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News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

FAIRPORT, NY, November 03, 2016-- William Y. Chey, MD, DSc, has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.With more than 50 years of experience as a physician, educator and research scientist in gastrointestinal medicine, Dr. Chey is widely recognized for his expertise in the field of gastroenterology and hepatology. Prior to his retirement in 2000, he served as a professor of medicine and director of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the University of Rochester Medical Center, and as a consultant gastroenterologist at Canandaigua VA Medical Center. He is a fellow of the American College of Gastroenterology and the American Gastroenterological Association, a member of the AGA Legacy Society, and was a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and American Physiological Society, among other medical organizations. In addition, he is the former president of the American Pancreatic Association and the American Society of Acupuncture. He was invited nationally and internationally as a visiting professor by numerous prestigious institutions in the United States, Europe, Asia and Mid-Eastern countries. In particular, he holds the titles of Honorary Professor at the Catholic University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea and Visiting Professor at Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China and Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.After completing his medical education in 1953 through the two top medical schools in Seoul, Korea, Seoul National University and Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea, and serving as a medical officer of the Republic of Korea in the Korean War, Dr. Chey emigrated to the United States in 1954 and had his post-graduate training including internship and residency in internal medicine at City Hospital of New York, fellowship in pathology at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, and fellowship in hepatology at Jersey City Medical Center, Seton Hall University School of Medicine and Dentistry, Jersey City, NJ. Then he received advanced degrees of Master of Science in Gastroenterology in 1962 and Doctor of Science in Medicine in 1966 from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. At Temple University Medical Center and the Samuel S. Fel's Research Institute, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, he finished a fellowship in gastroenterology and became a faculty member in 1963. He was an Associate Professor of Medicine and Head of Gastrointestinal Research in 1971 when he was recruited by the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY. He was the Founding Director of the Isaac Gordon Center for Digestive Diseases and Nutrition at the Genesee Hospital and Attending Physician at Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, NY. In 1992, he became Director of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the University of Rochester Medical Center. He was also the Founding Director of the William and Sheila Konar Center for Digestive and Liver Diseases at Strong Memorial Hospital until his retirement in 2000. During his tenure, he trained numerous clinical and research fellows from the United States and abroad, including Asia, Europe, South America, Mid-East and Africa. The majority of them returned to their native countries and are active in their leadership positions. During the following ten years, he enjoyed practicing gastrointestinal medicine at the Rochester Institute for Digestive Diseases and Sciences and was also actively involved in the American Gastroenterological Association and the American Pancreatic Association. He has been married to Fan K. Tang since 1959. They have 4 children; William D. married to Janine Zwiren, Donna married to Dale Hoellrich, Richard married to Maura Bauman, and Laura married to Richard Warren, and 9 grandchildren; Cameron, Brandon (deceased), Samuel, Megen, Russell, Paris, Wyatt, Josephine and LiLi.He contributed numerous articles to competitive scientific journals, and published many chapters in text-books and two books of his specialty and research. He was a member of the editorial board of the Pancreas and American Journal of Physiology, and has been the Editor-In-Chief of Clinical Endoscopy since 2011. He served as an active member of the National Institute of Health, Surgery and Bioengineering Study Section and a consultant to the Gastrointestinal Drug Advisory Committee, Food and Drug Administration, Department of Health and Human Services.In recognition of his contributions to medicine, Dr. Chey received a wide variety of honors and awards. He was the recipient of the V.L. William and Frisca Go Award for Life Time Achievement from the American Pancreatic Association, the Governor's Award for Excellence in Clinical Research from the American College of Gastroenterology, Distinguished Clinician Award and Mentor's Research Scholar Award from the American Gastroenterological Association, Distinguished Service Award from the Rochester Academy of Medicine and American Top Physicians Award in 2008 from the Consumers' Research Council of America. He has been cited in Marquis Who's Who in America, in Medicine and Health Care, in Science and Engineering, and in the World.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


Lichtenstein G.R.,University of Pennsylvania | Zakko S.,Connecticut Gastroenterology Institute | Gordon G.L.,Center for Digestive and Liver Diseases | Murthy U.,Syracuse Medical Center | And 5 more authors.
Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics | Year: 2012

Background Mesalazine (mesalamine) granules (MG) were shown to be effective for the maintenance of remission of ulcerative colitis (UC) in two double-blind placebo-controlled trials. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of once-daily MG for maintenance of remission in patients with UC who switched from other 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) formulations. Methods Data from two independent multicenter, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 6-month trials evaluating patients with UC in remission were combined for analysis of a subpopulation of patients who switched from other 5-ASA formulations to MG 1.5 g or placebo upon randomisation. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients who remained relapse-free at Month 6 or end of treatment. Relapse was defined as a Sutherland Disease Activity Index (SDAI) rectal bleeding score ≥1 and mucosal appearance score ≥2, a UC flare or medication used to treat a UC flare. Results Of the 487 patients who received 5-ASA maintenance therapy at enrolment, 322 were in the MG group and 165 were in the placebo group. The percentage of patients who remained relapse-free (based on Sutherland Disease Activity Index scores) after 6 months was significantly higher with MG than placebo (78.3% vs. 58.8%, P < 0.001). Rectal bleeding, stool frequency and the physician's rating of disease activity remained unchanged after 6 months in a higher percentage of patients using MG compared with those on placebo (P < 0.004 for each endpoint). Conclusion Mesalazine granules 1.5 g once-daily is effective for maintenance of remission in UC patients who switch from other 5-ASA formulations. identifiers NCT00744016, NCT00767728. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Lichtenstein G.R.,University of Pennsylvania | Gordon G.L.,Center for Digestive and Liver Diseases | Zakko S.,Connecticut Gastroenterology Institute | Murthy U.,Syracuse Medical Center | And 6 more authors.
Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics | Year: 2010

Background Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic relapsing and remitting idiopathic inflammatory bowel disorder. Aim To evaluate once-daily mesalamine (mesalazine) granules (MG) for maintenance of remission of UC. Methods Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of patients (n = 209 MG, n = 96 placebo) with UC in remission [revised Sutherland Disease Activity Index (SDAI) rectal bleeding = 0, mucosal appearance <2] who took MG 1.5 g or placebo once-daily for up to 6 months. Primary efficacy endpoint: the percentage of patients who remained relapse-free at month 6/end of treatment. Relapse was defined as SDAI rectal bleeding score ≥1 and a mucosal appearance score ≥2, a UC flare, or initiation of medication to treat a UC flare. Results The percentage of relapse-free patients at month 6/end of treatment was higher with MG than placebo (78.9% vs. 58.3%, P < 0.001) in the intent-to-treat analysis. Significant differences (P ≤ 0.025) favouring MG were observed for most secondary endpoints including improvement in rectal bleeding, physician's disease activity rating, stool frequency, the SDAI at month 6/end of treatment, patients classified as a treatment success and relapse-free duration. The incidence of adverse events was similar between groups. Conclusions Once-daily mesalamine (mesalazine) was effective in maintaining remission of UC for 6 months. © 2010 Salix Pharmaceuticals.


Lichtenstein G.R.,University of Pennsylvania | Gordon G.L.,Center for Digestive and Liver Diseases | Zakko S.,Connecticut Gastroenterology Institute and Clinical Research Foundation | Murthy U.,Syracuse Medical Center | And 6 more authors.
Digestive Diseases and Sciences | Year: 2016

Background: Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) who achieve remission with corticosteroids often relapse after tapering or discontinuation; alternative treatments limiting steroid exposure and UC relapse would be beneficial. It remains uncertain whether patients with corticosteroid-induced remission experience benefit with mesalamine granules (MG), a locally acting aminosalicylate extended-release capsule formulation for maintenance of UC remission in adults. Aims: Efficacy and safety of MG 1.5 g once daily was evaluated in patients with UC in corticosteroid-induced remission. Methods: Data from patients with previous corticosteroid use to achieve baseline UC remission were analyzed from two 6-month randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials and a 24-month open-label extension (OLE). Six-month relapse-free rates were assessed using the revised Sutherland Disease Activity Index. UC-related adverse events (AEs) were recorded during the 30 months. Results: Included were 158 steroid-treated patients in UC remission (MG, n = 105; placebo, n = 53) and 74/105 MG-treated patients who continued MG in the OLE. A significantly larger percentage of patients remained relapse-free at 6 months with MG (77.1 %) versus placebo (54.7 %; P = 0.006), with a 55 % reduction in relapse risk (hazard ratio [HR] 0.45; 95 % CI 0.25–0.79). There was a similar (49.2 %) reduction in risk of UC-related AEs at 6 months (HR 0.51; 95 % CI 0.31–0.84; P = 0.009) that was sustained during the OLE. Conclusions: MG 1.5 g once daily administered for maintenance of corticosteroid-induced remission was associated with low risk of relapse and UC-related AEs. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00744016, NCT00767728, and NCT00326209. © 2015, The Author(s).


PubMed | The Maria Nathanson Center at Saint Thomas Hospital, Center for Digestive and Liver Diseases, Gastroenterology Associates of Central Georgia LLC, Connecticut Gastroenterology Institute and Clinical Research Foundation and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Digestive diseases and sciences | Year: 2016

Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) who achieve remission with corticosteroids often relapse after tapering or discontinuation; alternative treatments limiting steroid exposure and UC relapse would be beneficial. It remains uncertain whether patients with corticosteroid-induced remission experience benefit with mesalamine granules (MG), a locally acting aminosalicylate extended-release capsule formulation for maintenance of UC remission in adults.Efficacy and safety of MG 1.5 g once daily was evaluated in patients with UC in corticosteroid-induced remission.Data from patients with previous corticosteroid use to achieve baseline UC remission were analyzed from two 6-month randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials and a 24-month open-label extension (OLE). Six-month relapse-free rates were assessed using the revised Sutherland Disease Activity Index. UC-related adverse events (AEs) were recorded during the 30 months.Included were 158 steroid-treated patients in UC remission (MG, n = 105; placebo, n = 53) and 74/105 MG-treated patients who continued MG in the OLE. A significantly larger percentage of patients remained relapse-free at 6 months with MG (77.1 %) versus placebo (54.7 %; P = 0.006), with a 55 % reduction in relapse risk (hazard ratio [HR] 0.45; 95 % CI 0.25-0.79). There was a similar (49.2 %) reduction in risk of UC-related AEs at 6 months (HR 0.51; 95 % CI 0.31-0.84; P = 0.009) that was sustained during the OLE.MG 1.5 g once daily administered for maintenance of corticosteroid-induced remission was associated with low risk of relapse and UC-related AEs. CLINICALTRIALS.GOV: NCT00744016, NCT00767728, and NCT00326209.

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