Piemonte Center for Cancer Prevention

Sant'Ambrogio di Torino, Italy

Piemonte Center for Cancer Prevention

Sant'Ambrogio di Torino, Italy
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Agnoli C.,Instituto Nazionale dei Tumori | Grioni S.,Instituto Nazionale dei Tumori | Sieri S.,Instituto Nazionale dei Tumori | Sacerdote C.,Human Genetics Foundation | And 12 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Background: Metabolic syndrome (defined as at least three among abdominal obesity, high blood triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high blood glucose, and high blood pressure) is emerging as a risk factor for breast cancer; however few studies - most confined to postmenopausal women - have investigated associations between breast cancer risk and metabolic syndrome. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between metabolic syndrome and its components, and risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal and premenopausal women. Methods: We performed a case-cohort study on 22,494 women recruited in 1993-1998 to four Italian centres (Turin, Varese, Naples, Ragusa) of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) and followed-up for up to 15 years. A random subcohort of 565 women was obtained and 593 breast cancer cases were diagnosed. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for potential confounders, were estimated by Prentice-weighted Cox proportional hazards models. Results: Presence of metabolic syndrome was associated with significantly increased breast cancer risk in all women (HR 1.52, 95%CI 1.14-2.02). When the analyses were repeated separately for menopausal status, the association was limited to postmenopausal women (HR 1.80, 95%CI 1.22-2.65) and absent in premenopausal women (HR 0.71, 95%CI 0.43-1.16); P for interaction between metabolic syndrome and menopausal status was 0.001. Of metabolic syndrome components, only high blood glucose was significantly associated with increased breast cancer risk in all women (HR 1.47, 95%CI 1.13-1.91) and postmenopausal women (HR 1.89, 95%CI 1.29-2.77), but not premenopausal women (HR 0.80, 95%CI 0.52-1.22; P interaction=0.004). Conclusions: These findings support previous data indicating that metabolic syndrome is an important risk factor for breast cancer in postmenopausal women, but not in premenopausal women, and suggest that prevention of metabolic syndrome through lifestyle changes could confer protection against breast cancer. © 2015 Agnoli et al.

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