Center for the Development of Best Practices in Health

Yaoundé, Cameroon

Center for the Development of Best Practices in Health

Yaoundé, Cameroon

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Chiabi A.,Yaounde Gynaeco Obstetric and Pediatric Hospital | Djoupomb M.,Institute Superieur Des Science Of La Sante | Mah E.,Yaounde Gynaeco Obstetric and Pediatric Hospital | Nguefack S.,Yaounde Gynaeco Obstetric and Pediatric Hospital | And 5 more authors.
Iranian Journal of Pediatrics | Year: 2011

Objective: Sepsis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates especially in developing countries where identification of the germs and treatment is often unsatisfactory. The aim of the study was to assess the clinical presentation, and bacteriological profile of neonatal infections, and the sensitivity of the causative germs to antibiotics. Methods: We carried out a prospective analytic study in the Yaounde Gynaeco-Obstetric and Pediatric Hospital in Cameroon over a 6 months period from 18th November 2008 to 18 th May 2009. On the basis of history and/or clinical findings and paraclinical investigations, 218 neonates out of a total of 628 admissions were investigated and managed for neonatal infection. Findings: The most frequent symptoms were fever (44.95%), refusal to feed/irritability (32.11%), and respiratory distress/cough (28.90%). Premature birth and prolonged rupture of membranes were the most frequent risk factors. Klebsiella spp, Escherichia coli and Enterobacter spp were the most frequent germs identified in respectively 28.6%, 21.4% and 14.3% of the positive samples. Overall sensitivity of the cultures to ampicillin, netilmicin and gentamycin was poor at 29.4%, 31.4% and 18.9% respectively, whereas imipenem, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime had the best sensitivities in 91.7%, 90%, 85.3% and 69.4% of the cultures respectively. The mortality rate was 22%, and low birth weight, premature birth and septicemia were significant risk factors for death. Conclusion: Mortality from neonatal sepsis in this context is still high and there is an upsurge of multi-resistant germs to currently used antibiotics, calling for the need for rational use of antibiotics in the management of these infections. © 2011 by Pediatrics Center of Excellence, Children's Medical Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, All rights reserved.


Mbuagbaw L.C.E.,Center for the Development of Best Practices in Health | Gofin R.,University of Nebraska Medical Center
Maternal and Child Health Journal | Year: 2011

A combined measure of optimal antenatal care can provide more information on the role it plays in maternal health. Our objectives were to investigate the determinants of a measure of optimal antenatal care and the associated pregnancy outcomes. Data on 7,557 women taken from the 2004 Demographic and Health Survey in Cameroon were used to develop a new measurement of optimal antenatal care based on four indicators: at least four visits, first visit in first trimester, last visit in third trimester and a professional provider of antenatal care. We studied the relationship of this new variable with other related variables in a multivariate analysis, taking into account the complex study design. Almost sixty six percent of the women had optimal antenatal care. Secondary or higher education (OR 1.74; 95% CI 1.28-2.36), greater wealth (OR 2.31; 95% CI 1.73-3.1), urban residence (OR 1.42; 95% CI 1.12-1.82) and parity of 3-4 (OR 0.79; 95% CI 0.62-0.99) were independently associated with optimal antenatal care. Women with optimal antenatal care were more likely to deliver in a health unit (OR 2.91; 95% CI 2.42-3.49), to be assisted by a skilled health worker during delivery (OR 1.88; 95% CI 1.49-2.37) and to have a baby with a normal birthweight (OR 1.62; 95% CI 1.11-2.38). Obtaining and using a new measure for ANC is feasible. The association of optimal antenatal care to education, wealth and residence in this study, consistent with others, highlights the role of the country's development in maternal health. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


PubMed | Center for the Development of Best Practices in Health
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Maternal and child health journal | Year: 2011

A combined measure of optimal antenatal care can provide more information on the role it plays in maternal health. Our objectives were to investigate the determinants of a measure of optimal antenatal care and the associated pregnancy outcomes. Data on 7,557 women taken from the 2004 Demographic and Health Survey in Cameroon were used to develop a new measurement of optimal antenatal care based on four indicators: at least four visits, first visit in first trimester, last visit in third trimester and a professional provider of antenatal care. We studied the relationship of this new variable with other related variables in a multivariate analysis, taking into account the complex study design. Almost sixty six percent of the women had optimal antenatal care. Secondary or higher education (OR 1.74; 95% CI 1.28-2.36), greater wealth (OR 2.31; 95% CI 1.73-3.1), urban residence (OR 1.42; 95% CI 1.12-1.82) and parity of 3-4 (OR 0.79; 95% CI 0.62-0.99) were independently associated with optimal antenatal care. Women with optimal antenatal care were more likely to deliver in a health unit (OR 2.91; 95% CI 2.42-3.49), to be assisted by a skilled health worker during delivery (OR 1.88; 95% CI 1.49-2.37) and to have a baby with a normal birthweight (OR 1.62; 95% CI 1.11-2.38). Obtaining and using a new measure for ANC is feasible. The association of optimal antenatal care to education, wealth and residence in this study, consistent with others, highlights the role of the countrys development in maternal health.

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