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Sharma Y.,Jamia Hamdard University | Ahmad A.,Aligarh Muslim University | Bashir S.,Jamia Hamdard University | Elahi A.,Center for Cellular and Molecular Biology Council for Scientific and Industrial Research | Khan F.,Jamia Hamdard University
Future Oncology | Year: 2016

The altered expression of SHP-1 (SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase) as a consequence of promoter hypermethylation or mutations has evidently been linked to cancer development. The notion of being a cancer drug target is conceivable as SHP-1 negatively regulates cell cycle and inflammatory pathways which are an inevitable part of oncogenic transformation. In the present review, we try to critically analyze the role of SHP-1 in cancer progression via regulating the above mentioned pathways with the major emphasis on cell cycle components and JAK/STAT pathway, commencing with the SHP-1 biology in immune cell signaling. Lastly, we have provided the future directions for researchers to encourage SHP-1 as a prognostic marker and curative target for this debilitating disease called as cancer. © 2016 Future Medicine Ltd. Source


Kamal M.Z.,Center for Cellular and Molecular Biology Council for Scientific and Industrial Research | Mohammad T.A.S.,DNA Diagnostics Center | Mohammad T.A.S.,University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio | Krishnamoorthy G.,Tata Institute of Fundamental Research | Rao N.M.,Center for Cellular and Molecular Biology Council for Scientific and Industrial Research
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

Relationship between stability and activity of enzymes is maintained by underlying conformational flexibility. In thermophilic enzymes, a decrease in flexibility causes low enzyme activity while in less stable proteins such as mesophiles and psychrophiles, an increase in flexibility is associated with enhanced enzyme activity. Recently, we identified a mutant of a lipase whose stability and activity were enhanced simultaneously. In this work, we probed the conformational dynamics of the mutant and the wild type lipase, particularly flexibility of their active site using molecular dynamic simulations and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. In contrast to the earlier observations, our data show that active site of the mutant is more rigid than wild type enzyme. Further investigation suggests that this lipase needs minimal reorganization/flexibility of active site residues during its catalytic cycle. Molecular dynamic simulations suggest that catalytically competent active site geometry of the mutant is relatively more preserved than wild type lipase, which might have led to its higher enzyme activity. Our study implies that widely accepted positive correlation between conformation flexibility and enzyme activity need not be stringent and draws attention to the possibility that high enzyme activity can still be accomplished in a rigid active site and stable protein structures. This finding has a significant implication towards better understanding of involvement of dynamic motions in enzyme catalysis and enzyme engineering through mutations in active site. © 2012 Kamal et al. Source


Ab S.,Center for Cellular and Molecular Biology Council for Scientific and Industrial Research | Srivastava P.,Center for Cellular and Molecular Biology Council for Scientific and Industrial Research | Shivaji S.,Center for Cellular and Molecular Biology Council for Scientific and Industrial Research
Proteomics - Clinical Applications | Year: 2014

Endometriosis is a complex gynecological disease, characterized by the presence and growth of endometrial tissue outside the uterus, resulting in pelvic pain and infertility. It occurs in 10% of women in their reproductive age. The viable endometrial cells enter the peritoneal cavity by retrograde menstruation, implant, and cause lesions ectopically; depending on their ability to survive, attach, grow, and invade. These "normal" endometrial cells turn "endometriotic" apparently because of inherent abnormalities present in them. Information on these molecular abnormalities is now being sought through proteomic approaches. Recent proteome-based comparisons between the eutopic endometrium from normal women and patients with endometriosis have revealed several proteins (many of which are shown to have a role in several cancers), of which a few have been validated as potential players in the etiology of endometriosis. After an initial in-flow of information from these proteome studies of eutopic endometrium, focus now needs to be expanded to the changes in the various protein PTMs and their upstream effectors present in these tissues. Early diagnosis of endometriosis through noninvasive means is the need of the hour as well-which would require the use of the presently existing immunoassays, along with the advancing MS-based proteomics. In this review, we aim to discuss these future thrust areas of human endometriosis proteomics and also present the proteomic advances made so far in understanding the molecular basis of endometriosis. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Source

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