a Center for Behavioural Research in Cancer

Melbourne, Australia

a Center for Behavioural Research in Cancer

Melbourne, Australia
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PubMed | a Center for Behavioural Research in Cancer and University of Melbourne
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of health communication | Year: 2016

Campaign-stimulated conversations have been shown to increase the effectiveness of antismoking campaigns. In order to explore why such effects occur, in the current study we coded the content of naturally occurring conversations. We also examined whether the short-term effects of talking, and of different types of talk, on quitting intentions were mediated through intrapersonal message responses. Using the Natural Exposure(SM) methodology, we exposed 411 smokers to 1 of 6 antismoking advertisements while they were watching television at home. Responses to the advertisement-conversation participation and content, emotional responses, personalized perceived effectiveness, and changes in intentions to quit-were measured within 3 days of exposure. Conversations were coded for appraisal of the advertisement (favorable, neutral, or unfavorable) and the presence of quitting talk and emotion talk. Mediation analyses indicated that the positive effects of talking on intention change were mediated through personalized perceived effectiveness and that the positive effects were driven by conversations that contained a favorable appraisal and/or quitting talk. Conversely, conversations that contained an unfavorable appraisal of the advertisement were negatively associated with campaign effectiveness. These findings highlight the importance of measuring interpersonal communication when evaluating campaigns and the need for further research to identify the message characteristics that predict when smokers talk and when they talk only in desirable ways.


PubMed | a Center for Behavioural Research in Cancer and University of Melbourne
Type: | Journal: Health communication | Year: 2016

Smokers often talk about antismoking campaigns, and these conversations can contribute to campaign effectiveness. However, little is known about the predictors and content of naturally occurring campaign-generated conversations. In two studies (Study 1,N=480; Study 2,N=232), we systematically examined whether the occurrence and content of smokers conversations after exposure to one of eight antismoking television advertisements were predicted by characteristics of (a) the message, (b) intrapersonal responses to the message, (c) the individual, and (d) the social context in which exposure occurred. In multivariable models, we found that conversations were more likely to occur when advertisement exposure occurred in the presence of others, and as the amount of anxiety elicited by the advertisement increased. Conversations were more likely to contain a favorable appraisal of the advertisement when the message elicited higher levels of sadness, and less likely to contain favorable appraisals when the respondent had finished secondary education (vs. lower levels of education). Stronger feelings of guilt reduced the likelihood that conversations contained unfavorable appraisals, and increased the likelihood that they contained quitting talk. These findings suggest several promising avenues for future investigations into why smokers talk and talk in particular ways.

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