Center for Animal Welfare

Hertfordshire, United Kingdom

Center for Animal Welfare

Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
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News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Silver Spring, MD – Anthony Comuzzie, Ph.D., FTOS, a world-renowned obesity researcher, scientist and co-director of the TOPS Nutrition and Obesity Research Center at Texas Biomedical Research Institute, will serve as the new executive director of The Obesity Society (TOS). “We are pleased to welcome Dr. Comuzzie to The Obesity Society,” said TOS President Allen Levine, Ph.D., FTOS. “He is an accomplished scientist, well respected among his peers and has the experience and dedication to successfully helm our professional society. We greatly look forward to his ideas and plans for TOS as it continues to be a leader in the field of obesity.” Dr. Comuzzie has more than 25 years of research experience focused on the genetics of obesity. He is active in numerous scientific societies, served as a member of the NHLBI Expert Panel on Obesity and Overweight, and continues to serve on the Board of Trustees for the Scientists Center for Animal Welfare (SCAW). Dr. Comuzzie also sat on TOS’s Executive Committee as Secretary/Treasurer before accepting the position of executive director. Additionally, Dr. Comuzzie serves as Editor of Frontiers in Applied Genetic Epidemiology, is an Associate Editor for BMC Medical Genetics, and is a member of the editorial board of the International Journal of Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics. He is a recognized expert and advisor on the genetics of obesity and has published more than 250 journal articles. “The Obesity Society has a unique mission in its dedication to obesity research and treatment,” said Dr. Comuzzie.” Knowing firsthand just how special this organization is, I’m honored and excited to be a part of it.” This press release can be published in full or in part with attribution to The Obesity Society. The Obesity Society (TOS) is the leading professional society dedicated to better understanding, preventing and treating obesity. Through research, education and advocacy, TOS is committed to improving the lives of those affected by the disease. For more information visit: www.Obesity.org.  Connect with us on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. Find information about industry relationships here. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/e4a8cfb8-477c-4c89-b0f3-21da9e1d1a99


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Silver Spring, MD – Anthony Comuzzie, Ph.D., FTOS, a world-renowned obesity researcher, scientist and co-director of the TOPS Nutrition and Obesity Research Center at Texas Biomedical Research Institute, will serve as the new executive director of The Obesity Society (TOS). “We are pleased to welcome Dr. Comuzzie to The Obesity Society,” said TOS President Allen Levine, Ph.D., FTOS. “He is an accomplished scientist, well respected among his peers and has the experience and dedication to successfully helm our professional society. We greatly look forward to his ideas and plans for TOS as it continues to be a leader in the field of obesity.” Dr. Comuzzie has more than 25 years of research experience focused on the genetics of obesity. He is active in numerous scientific societies, served as a member of the NHLBI Expert Panel on Obesity and Overweight, and continues to serve on the Board of Trustees for the Scientists Center for Animal Welfare (SCAW). Dr. Comuzzie also sat on TOS’s Executive Committee as Secretary/Treasurer before accepting the position of executive director. Additionally, Dr. Comuzzie serves as Editor of Frontiers in Applied Genetic Epidemiology, is an Associate Editor for BMC Medical Genetics, and is a member of the editorial board of the International Journal of Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics. He is a recognized expert and advisor on the genetics of obesity and has published more than 250 journal articles. “The Obesity Society has a unique mission in its dedication to obesity research and treatment,” said Dr. Comuzzie.” Knowing firsthand just how special this organization is, I’m honored and excited to be a part of it.” This press release can be published in full or in part with attribution to The Obesity Society. The Obesity Society (TOS) is the leading professional society dedicated to better understanding, preventing and treating obesity. Through research, education and advocacy, TOS is committed to improving the lives of those affected by the disease. For more information visit: www.Obesity.org.  Connect with us on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. Find information about industry relationships here. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/e4a8cfb8-477c-4c89-b0f3-21da9e1d1a99


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Silver Spring, MD – Anthony Comuzzie, Ph.D., FTOS, a world-renowned obesity researcher, scientist and co-director of the TOPS Nutrition and Obesity Research Center at Texas Biomedical Research Institute, will serve as the new executive director of The Obesity Society (TOS). “We are pleased to welcome Dr. Comuzzie to The Obesity Society,” said TOS President Allen Levine, Ph.D., FTOS. “He is an accomplished scientist, well respected among his peers and has the experience and dedication to successfully helm our professional society. We greatly look forward to his ideas and plans for TOS as it continues to be a leader in the field of obesity.” Dr. Comuzzie has more than 25 years of research experience focused on the genetics of obesity. He is active in numerous scientific societies, served as a member of the NHLBI Expert Panel on Obesity and Overweight, and continues to serve on the Board of Trustees for the Scientists Center for Animal Welfare (SCAW). Dr. Comuzzie also sat on TOS’s Executive Committee as Secretary/Treasurer before accepting the position of executive director. Additionally, Dr. Comuzzie serves as Editor of Frontiers in Applied Genetic Epidemiology, is an Associate Editor for BMC Medical Genetics, and is a member of the editorial board of the International Journal of Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics. He is a recognized expert and advisor on the genetics of obesity and has published more than 250 journal articles. “The Obesity Society has a unique mission in its dedication to obesity research and treatment,” said Dr. Comuzzie.” Knowing firsthand just how special this organization is, I’m honored and excited to be a part of it.” This press release can be published in full or in part with attribution to The Obesity Society. The Obesity Society (TOS) is the leading professional society dedicated to better understanding, preventing and treating obesity. Through research, education and advocacy, TOS is committed to improving the lives of those affected by the disease. For more information visit: www.Obesity.org.  Connect with us on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. Find information about industry relationships here. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/e4a8cfb8-477c-4c89-b0f3-21da9e1d1a99


Toaff-Rosenstein R.L.,Center for Animal Welfare | Velez M.,University of California at Davis | Tucker C.B.,Center for Animal Welfare
Journal of Dairy Science | Year: 2017

Healthy cattle readily use grooming brushes but this behavior subsides when animals become ill. Tracking use of a brush may provide an opportunity for health monitoring, especially if the process could be automated. We assessed how healthy heifers groom themselves on a brush and hypothesized that radiofrequency identification (RFID) could be used to accurately and automatically record this behavior. Angus and Hereford heifers (n = 16) were fitted with 2 ultra-high-frequency RFID ear tags and monitored in groups of 8 while housed in a pen with an electronic brush, video cameras, and 4 RFID antennas. Each heifer was observed for a 6-h period using continuous video recordings, and brush contact was characterized in terms of anatomic region involved (head/neck, trunk, or posterior) and when not touching the brush but within 1 body length of it. The RFID data were collected for the same period and then processed such that intervals of up to 16 s with no detections but contained between 2 recordings were also considered positive (animal in brush proximity). Brush proximity (RFID) was regressed against brush contact duration (video) and the sensitivity and specificity for each individual heifer calculated. Across heifers, the majority of brush use involved the head/neck, although a few heifers demonstrated relatively large amounts of posterior contact, which contributed to false-negative readings when antennas failed to read the ear tags. Furthermore, for the majority of time that animals were near the brush, they were not in contact with it but rather standing or lying nearby, resulting in false-positive readings. It follows that the ability of the RFID system to accurately detect brush contact varied widely across individual heifers (sensitivity 0.54-1.0; specificity 0.59-0.98), with RFID generally overestimating the duration of brush proximity relative to actual time spent in brush contact. The implication is that RFID-based ear tag recording of brush proximity relative to continuous video observations of contact does not yield accurate results in certain heifers and therefore, as currently configured, is not a reliable representation of this type of grooming behavior. © 2017 American Dairy Science Association.


Reix Nee Broster C.E.,University of Bristol | Burn C.C.,Center for Animal Welfare | Pritchard J.C.,University of Bristol | Barr A.R.S.,University of Bristol | Whay H.R.,University of Bristol
Equine Veterinary Journal | Year: 2014

Reasons for performing the study: Lameness is prevalent in working donkeys and has major welfare implications; however, a detailed study of the associated clinical signs is lacking. Objectives: To describe the range and prevalence of clinical signs and conformation associated with lameness in working draught donkeys. Study design: Prospective, cross-sectional, observational study. Methods: Data were collected from 102 working draught donkeys in Pakistan. A lameness assessment adapted for working donkeys was used to record clinical signs of lameness, gait, limb conformation and pain responses in the feet, limbs and spine using observation, palpation and manipulation. Lameness at the walk was scored from 0 to 10 (sound to nonweightbearing). Results: Every donkey examined had gait abnormalities, with 5% having a nonweightbearing limb. Lameness was significantly more severe with older age, lower body condition score and forward-at-the-knee conformation. More severe lameness was also associated with pain responses in the hoof walls, palpation of limb joints and spinal flexion. Joint, tendon and foot pathology was highly prevalent, as well as pain responses to joint flexion and spinal manipulation. Conformational abnormalities showed lateral asymmetries. Conclusions: Over 98% of the world's 42.2 million donkeys are in low-income countries, most being used for work. The high prevalence of lameness, pain and multiple limb and spinal abnormalities in working donkeys is of great welfare concern and highlights the complexity of addressing this problem. This standardised lameness assessment can be used when implementing and monitoring interventions to reduce lameness prevalence in working donkeys. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.


Clark F.E.,Center for Animal Welfare | Clark F.E.,UK Institute of Zoology | Smith L.J.,Center for Animal Welfare
American Journal of Primatology | Year: 2013

Exploration and problem-solving are highly motivated behaviors in non-human primates, but little research has focused on whether cognitively challenging tasks can enhance primates' psychological well-being, particularly in the absence of food rewards. We evaluated whether a novel cognitive challenge device (CCD) consisting of a maze of opaque tubes enhanced the well-being of a group of six adult chimpanzees housed at ZSL Whipsnade Zoo, UK, over a two-month period. Chimpanzees had the opportunity to interact with two versions of the CCD: the first contained tokens which fell into a transparent chamber when extracted from the CCD and could not be eaten. The second contained unshelled Brazil nuts, which could be extracted and eaten. CCD-use was low over the study, occupying on average 2.5% of observation time. However, compared to baseline levels, chimpanzees exhibited more problem-solving behaviors (directed toward the CCD) and spent significantly more time engaged in social play when the CCD was present. Cage exploration was rare whether the CCD was present or not. Chimpanzees used the CCD (including tool-use) significantly more when it contained tokens. The relationship between the presence of the CCD and self-directed behavior (rough-scratching) was difficult to interpret. Although rough-scratching was significantly higher in the cage when the CCD was present and 18% of these scratching events occurred within one arm's length from the CCD, rough-scratching decreased when device use increased. This study provides a preliminary investigation of the CCD and two reward types, and suggests how the design could be modified to enhance its effects. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Rutherford L.,Royal Veterinary College | Wessmann A.,University of Glasgow | Rusbridge C.,Stone Lion Veterinary Hospital | McGonnell I.M.,Royal Veterinary College | And 3 more authors.
Veterinary Journal | Year: 2012

Chiari-like malformation (CM)/syringomyelia (SM) is a disease complex recognised in Cavalier King Charles spaniels (CKCSs) that can lead to neuropathic pain (NeP). In humans, NeP is associated with anxiety, depression and reduced quality of life (QoL). In this study, databases of three specialist veterinary centres were searched and CKCS breed societies and health forums were contacted to identify CKCS with an imaging diagnosis of CM/SM. Owners completed questionnaires on behaviour, signalment, general health status, NeP and QoL. Data were analysed from 122 dogs out of 564 questionnaires completed, after incomplete questionnaires and data from dogs that had other potentially debilitating disease processes were excluded. NeP severity score was significantly and positively correlated with 'stranger-directed' fear (rS=0.28), non-social fear (rS=0.34), 'separation-related' behaviour (rS=0.38), attachment behaviour (rS=0.24), excitability (rS=0.21) and proxy for pain sensation (rS=0.29). Increased NeP was also significantly associated with decreased QoL (rS=0.47), ability to settle (rS=0.26) and willingness to exercise (rS=0.50). Severity of NeP was positively associated with certain fear-associated behaviour and with decreased owner-perceived QoL. Thus, neurobehavioural changes should be considered in the management of NeP in CKCS with CM/SM. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


O'Connor E.A.,Center for Animal Welfare | Parker M.O.,Center for Animal Welfare | Davey E.L.,Center for Animal Welfare | Grist H.,Center for Animal Welfare | And 5 more authors.
British Poultry Science | Year: 2011

1. Commercial laying hens are commonly housed in noisy and dim environments, yet relatively little is known about whether these conditions, particularly in combination, have any effect on welfare or egg production.2. The study was designed to investigate whether chronic exposure to continuous noise (60 dB(A) vs. 80 dB(A)) and/or light intensity (150 lux vs. 5 lux) during the critical period of coming into lay (16-24 weeks of age) influenced behaviour (activity, resting and feather maintenance), physiological stress (plasma corticosterone and heterophil to lymphocyte ratio) and production (number and weight of eggs laid) in laying hens.3. Hens in the low light pens were less active and preened and dust-bathed more than those housed in 150 lux; hens in the high noise pens rested more frequently than those in quieter pens.4. There was no evidence that chronic exposure to low light or high noise caused appreciable physiological stress but egg production was affected by these conditions. Hens kept in pens with low light or high noise laid fewer eggs per day than those kept in high light or low noise pens. These effects were additive, so that the fewest eggs were laid by hens subject to both low light and high noise.5. These results show that low light intensity and continual high background noise have a detrimental effect on egg production in the early laying phase as well as influencing the time allocated to different behaviours. However there was no strong evidence for a physiological stress response to either of these conditions or their combination. © 2011 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


PubMed | Help in Suffering, Animals in International Development, University of Bristol, Praxis Institute for Participatory Practices and Center for Animal Welfare
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Participatory methods are increasingly used in international human development, but scientific evaluation of their efficacy versus a control group is rare. Working horses support families in impoverished communities. Lameness and limb abnormalities are highly prevalent in these animals and a cause for welfare concern. We aimed to stimulate and evaluate improvements in lameness and limb abnormalities in horses whose owners took part in a 2-year participatory intervention project to reduce lameness (PI) versus a control group (C) in Jaipur, India.In total, 439 owners of 862 horses participated in the study. PI group owners from 21 communities were encouraged to meet regularly to discuss management and work practices influencing lameness and poor welfare and to track their own progress in improving these. Lameness examinations (41 parameters) were conducted at the start of the study (Baseline), and after 1 year and 2 years. Results were compared with control horses from a further 21 communities outside the intervention. Of the 149 horses assessed on all three occasions, PI horses showed significantly (P<0.05) greater improvement than C horses in 20 parameters, most notably overall lameness score, measures of sole pain and range of movement on limb flexion. Control horses showed slight but significantly greater improvements in four parameters, including frog quality in fore and hindlimbs.This participatory intervention succeeded in improving lameness and some limb abnormalities in working horses, by encouraging changes in management and work practices which were feasible within owners socioeconomic and environmental constraints. Demonstration of the potentially sustainable improvements achieved here should encourage further development of participatory intervention approaches to benefit humans and animals in other contexts.


PubMed | Center for Animal Welfare
Type: Journal Article | Journal: American journal of primatology | Year: 2013

Exploration and problem-solving are highly motivated behaviors in non-human primates, but little research has focused on whether cognitively challenging tasks can enhance primates psychological well-being, particularly in the absence of food rewards. We evaluated whether a novel cognitive challenge device (CCD) consisting of a maze of opaque tubes enhanced the well-being of a group of six adult chimpanzees housed at ZSL Whipsnade Zoo, UK, over a two-month period. Chimpanzees had the opportunity to interact with two versions of the CCD: the first contained tokens which fell into a transparent chamber when extracted from the CCD and could not be eaten. The second contained unshelled Brazil nuts, which could be extracted and eaten. CCD-use was low over the study, occupying on average 2.5% of observation time. However, compared to baseline levels, chimpanzees exhibited more problem-solving behaviors (directed toward the CCD) and spent significantly more time engaged in social play when the CCD was present. Cage exploration was rare whether the CCD was present or not. Chimpanzees used the CCD (including tool-use) significantly more when it contained tokens. The relationship between the presence of the CCD and self-directed behavior (rough-scratching) was difficult to interpret. Although rough-scratching was significantly higher in the cage when the CCD was present and 18% of these scratching events occurred within one arms length from the CCD, rough-scratching decreased when device use increased. This study provides a preliminary investigation of the CCD and two reward types, and suggests how the design could be modified to enhance its effects.

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