Shreveport, LA, United States
Shreveport, LA, United States

For other institutions of higher education using the name Centenary College, see Centenary CollegeCentenary College of Louisiana is a private, four-year arts and science college located in Shreveport, in the U.S. state of Louisiana. The College is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. Founded in 1825, it is the oldest chartered liberal arts college west of the Mississippi River and is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools . Wikipedia.


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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has ranked the best four-year and two-year colleges in Louisiana for 2017. Of the 22 four-year schools honored, Tulane University of Louisiana, Loyola University of New Orleans, Xavier University of Louisiana, Louisiana College and Louisiana State University came in as the top five. 18 two-year schools also made the list, with Louisiana State University Eunice, Delgado Community College, Southern University Shreveport, Bossier Parish Community College and Northwest Louisiana Technical College coming in at the top of the list. A full list of schools is included below. “Students looking at colleges in Louisiana have a wide variety of program options and schools to choose from,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.Org. “We’ve compared each and found the colleges that provide high quality educational experience with high student success rates as they pursue their careers.” To be included on Louisiana’s “Best Colleges” list, schools must be regionally accredited and not-for-profit. Each college was also analyzed based on more than a dozen metrics that include the annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college, availability of career counseling services, student/teacher ratio, graduation rate and financial aid availability. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Louisiana” list, visit: Louisiana’s Best Four-Year Colleges for 2017 include the following schools: Centenary College of Louisiana Dillard University Grambling State University Louisiana College Louisiana State University and Agricultural & Mechanical College Louisiana State University Alexandria Louisiana State University Shreveport Louisiana Tech University Loyola University New Orleans McNeese State University Nicholls State University Northwestern State University of Louisiana Our Lady of Holy Cross College Our Lady of the Lake College Southeastern Louisiana University Southern University and A & M College Southern University at New Orleans Tulane University of Louisiana University of Louisiana at Lafayette University of Louisiana at Monroe University of New Orleans Xavier University of Louisiana The Best Two-Year Colleges in Louisiana for 2017 include the following schools: Baton Rouge Community College Bossier Parish Community College Capital Area Technical College Central Louisiana Technical Community College Delgado Community College Fletcher Technical Community College Louisiana Delta Community College Louisiana State University-Eunice Northshore Technical Community College Northwest Louisiana Technical College Nunez Community College Remington College-Baton Rouge Campus Remington College-Lafayette Campus River Parishes Community College South Central Louisiana Technical College-Young Memorial Campus South Louisiana Community College Southern University Shreveport SOWELA Technical Community College About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


Funk G.,Centenary College of Louisiana | O'Neil D.,Bridgewater College | Winters R.M.,McGill University
International Journal of Modern Physics A | Year: 2012

The oblique parameters S, T and U and their higher-order extensions (V, W and X) are observables that combine electroweak precision data to quantify deviation from the Standard Model. These parameters were calculated at one loop in the basis-independent CP-violating Two-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM). The scalar parameter space of the 2HDM was randomly sampled within limits imposed by unitarity and found to produce values of the oblique parameters within experimental bounds, with the exception of T. The experimental limits on T were used to predict information about the mass of the charged Higgs boson and the difference in mass between the charged Higgs boson and the heaviest neutral Higgs boson. In particular, it was found that the 2HDM predicts -600 GeV < mH ±-m 3 < 100 GeV, with values of mH ± > 250 GeV being preferred. The mass scale of the new physics (M NP) produced by random sampling was consistently fairly high, with the average of the scalar masses falling between 400 and 800 GeV for $Y2 = m2$, although the model can be tuned to produce a light neutral Higgs mass (∼120 GeV). Hence, the values produced for V, W and X fell well within 0.01 of zero, confirming the robustness of the linear expansion approximation. Taking the CP-conserving limit of the model was found to not significantly affect the values generated for the oblique parameters. © 2012 World Scientific Publishing Company.


Garcia-Saura M.-F.,Boston University | Saijo F.,Boston University | Bryan N.S.,Boston University | Bauer S.,Boston University | And 3 more authors.
Antioxidants and Redox Signaling | Year: 2012

Marginal vitamin C (ascorbic acid) deficiency is a prevalent yet underappreciated risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Along with glutathione, ascorbate plays important roles in antioxidant defense and redox signaling. Production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species and their interaction, giving rise to nitroso and nitrosyl product formation, are key components of the redox regulation/signaling network. Numerous in vitro studies have demonstrated that these systems are interconnected via multiple chemical transformation reactions, but little is known about their dynamics and significance in vivo. Aims: We sought to investigate the time-course of changes in NO/redox status and vascular function during ascorbate depletion in rats unable to synthesize vitamin C. Results: We here show that both redox and protein nitros(yl)ation status in blood and vital organs vary dynamically during development of ascorbate deficiency. Prolonged marginal ascorbate deficiency is associated with cell/tissue-specific perturbations in ascorbate and glutathione redox and NO status. Scurvy develops earlier in marginally deficient compared to adequately supplemented animals, with blunted compensatory NO production and a dissociation of biochemistry from clinical symptomology in the former. Paradoxically, aortic endothelial reactivity is enhanced rather than impaired, irrespective of ascorbate status. Innovation/Conclusion: Enhanced NO production and protein nitros(yl)ation are integral responses to the redox stress of acute ascorbate deprivation. The elevated cardiovascular risk in marginal ascorbate deficiency is likely to be associated with perturbations of NO/redox-sensitive signaling nodes unrelated to the regulation of vascular tone. This new model may have merit for the future study of redox-sensitive events in marginal ascorbate deficiency. © 2012 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Milsom A.B.,Boston University | Fernandez B.O.,Boston University | Fernandez B.O.,University of Warwick | Garcia-Saura M.F.,Boston University | And 3 more authors.
Antioxidants and Redox Signaling | Year: 2012

Mice lacking all three nitric oxide synthase (NOS) genes remain viable even though deletion of the major downstream target of NO, soluble guanylyl cyclase, is associated with a dramatically shortened life expectancy. Moreover, findings of relatively normal flow responses in eNOS knockouts are generally attributed to compensatory mechanisms including upregulation of remaining NOS isoforms, but the alternative possibility that dietary nitrite/nitrate (NOx) may contribute to basal levels of NO signaling has never been investigated. Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine how NO signaling products (nitrosated and nitrosylated proteins) and NO metabolites (nitrite, nitrate) are affected by single NOS deletions and whether dietary NOx plays a compensatory role in any deficiency. Specifically, we sought to ascertain whether profound alterations of these products arise upon genetic deletion of either NOS isoform, inhibition of all NOS activity, NOx restriction, or all of the above. Results: Our results indicate that while some significant changes do indeed occur, they are surprisingly moderate and compartmentalized to specific tissues. Unexpectedly, even after pharmacological inhibition of all NOSs and restriction of dietary NOx intake in eNOS knockout mice significant levels of NO-related products remain. Innovation/Conclusion: These findings suggest that a yet unidentified source of NO, unrelated to NOSs or dietary NOx, may be sustaining basal NO signaling in tissues. Given the significance of NO for redox regulation in health and disease, it would seem to be important to identify the nature of this additional source of NO products as it may offer new therapeutic avenues for correcting NO deficiencies. © Copyright 2012, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Kim R.H.,Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center | Gilbert T.,Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center | Ristig K.,Centenary College of Louisiana
Journal of Surgical Education | Year: 2015

Background There is a growing body of literature that suggests that learners assimilate information differently, depending on their preferred learning style. The VARK model categorizes learners as visual (V), aural (A), read/write (R), kinesthetic (K), or multimodal (MM). We hypothesized that resident VARK learning style preferences and American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) performance are associated. Methods The Fleming VARK learning styles inventory was administered to all general surgery residents at a university hospital-based program each year to determine their preferred learning style. Resident scores from the 2012 and 2013 ABSITE were examined to identify any correlation with learning style preferences. Results Over a 2-year period, residents completed 53 VARK inventory assessments. Most (51%) had a multimodal preference. Dominant aural and read/write learners had the lowest and highest mean ABSITE scores, respectively (p = 0.03). Conclusion Residents with dominant read/write learning preferences perform better on the ABSITE than their peers did, whereas residents with dominant aural learning preferences underperform on the ABSITE. This may reflect an inherent and inadvertent bias of the examination against residents who prefer to learn via aural modalities. © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Kim R.H.,Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center | Gilbert T.,Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center | Ristig K.,Centenary College of Louisiana | Chu Q.D.,Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center
Journal of Surgical Research | Year: 2013

Introduction: As a consequence of surgical resident duty hour restrictions, there is a need for faculty to utilize novel teaching methods to convey information in a more efficient manner. The current paradigmof surgical training, which has not changed significantly since the time of Halsted, assumes that all residents assimilate information in a similar fashion. However, recent data has shown that learners have preferences for the ways in which they receive and process information. The VARK model categorizes learners as visual (V), aural (A), read/write (R), and kinesthetic (K). The VARK learning style preferences of surgical residents have not been previously evaluated. In this study, the preferred learning styles of general surgery residents were determined, along with faculty and resident perception of resident learning styles. In addition, we hypothesized that American Board of Surgery In-Training Exam (ABSITE) scores are associated with preference for a read/write (R) learning style. Methods: The Fleming VARK learning styles inventory was administered to all general surgery residents at a university hospitalebased program. Responses on the inventory were scored to determine the preferred learning style for each resident. Faculty members were surveyed to determine their accuracy in identifying the preferred learning style of each resident. All residents were also surveyed to determine their accuracy in identifying their peers' VARK preferences. Resident ABSITE scores were examined for association with preferred learning styles. Results: Twenty-nine residents completed the inventory. Most (18 of 29, 62%) had a multimodal preference, although more than a third (11 of 29, 38%) demonstrated a singlemodality preference. Seventy-six percent of all residents (22 of 29) had some degree of kinesthetic (K) learning, while under 50% (14 of 29) were aural (A) learners. Although not significant, dominant (R) learners had the highest mean ABSITE scores. Faculty identified residents' learning styles accurately 41% of the time; more experienced faculty were better than less experienced ones (R2 = 0.703, P = 0.018). Residents had similar accuracy to faculty in identifying their peers' learning styles. Chief residents were more accurate than junior residents (44% versus 28%, P = 0.009). © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Goadrich M.H.,Centenary College of Louisiana | Rogers M.P.,Northwest Missouri State University
SIGCSE'11 - Proceedings of the 42nd ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education | Year: 2011

In a remarkably short timeframe, developing apps for smartphones has gone from an arcane curiosity to an essential skill set. Employers are scrambling to find developers capable of transforming their ideas into apps. Educators interested in filling that void are likewise trying to keep up, and face difficult decisions in designing a meaningful course. There are a plethora of development platforms, but two stand out because of their popularity and divergent approaches - Apple's iOS, and Google's Android. In this paper, we will compare the two, and address the question: which should faculty teach?.


Aizawa K.,Centenary College of Louisiana
Cognitive Systems Research | Year: 2010

The hypothesis of extended cognition maintains that cognitive processes sometimes span the brain, body, and world. One of the most prominent types of arguments for this hypothesis begins with observations of the role of certain sorts of bodily and environmental influences on cognitive processes, then concludes that these bodily and environmental influences are themselves cognitive processes. This paper will argue that, while it is widely appreciated that the simplest versions of these " coupling arguments" are fallacious, the advocates of extended cognition still seem to underestimate how prevalent even the simplest forms are in the literature, why they are so pervasive, and how these fallacious arguments might be avoided by greater attention to a plausible theory of what distinguishes cognitive processes from non-cognitive processes. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


Ticich T.M.,Centenary College of Louisiana
Journal of Chemical Education | Year: 2011

A simple and direct method for measuring the absorption of carbon dioxide by two different substances is described. Lithium hydroxide has been used for decades to remove the gas from enclosed living spaces, such as spacecraft and submarines. The ratio of the mass of carbon dioxide absorbed to the mass of lithium hydroxide used obtained from this static method compares favorably with results in the literature that use a more complex constant-flow method. The method also works well for ethanolamine, another commonly used carbon dioxide absorber. The experiment for the general chemistry laboratory serves both quantitative and qualitative learning goals. Students compare stoichiometric calculations that assume a complete reaction with their experimental results to motivate use of the latter in predicting the amount of lithium hydroxide required for space missions. They use the ideal gas law to determine the mass of carbon dioxide absorbed. Their data allow a comparison of the performance characteristics of the two absorbers on the basis of their absorption capacity and the reversibility of their reactions with carbon dioxide. Students can also enhance their knowledge of descriptive chemistry by connecting qualitative observations during the reactions with species in the chemical equations.


Ciocchetti C.,Centenary College of Louisiana
Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics | Year: 2012

I argue that many philosophical arguments for veganism underestimate what is at stake for humans who give up eating animal products. By saying all that's at stake for humans is taste and characterizing taste in simplistic terms, they underestimate the reasonable resistance that arguments for veganism will meet. Taste, they believe, is trivial. Omnivores, particular those that I label "meaningful omnivores," disagree. They believe that eating meat provides a more meaningful meal, though just how this works proves elusive. Meaningful omnivores could find little in the philosophical literature to help them clarify and support their position until recently. A few philosophers have argued that our culinary practices involve something more significant than taste. I categorize these arguments into three kinds. They either argue that culinary practices are a form of artistic achievement, that our diet forms part of our identity, or that a specific diet facilitates honest engagement with the world. Each of these arguments connects some aspect of our culinary practices to living a meaningful life. I examine each argument to see if it can defend the meaningful omnivore's position. In the end, I conclude that it cannot. Nonetheless, this argument has significant implications for the animal welfare movement. Given the intense suffering caused by contemporary animal agriculture, concern for meaning is not sufficient to justify eating meat and often dairy. Concern for meaning does, however, require that we look for ways to preserve and extend culinary traditions while making them more humane. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

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