Center for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Research

Sun City Center, United States

Center for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Research

Sun City Center, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Luce W.A.,Ohio State University | Luce W.A.,Heart Center | Luce W.A.,Center for Perinatal Research | Luce W.A.,Nationwide Childrens Hospital | And 14 more authors.
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine | Year: 2011

Objective: To investigate the prevalence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in neonates undergoing the Stage I hybrid procedure for palliation of complex congenital heart disease (CHD). Neonates undergoing the Norwood surgery for hypoplastic left-heart syndrome have the highest risk for NEC of all CHD patients. The hybrid procedure is another palliative option for hypoplastic left-heart syndrome, but NEC in neonates undergoing this procedure has not been reported. Design: Retrospective chart review of 73 neonates who underwent the hybrid procedure for palliation of complex CHD. Demographic, perinatal, perioperative, clinical, and procedural data were collected. NEC was defined as modified Bell's Stage II and above. Setting: The cardiothoracic and neonatal intensive care units in a large free-standing children's hospital. Patients: All neonates who underwent the hybrid Stage I procedure for the palliation of complex CHD from April 2002 through April 2008. Measurements and Main Results: Seventy-three neonates were reviewed and 11.0% (eight of 73) developed NEC. Of the patients with NEC, 37.5% (three of eight) died and two patients required abdominal surgery. Earlier gestational age (<37 wks), lower maximum dose of prostaglandin infusion, and unexpected readmission to the intensive care unit were statistically associated with NEC (p = .009, 0.02, and 0.04, respectively). No other demographic, perinatal, perioperative, clinical, or procedural variables were associated with the development of NEC in this patient population, including enteral feeding regimens, umbilical artery catheters, inotrope use, and average oxygen saturation and diastolic blood pressure. Conclusions: The prevalence of NEC in patients undergoing the hybrid procedure is comparable to that reported for neonates undergoing the Norwood procedure. Earlier gestational age is a significant risk factor for NEC in patients who undergo the hybrid Stage I procedure. Multidisciplinary approaches to better understand abdominal complications and to develop feeding regimens in neonates undergoing the hybrid approach to complex CHD are needed to improve outcomes and decrease morbidities. Copyright © 2011 by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies.


Huk D.J.,Center for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Research | Huk D.J.,Nationwide Childrens Hospital | Hammond H.L.,Center for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Research | Hammond H.L.,Nationwide Childrens Hospital | And 4 more authors.
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology | Year: 2013

Objective-: Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a major public health problem with no effective treatment available other than surgery. We previously showed that mature heart valves calcify in response to retinoic acid (RA) treatment through downregulation of the SRY transcription factor Sox9. In this study, we investigated the effects of excess vitamin A and its metabolite RA on heart valve structure and function in vivo and examined the molecular mechanisms of RA signaling during the calcification process in vitro. METHODS AND RESULTS-: Using a combination of approaches, we defined calcific aortic valve disease pathogenesis in mice fed 200 IU/g and 20 IU/g of retinyl palmitate for 12 months at molecular, cellular, and functional levels. We show that mice fed excess vitamin A develop aortic valve stenosis and leaflet calcification associated with increased expression of osteogenic genes and decreased expression of cartilaginous markers. Using a pharmacological approach, we show that RA-mediated Sox9 repression and calcification is regulated by classical RA signaling and requires both RA and retinoid X receptors. CONCLUSION-: Our studies demonstrate that excess vitamin A dietary intake promotes heart valve calcification in vivo. Therefore suggesting that hypervitaminosis A could serve as a new risk factor of calcific aortic valve disease in the human population. © 2012 American Heart Association, Inc.

Loading Center for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Research collaborators
Loading Center for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Research collaborators