Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Trademark
Center for Autism and Related Disorders LLC | Date: 2016-04-05

Printed instructional, educational, and teaching materials in the field of autism or related disorders; Packaged kits comprising printed instructional, educational, and teaching materials for educational activities in the field of autism or related disorders. Educational services, namely, conducting classes, seminars, conferences, workshops, and individual instruction in the field of autism or related disorders; Educational services, namely, conducting classes, seminars, conferences, workshops, and individual instructionin the field of autism or related disordersand distribution ofcourse and educational materialsin connection therewith.


Abc

Trademark
Center for Autism and Related Disorders LLC | Date: 2016-04-05

Printed instructional, educational, and teaching materials in the field of autism or related disorders; Packaged kits comprising printed instructional, educational, and teaching materials for educational activities in the field of autism or related disorders. Educational services, namely, conducting programs in the field of autism or related disorders; Educational services, namely, conducting classes, seminars, conferences, workshops, and individual instruction in the field of autism or related disorders and distribution of course material in connection therewith; Educational services, namely, conducting classes, seminars, conferences, workshops, and individual instruction in the field of autism or related disordersand distributionofeducational materials in connection therewith.


Kenzer A.L.,Center for Autism and Related Disorders Inc. | Bishop M.R.,Center for Autism and Related Disorders Inc.
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders | Year: 2011

This study examined relative preference for familiar and novel stimuli for 31 children with autism. Preference surveys, completed by 39 staff members, identified high and low preference familiar stimuli for each participant. Novel stimuli were selected by experimenters and included items that were not reported on a preference survey for that child. Subsequently, two paired-stimulus preference assessments were conducted comparing staff-reported high preference stimuli to (1) staff-reported low preference stimuli and (2) experimenter-selected novel stimuli. Results indicated that 27 of 31 participants (87%) frequently selected stimuli that were reportedly less preferred or novel. The inclusion of a wide array of familiar and novel stimuli may increase the number of preferred stimuli identified for use within behavioral interventions for children with autism. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Bishop M.R.,Center for Autism and Related Disorders Inc. | Kenzer A.L.,Center for Autism and Related Disorders Inc.
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders | Year: 2012

The purpose of this study was to examine group classroom instruction and the need for in vivo feedback when teaching 11 behavioral therapists how to conduct a brief paired-stimulus preference assessment, when to conduct preference assessments, and how to interpret the data during regular therapy sessions. Group classroom instruction, consisting of lecture, video modeling, role-play and feedback with a simulated client, was sufficient for seven participants and in vivo feedback was necessary for four participants. Accurate performance was maintained at a 4 week follow-up for 8 participants. Data show that following skill acquisition there was an increase in the variety of stimuli assessed which presents an opportunity to identify diverse preferences. Additionally, each brief paired-stimulus preference assessment took less than 30 s to complete, suggesting that it is practical for therapists to regularly assess preference during their therapy sessions. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Najdowski A.C.,University of Nevada, Reno | Najdowski A.C.,Center for Autism and Related Disorders Inc. | Wallace M.D.,California State University, Los Angeles | Reagon K.,Utah State University | And 5 more authors.
Behavioral Interventions | Year: 2010

Evaluating effects of utilizing parents as therapists for treating behavior problems has become increasingly important in the dissemination and practice of applied behavior analysis. However, home-based parent training approaches have been underused in treating feeding problems. In this study, mothers were trained to implement differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) combined with non-removal of the spoon and demand fading for the treatment of their childrens' food selectivity. The procedures were highly effective and generalization to untargeted foods was observed. Parent procedural integrity and parent collected interobserver agreement (IOA) data remain high throughout the study. This study also demonstrated an effective method for systematically decreasing reinforcement magnitude and schedules in an effort to mimic traditional reinforcer delivery such as intermittently providing a dessert at the end of the meal. Finally, this study successfully increased a demand fading ratio of 50-150% without noticeable side effects. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Source

Discover hidden collaborations