Center for Aromatic Plants

Dehradun, India

Center for Aromatic Plants

Dehradun, India
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Malik T.,Gurukul Kangri University | Malik T.,Dolphin PG Institute of Biomedical and Natural science | Singh P.,Gurukul Kangri University | Pant S.,Dolphin PG Institute of Biomedical and Natural science | And 2 more authors.
Phytotherapy Research | Year: 2011

The recent approach of using herbs and antibiotics in combination constitutes a strategy to overcome the problems of resistance and side effects associated with conventional antibiotics. In the present study, the antimicrobial effect of Pelargonium graveolens L' Hér essential oil in combination with ciprofloxacin was evaluated on uropathogens, namely, Klebsiella pneumoniae KT2, Proteus mirabilis PRT3 and Staphylococcus aureus ST2. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of P. graveolens essential oil and ciprofloxacin were determined by the microbroth dilution method and further, the interaction between these two agents was studied by a checkerboard method. The fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) was calculated to be 0.375 for both K. pneumoniae KT2 and P. mirabilis PRT3, while for S. aureus ST2 it was found to be 0.5. The values of FICI for the tested microorganisms were found to be ≤0.5, which indicates synergism between P. graveolens essential oil and ciprofloxacin. The concave shaped curve in the isobolograms also depicted a synergistic effect of P. graveolens essential oil and ciprofloxacin against the tested microorganisms. Hence, the synergistic action of P. graveolens essential oil and ciprofloxacin may be applied for the treatment of UTIs, which have hitherto been treated by using only synthetic drugs. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Singh S.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Haider S.Z.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Chauhan N.K.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Lohani H.,Center for Aromatic Plants | And 2 more authors.
Indian Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences | Year: 2014

A field experiment on the effect of time of harvesting on yield and quality of Melissa officinalis L. was conducted under the agroclimatic conditions of Doon valley, Uttarakhand in order to assess the performance of four harvesting times (H 1 -120 days, H 2 -140 days, H 3 -160 days and H 4 -180 days after planting). The fresh and dry herbage and oil yield of the aerial parts showed greater response in H 3 i.e. harvesting at 160 days after planting, followed by H 2 harvesting time. The quality of essential oil was evaluated using GC and GC-MS analysis. Geranial (24.53 %) and neral (18.80 %) were the major constituents found in the essential oil followed by trans-caryophyllene (7.70 %).


Mohan M.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Zafar Haider S.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Anand A.K.,Planet Herbs Lifesciences P Ltd. | Srivastva A.K.,Planet Herbs Lifesciences P Ltd.
International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences | Year: 2011

The aim of present work was to validate the high performance liquid chromatographic method for the analysis of enalapril maleate in pharmaceutical formulation. The method valdation of enalapril maleate was performed by using Hypersil MOS, 5μ (250 mm x 4.6 mm) as stationary phase with mobile phase consists of buffer solution and Acetonitrile (40:60) at flow rate of 1.5 ml/min. The column temperature and wavelength were monitored at 65°C and 215 nm, respectively. The injection volume was 50 μl for the run time 25 min. The validated method found within limits in all validated parameters and is quick and reliable for quantitative analysis as well as quality control of enalapril maleate in pharmaceutical formulation.


Anand A.K.,Planet Herbs Life science | Mohan M.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Zafar Haider S.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Sharma A.,Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine
International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences | Year: 2011

The essential oils obtained from aerial parts of three Ocimum species from India were investigated by GC and GC/MS. The volatile oil of Ocimum basilicum afforded methyl chevicol (70.04%) as a major constituent followed by linalyl acetate (22.54%). Camphor (56.07%), DL-limonene (13.56%) and camphene (7.32%) were obtained in a high concentration in Ocimum kilimandscharicum, whereas in Ocimum gratissimum eugenol (53.89%) was the most abundant component followed by cis-ocimene (23.97%) and germacrene-D (10.36%). Antimicrobial activities of the three oils were found against Gram +ve bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis) and Gram -ve bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) as well as yeast Candida albicans, and these results were discussed with the compositions of each sample.


Chauhan N.K.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Singh S.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Zafar Haider S.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Lohani H.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Kushwaha B.L.,P.A. College
Journal of Pharmacy Research | Year: 2013

Background: This investigation aims to determine the variation in essential oil compositions in plant parts (whole plant, leaves, spikes and husk) of Perilla (Perilla frutescens L.) at 3 different sowing times and also to ensure the suitability of this crop in Doon valley climatic conditions for commercial cultivation. Methods: During the course of study, seeds were sown at 25 days intervals in the month of May, June and July with 60 30 cm spacing. The essential oils from all the samples were hydro-distilled using a Clevenger-type apparatus and analyzed by GC/MS. Results and discussion: In all the oils, perilla ketone (43.49-90.28%) and 1-methyl-2- methylene trans-decalin (4.49-36.11%) were found to be the most abundant compounds. Conclusion: On the basis of comparative composition, D1 stage (seeds sown on 20th May) showed better results as compared with D2 (seeds sown on 15th June) and D3 (seeds sown on 10th July). © 2013, JPR Solutions; Published by Reed Elsevier India Pvt. Ltd.


Haider S.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Mohan M.,Dav Pg College | Andola H.,Doon University
Pharmacognosy Research | Year: 2014

Background: The genus Artemisia is important due to its medicinal properties as well as vital aroma compounds of commercial value. Objective: The aim of the study was to explore the potential of the essential oil of Artemisia indica wildly growing in Uttarakhand. Materials and Methods: The aerial parts of Artemisia indica Willd. (Asteraceae), collected from wild growing habitat of Garhwal Himalaya, Uttarakhand (north of India) at full flowering stage were hydro-distilled and gave pale yellow oil with the yield of 0.8% (v/w). The obtained essential oil was analyzed by GC and GC-MS and identified 32 components, amounting 95.42% of the oil. Results: Among detected compounds, the principal component was found to be davanone (30.80%), followed by β-pinene (15.30%) and germacrene-D (5.82%). Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on A. indica from Himalayan region of India, which detected davanone as major component. The species, collected from a specific location, can be explored for isolation of davanone for its industrial utilization and as alternate source of Artemisia pallens, which have already established commercial value.


Haider S.Z.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Andola H.C.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Mohan M.,P.A. College
Indian Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences | Year: 2012

The essential oils isolated from the aerial parts of two different populations of Artemisia gmelinii growing in Uttarakhand Himalaya region were analysed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in order to determine the variation of concentration in their constituents. Artemisia ketone was detected as a major constituent in both the populations i.e., Niti valley and Jhelum samples. Niti oil was found to have considerably greater amounts of artemesia ketone (53.34%) followed by α-thujone (9.91%) and 1,8-cineole (6.57%), Similarly, the first major compound in Jhelum oil was artemesia ketone (40.87%), whereas ar-curcumene (8.54%) was identified as a second major compound followed by α-thujone (4.04%). Artemisia ketone can be useful for perfumery and fragrance to introduce new and interesting herbaceous notes.


Chauhan N.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Singh S.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Haider S.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Lohani H.,Center for Aromatic Plants
Indian Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences | Year: 2013

A field experiment was conducted under the agroclimatic conditions of Doon valley, in order to determine the effects of phenological stages on herbage yield and quality of oil in oregano (Origanum vulgare L.). Plants were harvested in five phenological stages, i.e. early vegetative, late vegetative, flower initiation, full bloom, and fruit set stages. Results showed the significant effects of phenological stages on herbage, yield, and quality of oregano. Harvesting at full bloom stage showed better results in terms of herbage and oil yield. The quality of essential oil was evaluated using GC and GC/MS. Thymol content was rich in all the stages (46.90-62.26%) followed by g-terpinene (1.11-11.75%) and p-cymene (3.11-5.32%).


Seth R.,DAV PG College | Zafar Haider S.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Mohan M.,DAV PG College
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge | Year: 2014

This review highlights the pharmacology, biological properties and traditional uses of a very important folklore medicine, known as 'Keeda jadi'. In nature, it is found at high altitudes of 3500-5000 m on the high Himalayan mountains in India, Nepal and Tibet. It is an entomo-fungal combination of a larva of small moth, Hepialus armoricanus and a parasite fungus Cordyceps sinensis. Cordyceps is best known medicine for increasing physical stamina and sexual functions. It has been traditionally used to treat patients with heart disease and also shown to increase liver, kidney and lung functions. C. sinensis is unique and valuable for its medicinal properties. Many studies support that it has diverse biological activities and pharmacological potential, while it is not extracted sustainable in planned way. So, awareness and scientific knowledge is very necessary for the future prospects of Cordyceps such as conservation, sustainable harvesting, cultivation practices and trade.


Mohan M.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Haider S.Z.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Andola H.C.,Center for Aromatic Plants | Purohit V.K.,Hemwati Nandan Bahuguna Garhwal University
Research Journal of Pharmaceutical, Biological and Chemical Sciences | Year: 2011

The environmental problems caused by overuse of pesticides have been the matter of concern for both scientists and public in recent years. It has been estimated that about 2.5 million tons of pesticides are used on crops each year and the worldwide damage caused by pesticides reaches $100 billion annually. Natural products are an excellent alternative to synthetic pesticides as a means to reduce negative impacts to human health and the environment. The move towards green chemistry processes and the continuing need for developing new crop protection tools with novel modes of action makes discovery and commercialization of natural products as green pesticides are good alternatives to chemical pesticides. Green pesticides are eco-friendly, economic, target-specific and biodegradable. Many plant essential oils show a broad spectrum of activity against pest insects and plant pathogenic fungi ranging from insecticidal, antifeedant, repellent, oviposition deterrent, growth regulatory and antivector activities. This special regulatory status combined with the wide availability of essential oils from the flavor and fragrance industries, has made it possible to fast track commercialization of essential oil-based pesticides. Though well received by consumers for use against home and garden pests, these "green pesticides" can also prove effective in agricultural situations, particularly for organic food production. Further, while resistance development continues to be an issue for many synthetic pesticides, it is likely that resistance will develop more slowly to essential oil based pesticides owing to the complex mixtures of constituents that characterize pesticides based on plant essential oils or their constituents have demonstrated efficacy against a range of stored product pests, domestic pests, blood feeding pests etc. These features indicate that pesticides based on plant essential oils could be used in a variety of ways to control a large number of pests. Some essential oil constituents, for example, limonene, pulegone, citronellal and 1,8-cineole are active ingredients of commercially available flea shampoos, mosquito repellents and different agrochemicals.

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