The study was funded by the American Cancer Society Mentored Research Scholar Grant (MRSG-09-151-01). Boston Medical Center is a private, not-for-profit, 493-bed, academic medical center that is the primary teaching affiliate of Boston University School of Medicine. It is the largest and busiest provider of trauma and emergency services in New England. Committed to providing high-quality health care to all, the hospital offers a full spectrum of pediatric and adult care services including primary and family medicine and advanced specialty care with an emphasis on community-based care. Boston Medical Center offers specialized care for complex health problems and is a leading research institution, receiving more than $119 million in sponsored research funding in fiscal year 2015. It is the 11th largest recipient of funding in the U.S. from the National Institutes of Health among independent hospitals. In 1997, BMC founded Boston Medical Center Health Plan, Inc., now one of the top ranked Medicaid MCOs in the country, as a non-profit managed care organization. It does business in Massachusetts as BMC HealthNet Plan and as Well Sense Health Plan in New Hampshire, serving more than 315,000 people, collectively. Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine are partners in the Boston HealthNet - 14 community health centers focused on providing exceptional health care to residents of Boston. For more information, please visit.


News Article | April 22, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

This question originally appeared on Quora. Answer by Thomas Snerdley. The Two Bag System. Every pro traveler I've ever met travels light using some variation of this system. Travel bag  [1]: High quality 25 to 40 liter travel pack with (preferably fold-away) hip belt. Clothes, electronics, toiletries, gifts.  Liquids/gels in a quart Ziploc by itself for easy inspection removal. My clothes are rolled up into an Eagle Creek 2-sided travel cube [1a] with a plastic divider in the middle to separate the clean from the unwashed (isolating the smell away from the clean clothes and the rest of the bag) without having to pack two separate clothes bags ... genius!  Always leave the travel bag at least 1/3 empty for souvenirs, and to leave room to carry: Purse/man-bag  or  hiking waist-pack  [2]. Everything you will need to survive up to 18 hours in your airplane, train, boat, bus or tuktuk seat. (e.g., iPad, smartphone, snacks, eyeshade, earplugs, wet wipes, water bottle, etc.) You never have to touch your main travel bag after putting it in the overhead bin (on the opposite side of the aisle, so you can keep eyes on it without having to crane your neck). Going through Security: Put the small bag inside the big bag. Put everything except your picture ID and boarding pass into one of the big bag's zippered pockets and secure it with a heavy duty twist-tie (I use Nite Ize gear ties [3]). Since your Ziploc bag with liquids/gels is in its own pocket (right?) you won't accidentally lose anything taking it out for inspection. After clearing security, it'll take 30 seconds to put the Ziploc bag back in, your shoes back on and be on your way. Walk until you find a nice quiet area of the airport away from potential pickpockets to put everything back in your pants pockets.  Walk by the folks paying $4.50 for a small bottle of water and, without being smug, fill your empty water bottle from a drinking fountain. (Not sure if the water in that country is safe to drink? Use the Center for Disease Control's guidelines for healthy travel water: How do I know what to bring? As you pack your bags, make a text list on your smartphone of everything you pack. On your trip, once in a while when you're bored waiting for a bus or plane go through the list and put a + next to everything you actually used. Next time you travel, don't pack anything without a + next to it.  Even after all these years my travel pack gets a little lighter every time I travel. That's important because if it's too early to check in to a hotel, I can actually walk around town all day with my light pack (with at least 75% of the weight resting on the hip belt, not the shoulder straps!) unlike "overpackers". [4] How do I wash my clothes, for free? In the shower with hotel soap and/or shampoo, while you're still wearing them. That's why world travelers swear by quick-dry Marmot, Icebreaker and Ex-Officio clothing. Start with t-shirt, socks, shorts, undies, then yourself.  After your shower, first wring them out as dry as you can without overly stressing the fabric. Then, lay a hotel towel out on the bed, put one article of clothing on it at a time, roll it up as tightly as possible, then sit on it for a few seconds. [5]  This gets them much drier than hand-wringing alone. Your clothes will now easily air dry overnight draped over the furniture even if there's no fan or A/C. How do I figure out where to stay and what to do, for free? Before you travel:  WIKIVOYAGE or Quora. While you travel: ask people. My personal system is to upload Wikivoyage pages to my Evernote account, which I have set to automatically download to my iPhone so I can use them even with no Internet connection. No muss, no fuss ... How do I make friends in a strange city or country if I don't know anyone and I'm an introvert (that's me!)? Sign up for a several-hour activity of some kind through your hotel, hostel or whoever's offering one. Elephant riding, bamboo raft ride, parasailing, ziplining, hot springs soak, cooking class ... doesn't matter, whatever floats your boat.  You'll inevitably meet people with whom you have something in common, strike up a conversation, and gather serious intel on this location (since they've probably been there a day or two) and lots of other places they just visited that they can't wait to tell you about and show you pictures of themselves standing in front of.    Always remember, the only hard part about travel is buying that first airplane ticket! Everything after that is easy.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

LOUISVILLE, Ky.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--In the category of “seeing is believing,” CuVerro® released a video today that pits antimicrobial copper against stainless steel in a side-by-side MRSA-fighting duel. MRSA is an antibiotic-resistant strain of bacteria that the Center for Disease Control believes infects 80,000 hospital patients each year and kills more than 11,000. The video, aptly titled “Super Bugs,” is a composite of tests staged in a laboratory at the University of Southampton in England where an antimicrobial copper surface demonstrates its dominance over the super bug MRSA, virtually wiping out 10 million units of the harmful bacteria in minutes. Meanwhile, on stainless, the bug lives on to infect another day. CuVerro® antimicrobial copper alloys are natural enemies of super bugs and bacteria in general. Research conducted in government and university labs here and abroad show that copper kills 99.9 percent of harmful bacteria like MRSA within two hours of contact. CuVerro is the first copper brand to be registered as a germ-fighter by the EPA. As a result, CuVerro is gaining favor among infection control professionals eager to reduce surface bacteria in the health and fitness industries. Over 300 facilities in the U.S. are using copper sinks, incubators, bed rails, light switch covers, IV poles, dumbbells, etc. to help fight the spread of deadly germs. CuVerro (www.cuverro.com) is manufactured by GBC Metals, LLC, doing business as Olin Brass, a wholly owned subsidiary of Global Brass and Copper, Inc. which is a subsidiary of Global Brass and Copper Holdings, Inc. (NYSE:BRSS), the leading manufacturer and distributor of copper, copper‐alloy and bactericidal copper sheet, strip, plate, foil, rod, ingot and fabricated components in North America and one of the largest in the world. GBC Metals engages in the melting, casting, rolling, drawing, extruding and stamping of specialized copper and copper alloys finished products from scrap, cathode and other refined metals. (OB‐0034‐1510)

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