Center for Advanced Research in Natural Resources and Management

Dhaka, Bangladesh

Center for Advanced Research in Natural Resources and Management

Dhaka, Bangladesh

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Rahman S.C.,Independent University, Bangladesh | Rahman S.C.,Lawachara Snake Research and Conservation Project | Rashid S.M.A.,Lawachara Snake Research and Conservation Project | Rashid S.M.A.,Center for Advanced Research in Natural Resources and Management | And 2 more authors.
Herpetological Journal | Year: 2013

During the last decades annual activity patterns of temperate snake species have received considerably more attention than those of tropical snakes. In this study, we document the monthly activity patterns of a species-rich assemblage of snakes from a tropical forest-plantation mosaic in Bangladesh based on specimens collected by a systematic road kill survey for 14 months, and relate them to the climatic characteristics of the study area with special reference to monsoon regimes. We recorded 503 Dead-On-Road (DOR) snakes, belonging to 30 different species, with a mean DOR/km rate of 0.247. Overall, snake activity was uneven throughout the year, being particularly intense during July, August and October, and significantly reduced in December, January and February. Five out of nine species with considerably robust sample sizes showed consistently uneven monthly activity patterns. Monsoon seasonality deeply influenced the phenology of several Asian-tropical snakes, with some species being active especially at the middle or end of the monsoon period while others are active throughout the monsoon period.


Rahman S.C.,Center for Advanced Research in Natural Resources and Management | Rashid S.M.A.,Center for Advanced Research in Natural Resources and Management | Datta R.,Center for Advanced Research in Natural Resources and Management | Mro P.,Center for Advanced Research in Natural Resources and Management | Roy C.J.,Center for Advanced Research in Natural Resources and Management
Chelonian Conservation and Biology | Year: 2015

The Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) comprises an extensive expanse of hills located in the far southeast of Bangladesh, bordered by India and Myanmar. CHT covers more than 10% of the total land area of Bangladesh and lies within the Indo-Burma Biodiversity Hotspot. Because of political instability and the generally remote nature of this region, it remains as the least explored area in Bangladesh. Very little is known about the chelonian fauna of CHT. We investigated the occurrence, conservation status, and exploitation of chelonians in the southern part of CHT, in Sangu-Matamuhuri Reserve Forest and adjacent areas, from 2011 to 2015. During our survey, we obtained specimen-based records of 8 species: Arakan Forest Turtle (Heosemys depressa), Asian Brown Tortoise (Manouria emys), Keeled Box Turtle (Cuora mouhotii), Elongated Tortoise (Indotestudo elongata), Sylhet Roofed Turtle1 (Pangshura sylhetensis), Asian Leaf Turtle (Cyclemys spp.), Malayan Softshell Turtle (Amyda ornata), and Indian Flapshell Turtle (Lissemys punctata). The critically endangered H. depressa and the endangered C. mouhotii are recorded from Bangladesh for the first time, and the endangered P. sylhetensis is recorded from CHT for the first time. We documented 2 isolated populations of M. emys in the Sangu-Matamuhuri Reserve Forest. We did not find any evidence of large-scale, commercial turtle harvesting in our survey area. Subsistence hunting is probably the most immediate threat to chelonians in this region. With no intervention, subsistence hunting will likely cause large-scale local extirpation of extant, low-density populations. Considering the species diversity and the opportunities for long-term conservation, CHT may be considered to be a priority site for conservation of these species in danger. To mitigate turtle hunting, we recommend a bottom-up, community-based conservation model, the foundation of which should be based on trust, traditional ecological knowledge, community participation, and ecological science. © 2015 Chelonian Research Foundation.


Rashid S.M.A.,Independent University, Bangladesh | Rashid S.M.A.,Lawachara Snake Research and Conservation Project | Rashid S.M.A.,Center for Advanced Research in Natural Resources and Management | Luiselli L.,Lawachara Snake Research and Conservation Project | Rahman S.C.,Center for Advanced Research in Natural Resources and Management
Amphibia Reptilia | Year: 2013

Despite the growing trends in quantitative field studies on tropical snake assemblages around the world, Asian tropical snake assemblages have remained less profoundly studied. A snake assemblage in an altered tropical forest-plantation mosaic in Bangladesh was studied for six months. Data were collected on the species composition and their relative frequency of occurrence. On the basis of these data, some major patterns highlighted by earlier studies on tropical snake ecology were tested. More specifically, we tested, the existence of: (1) non-random habitat niche partitioning, (2) the energetic equivalence rule, and (3) different mean body sizes among snake guilds, with distinctly smaller body sizes being expected among the subterranean species. A total of 374 specimens belonging to 34 different species were collected. High mean habitat niche overlap among species was observed, and there was no apparent non-random niche partitioning by snakes either considering all species together or dividing them by guild. The 'energetic equivalence rule' was verified, with larger species being less abundant than smaller species. Body sizes differed significantly across species' habits, with subterranean species being not only significantly smaller but also revealing the least interspecific variation, and terrestrial/arboreal species showing the greatest interspecific variation. Overall, tropical Asian snake assemblages seem to be similar to tropical African snake assemblages in terms of their general organization. © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2013.

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