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News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Celmatix, a next-generation women’s health company, and 23andMe, the leading personal genetics company, today announced the launch of a new fertility research community. The goal of this initiative is to recruit 4,500 women, aged 18-45, who are trying to conceive or who have recently conceived. In addition to collecting genetic data from participants, the study will longitudinally track clinical, environmental, lifestyle, diet-associated, and fertility outcome metrics. This dataset will contribute to Celmatix’s larger research efforts, which are aimed at understanding factors that contribute to lifelong reproductive potential in a diverse population with the aim of identifying new genetic and other markers related to reproductive health. Women aged 18-45 who are trying to conceive or who have recently conceived can participate from home by consenting to provide a DNA sample (saliva), answering online surveys (one every two months for 18 months), and agreeing to share their de-identified, individual-level data with researchers. All study participants will receive 23andMe’s Personal Genome Service® at no cost. The study is currently open to U.S. residents only. “ Celmatix was founded with the goal of empowering women to be more proactive in managing their reproductive health through better data, including genetics,“ explained Celmatix founder and CEO, Dr. Piraye Yurttas Beim. “23andMe is the ideal collaborator to help recruit and manage this fertility research community given their shared vision for enabling people to be more proactive about their health through genetic insights and, also, the passion of their customer base for contributing to groundbreaking research. This ambitious initiative will bring us closer to enabling any woman, who may want to have a child one day, better understand how decisions about lifestyle, diet, and when to start building a family may impact her ability to have as many children as she wants given her underlying genetics. Many studies have explored these factors in isolation. This is the first study to bring them all together in one longitudinal dataset.” “ Many women struggle with fertility challenges, and yet there's still a limited understanding about what causes differences in fertility. For women who have faced difficulties when trying to conceive, there is the desire to understand why this is happening. And for women entering their child-bearing years, it can be frustrating to realize there are significant unknowns about one's fertility that can have big implications. Ultimately, this study has the capability to positively impact our understanding of fertility by leveraging big data, helping women understand their unique fertility, and empowering potential parents to make informed choices," explained Emily Drabant Conley, PhD, vice president of business development from 23andMe. Dr. Jorge E. Chavarro, MD, from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and a scientific advisor to the study, stated, “ The studies we have available right now to counsel women on their reproductive potential don’t include genetic-level insight and are generally smaller and less detailed than studies in other areas of health. A landmark study of this kind that simultaneously tracks the impact of environment, diet, lifestyle, and clinical metrics in the context of genetic background, on fertility potential and outcomes has never been conducted on this scale. Not only does this work have the potential to drive the next generation of personalized medicine products to impact clinical management, but it will also likely result in significant contributions to our fundamental understanding of the science of fertility.” To learn more about the study, please visit www.23andme.com/fertility. Celmatix is a next-generation women’s health company transforming reproductive health care through genomics and big data. Founded in 2009 and based in New York City, Celmatix is disrupting how women approach their lifelong fertility journey by empowering them with more personalized information. The company’s research-driven products include Fertilome®, the world’s first multigene panel test that reveals what a woman's DNA says about her reproductive health, and Polaris®, a real-time predictive analytics platform in use at leading fertility clinics across the U.S., which helps physicians optimize patient outcomes and improve the patient experience. For more information, visit www.celmatix.com. 23andMe, Inc. is the leading personal genetics company. Founded in 2006, the mission of the company is to help people access, understand and benefit from the human genome. 23andMe has over one million customers worldwide with over 80 percent consented to participate in research. 23andMe, Inc. is located in Mountain View, CA. More information is available at www.23andMe.com.


NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Celmatix, a next-generation women’s health company, today announced the Reproductive Atlas project, which is aimed at building an unprecedented knowledgebase about human reproductive potential. This database will incorporate biological annotations refined from the peer-reviewed literature with genomic data linked to data about lifestyle, diet, environment, and reproductive outcomes. The project aims to build the first population-scale dataset built for understanding reproductive health, incorporating a diverse cross-section of ethnic, geographic, and socioeconomic groups. “ Celmatix has been amassing genetic, biological, and clinical data related to fertility for almost a decade, however, most of it has been focused on individuals already affected by reproductive conditions and difficulties. Building the Reproductive Atlas knowledgebase will help us take this data to the next level. We want to ensure that over time, we can deliver the best products possible to a diverse group of women, earlier in their lives before reproductive conditions begin,” stated Celmatix Founder and CEO, Dr. Piraye Yurttas Beim, PhD. She continued, “ Many other industries, including oncology, have been able to rely on insights generated by academia. However, the field of women’s reproductive health and fertility is one of the lowest funded of all areas of medicine. This project was created to fill that gap by providing a better understanding of the impact of genomics, diet, lifestyle, and environment on all women’s fertility, regardless of known risk factors. We know that genomic data has predictive power, but is rarely destiny on its own. By collaborating with the top scientists, physicians, companies, and institutions who share this passion for progressing reproductive health, we will be able to create a rich knowledgebase for our field to better understand how these genetic and non-genetic factors intersect to impact reproductive health.” Celmatix will collaborate with a number of research centers and biotech leaders on this initiative. The first new study to launch through the Reproductive Atlas project is with the BioMe™ BioBank Program of the Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. “ We are thrilled to be participating in this study with Celmatix and to be a collaborator in the Reproductive Atlas project,” stated Amanda Merkelson, MPH, Managing Director of BioMe. “ One of the missions of BioMe is to accelerate initiatives like this through linking data that has been shared by patients in the Mount Sinai Health System who are passionate about progressing personalized medicine and genomics. This project, by focusing specifically on a condition as delicate and as pervasive as infertility and potentially impacting all women’s reproductive health, allows Mount Sinai to help further this mission.” Celmatix will be announcing additional collaborators as part of the Reproductive Atlas project in the coming months. Celmatix is a next-generation women’s health company transforming reproductive health care through genomics and big data. Founded in 2009 and based in New York City, Celmatix is disrupting how women approach their lifelong fertility journey by empowering them with more personalized information. The company’s research-driven products include Fertilome, the world’s first comprehensive genetic screen that reveals what a woman's DNA says about her reproductive health, and Polaris, a real-time predictive analytics platform in use at leading fertility clinics across the U.S., which helps physicians optimize patient outcomes and improve the patient experience. For more information, visit www.celmatix.com.


The invention generally relates to methods and devices for assessing risk of female infertility. In certain aspects, methods of the invention involve obtaining a sample, conducting an assay on at least one infertility-associated biomarker, and assessing risk to the patient of developing early-onset decrease in fertility based upon results of the assay.


The invention generally relates to methods for assessing whether a genetic region is associated with infertility.


The present invention generally relates to systems and methods for determining the probability of a pregnancy at a selected point in time. Systems and methods of the invention employ an algorithm that has been trained on a reference set of data from a plurality of women for whom at least one of fertility-associated phenotypic traits, fertility-associated medical interventions, or pregnancy outcomes are known, in which the algorithm accounts for any woman who ceases pregnancy attempts prior to reaching a live birth outcome.


The invention generally relates to methods and devices for assessing risk of female infertility. In certain aspects, methods of the invention involve obtaining a sample, conducting an assay on at least one infertility-associated biomarker, and assessing risk to the patient of developing early-onset decrease in fertility based upon results of the assay.


The invention generally relates to methods and devices for assessing infertility. In certain embodiments, methods of the invention involve conducting an assay to determine presence or absence of a mutation in a plurality of genes selected from Table 1, and assessing infertility based on results of the assay, wherein presence of a mutation in at least two of the genes from Table 1 is indicative of infertility.


The present invention generally relates to systems and methods for determining the probability of a pregnancy at a selected point in time. Systems and methods of the invention employ an algorithm that has been trained on a reference set of data from a plurality of women for whom at least one of fertility-associated phenotypic traits, fertility-associated medical interventions, or pregnancy outcomes are known, in which the algorithm accounts for any woman who ceases pregnancy attempts prior to reaching a live birth outcome.


Patent
Celmatix | Date: 2016-07-13

Methods of treating endometrial dysfunction are described including retrieval of endometrial cells including endometrial stem cells from a fertile donor and transplantation of endometrial cells or tissue into a host suffering from endometrial dysfunction. In certain embodiments, methods include genetic modification, tissue culturing, or cryopreservation of the endometrial cells prior to transplantation. In various aspects, endometrial cells are retrieved from an individual during peak fertility and banked for autologous transplantation at a later time.


Methods for assessing infertility and related pathologies and informing treatment type and timing thereof are provided. According to certain embodiments, methods of the invention include determining levels of one or more transcripts present in a sample obtained from a subject suspected of having endometriosis, identifying transcript levels that correspond to a regulation pattern specific to a time-point in a uterine cycle, and characterizing endometriosis of the subject based upon the identified transcript levels. The invention includes methods for assessing age-associated increase in aneuploidy rates based on FSH levels and IVF success rates based on obesity in PCOS patients.

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