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Vandenberge V.,Belgium Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research | Delezie E.,Belgium Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research | Huyghebaert G.,Belgium Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research | Delahaut P.,Center dEconomie Rurale | And 3 more authors.
Food Additives and Contaminants - Part A Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure and Risk Assessment | Year: 2012

In the poultry industry, the widespread use of veterinary drugs such as antimicrobial compounds may lead to the presence of residues in whole eggs, egg white and egg yolk. During this study, laying hens received experimental feed containing sulfadiazine or doxycycline at cross-contamination levels of 2.5%, 5% and 10% of the therapeutic concentration. Since the therapeutic dose is 250 mg kg-1 for both substances, cross-contamination concentrations in the feed of 6.25, 12.5 and 25 mg kg-1 were expected. Whole egg, egg white and egg yolk samples were collected during the treatment and depletion period and were analysed via liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. For both drugs, a plateau phase was reached within 3-5 days and residue concentrations were detected in all egg matrices. For the 10% cross-contamination group, residual sulfadiazine concentrations of 208, 299 and 60 μg kg-1 and residual doxycycline concentrations of 455, 332, 206 μg kg-1 were detected in whole egg, egg white and egg yolk on day 13 of the treatment period, respectively. Both sulfadiazine and doxycycline had higher concentrations in egg white than in egg yolk, but the egg white-egg yolk ratio was higher for sulfadiazine than for doxycycline. As neither drug is allowed in Belgium for use in laying hens, residues may pose food safety concerns. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC. Source


Vandenberge V.,Belgium Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research | Delezie E.,Belgium Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research | Huyghebaert G.,Belgium Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research | Delahaut P.,Center dEconomie Rurale | And 2 more authors.
Food Additives and Contaminants - Part A Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure and Risk Assessment | Year: 2012

Veterinary drugs, such as antimicrobial compounds, are widely used in poultry and may lead to the presence of residues in matrices of animal origin, such as muscle and liver tissue. In this study, broilers received an experimental feed containing sulfadiazine or doxycycline at cross-contamination levels of 2.5, 5 and 10% of the therapeutic dose in feed. Breast and thigh muscle and liver samples were collected during treatment and depletion period and analysed via liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Concentrations reached a plateau phase 3-5 days after the start of experimental feeding. A rapid depletion of residues was noted after withdrawal of the experimental feed. No significant differences in measured concentrations were observed between the various muscle types. Residue concentrations for some experimental groups; the 10% group of sulfadiazine and the 5 and 10% group of doxycycline, however, exceeded their corresponding maximum residue limits (MRLs). © 2012 Taylor & Francis. Source


Tretzel L.,German Sport University Cologne | Thomas A.,German Sport University Cologne | Geyer H.,German Sport University Cologne | Delahaut P.,Center dEconomie Rurale | And 2 more authors.
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry | Year: 2015

Abstract Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling, a technique used for taking whole blood samples dried on a filter paper, was initially reported in 1963 by Robert Guthrie. While the diagnostic analysis of metabolic disorders in newborns was the focus of investigations at that time, the number of established applications for preclinical drug development, toxicological studies, and therapeutic drug monitoring increased enormously in the last decades. As a consequence of speed, simplicity, and minimal invasiveness, DBS recommends itself as the preferential technique in sports drug testing. The present approach highlights for the first time the development of a screening assay for the analysis of the synthetic human adrenocorticotropic hormone tetracosactide hexaacetate (Synacthen®) in DBS using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Highly purified sample extracts were obtained by an advanced sample preparation procedure including the addition of an internal standard (d8-tetracosactide) and immunoaffinity purification. The method's overall recovery was 27.6 %, and the assay's imprecision was calculated between 8.1 and 17.9 % for intraday and 12.9 to 20.5 % for interday measurements. Stability of the synthetic peptide in DBS was shown for at least 10 days at room temperature and presents a major benefit, since a rapid degradation in conventionally applied matrices such as urine or plasma is well known. With a limit of detection of 50 pg/mL, a detection window of several hours is expected considering reported steady-state plasma levels of 300 pg/mL after intramuscular application of Synacthen® Depot (1 mg). The analysis of authentic DBS samples within the scope of an administration study with 250 μg Synacthen® (short stimulation test) demonstrated the great potential of the developed assay to simplify the analysis of Synacthen® for doping control purposes. © 2015 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source


McNamee S.E.,Queens University of Belfast | Elliott C.T.,Queens University of Belfast | Delahaut P.,Center dEconomie Rurale | Campbell K.,Queens University of Belfast
Environmental Science and Pollution Research | Year: 2013

A multiplex surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor method for the detection of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins, okadaic acid (and analogues) and domoic acid was developed. This method was compared to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. Seawater samples (n = 256) from around Europe were collected by the consortia of an EU project MIcroarrays for the Detection of Toxic Algae (MIDTAL) and evaluated using each method. A simple sample preparation procedure was developed which involved lysing and releasing the toxins from the algal cells with glass beads followed by centrifugation and filtering the extract before testing for marine biotoxins by both multi-SPR and ELISA. Method detection limits based on IC20 values for PSP, okadaic acid and domoic acid toxins were 0.82, 0.36 and 1.66 ng/ml, respectively, for the prototype multiplex SPR biosensor. Evaluation by SPR for seawater samples has shown that 47, 59 and 61 % of total seawater samples tested positive (result greater than the IC20) for PSP, okadaic acid (and analogues) and domoic acid toxins, respectively. Toxic samples were received mainly from Spain and Ireland. This work has demonstrated the potential of multiplex analysis for marine biotoxins in algal and seawater samples with results available for 24 samples within a 7 h period for three groups of key marine biotoxins. Multiplex immunological methods could therefore be used as early warning monitoring tools for a variety of marine biotoxins in seawater samples. © 2012 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IAPP | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-IAPP-2008 | Award Amount: 1.05M | Year: 2009

The ability to increase milk production in cow by bovine somatotropin (BST) was first demonstrated in 1930s. The use of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rBST) in dairy cows has become a common practice in the Untied States (US) and many other countries as the commercial product became available in 1994. However the use and sale of rBST in the EU has never been approved and was banned in 1999 due to concerns on animal health and welfare, food safety and quality, and human health implication associated with the administration of rBST in dairy cows. Nevertheless, there are no direct methods available to date that are capable to detect rBST. The present proposal will, by the use of new technologies and a wide range of expertise, deliver a means of screening and confirming the presence of this unwanted growth promoter in milk. The collaboration within the project will bring together a university, a public institution and two private commercial diagnostic companies to produce novel solutions for monitoring the quality and safety of foods. The proposed research project will give an opportunity of Industry-Academia collaboration that will allow the transfer of high level scientific research into much needed commercial outputs. As a consequence, both academic and industrial partners as well as communities will all benefit, not only during the project but well beyond. The major research outcome will be the delivery of a rapid and simple screening test (dipstick and/or ELISA), a highly accurate and quantitative immuno-biosensor test, and a sensitive and specific chemical confirmatory test for rapid detection and unequivocal identification of the presence of rBST in milk. The formation of partnerships will strengthen the joint efforts to advance research in food safety and quality which benefits ultimately all partners involved, the consumers and the community as a whole.

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