Cell Therapy Center

Yongin, South Korea

Cell Therapy Center

Yongin, South Korea
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Antunes L.S.,Federal University of Fluminense | Kuchler E.C.,Federal University of Fluminense | Tannure P.N.,Veiga de Almeida University | Costa M.C.,Federal University of Rio de Janeiro | And 4 more authors.
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal | Year: 2013

Objective: To evaluate the association of the polymorphisms in the TGFB3 gene (rs2268626) and the BMP4 gene (rs17563) with nonsyndromic oral clefts. Design: A hospital-based case-control study was conducted with nonsyndromic oral clefts cases and unaffected controls. Cleft type and tooth agenesis data were collected by clinical examination and confirmed through medical records. Risk factors were obtained through a questionnaire. Genotyping of the selected polymorphisms for TGFB3 and BMP4 were carried out by real-time polymerase chain reaction using the Taqman assay method from a genomic DNA isolated from buccal epithelial cells of all individuals. Setting: The case group was ascertained through a public reference hospital of oral cleft rehabilitation in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The noncleft group consisted of unrelated subjects, with no history of oral cleft in the family, recruited at the Dental Clinic at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Participants: A total of 833 unrelated individuals (450 control individuals and 383 cases with nonsyndromic oral clefts) Results: No significant association in relation to genotype or allele distributions for TGFB3 polymorphism was found between oral cleft subgroups and the control group. For BMP4, there were significant differences in the genotype frequencies between the oral cleft and control groups (P=.0007). Regarding cleft type, there were statistically significant differences between the cleft lip and control groups (P =.00009). Conclusion: Our findings provide preliminary evidence suggesting that the risk of nonsyndromic oral clefts may be influenced by variation in the BMP4 gene. © Copyright 2013 American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association.


Park S.-H.,Cell Therapy Center | Park S.-H.,Ajou University | Park S.-H.,Tufts University | Park S.R.,Inha University | And 3 more authors.
Tissue Engineering - Part A | Year: 2011

Scaffold material is expected to play a crucial role in induction of chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for cartilage tissue engineering. Here we demonstrated the feasibility of a fibrin/hyaluronan (HA) composite hydrogel as a potent scaffold for support of chondrogenesis of rabbit MSCs (rMSCs). rMSCs were prepared in three-dimensional cultures of pellet, alginate layer, and fibrin/HA gel. Specimens in each group were cultured in chondrogenic defined media for 4 weeks in the absence or presence of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) treatment. Viability of rMSCs was somewhat reduced until 4 weeks, which was less significant in fibrin/HA gels than in the alginate layer (*p<0.05). The fibrin/HA group showed transient size reduction by about 35% at 1 week, but showed significantly higher mechanical strength than the alginate group. In safranin-O and alcian blue stains, accumulation of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) was observed clearly from 1 week, and homogenously in the entire area at 4 weeks in the fibrin/HA group. Of note, TGF-β1 treatment showed no additional effect on GAGs accumulation in the fibrin/HA group. The alginate and pellet groups, however, showed much lower levels of GAGs accumulation only in the presence of TGF-β1. Biochemical assays for GAGs and collagen, and expression of chondrogenic markers also showed much better results in the fibrin/HA group, even without TGF-β treatment than the other groups. These results demonstrated that fibrin/HA composite gel efficiently promoted chondrogenic differentiation of rMSCs, even without TGF-β treatment, and that it could be a useful tool for use in cartilage tissue engineering. © 2011 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Fadilah S.A.W.,Cell Therapy Center | Mohd-Razif M.I.,Cell Therapy Center | Seery Z.A.Z.,Cell Therapy Center | Nor-Rafeah T.,Cell Therapy Center | And 2 more authors.
Transfusion and Apheresis Science | Year: 2013

We examined the donor factors that may affect the yield of peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilized from healthy donors. Pre-apheresis PB-CD34+ cell count was the only factor that correlated with PBSC yield. Leukocyte count (LC) and monocyte count (MC) correlated with PB-CD34+ cell. Male gender and PB-CD34+ cell count of at least 87.1/μL and 69.8/μL on day-4 and -5 of G-CSF were associated with the ability to harvest at least 5×106/kg CD34+ cells after one apheresis. We concluded that gender and PB-CD34+ cell count are important predictors of PBSC yield. LC and MC may serve as surrogate markers for estimating the PB-CD34+ cell count. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Cui J.H.,Ajou University | Cui J.H.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Park S.R.,Inha University | Choi B.H.,Inha University | And 2 more authors.
Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine | Year: 2010

This study investigated the effect of low intensity ultrasound (LIUS) stimulation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro on the repair of cartilage defect after implantation of the construct in vivo. Rabbit MSCs were cultured in the polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffold and preconditioned with (MSCs/US+) or without (MSCs/US-) LIUS stimulation during the chondrogenic differentiation for 1 week in vitro. The LIUS stimulation was carried out at the intensity of 200 mW/Cm2 every day for 20 min over a week. The constructs were implanted into the cartilage defects created in the rabbit femoral trochlea. The defect only was used as a negative control and rabbit chondrocytes seeded in PGA was used as a positive control, respectively. The repair of cartilage defect was examined at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after implantation, respectively. The gross observation showed that the articular cartilage defects were filled with the repaired tissue in all groups. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed, however, more intensive and widespread expression of proteoglycans and type II collagen in the MSCs/US+ group than in the MSCs/US- group. Fibrous tissues were observed mainly in the defect only group. The chondrocytes groups showed efficient repair of the defect by hyaline cartilage. In conclusion, this study suggested that LIUS preconditioning of MSCs in vitro could be an effective method to promote chondrogenesis of MSCs and repair of cartilage defect in vivo.


Lim O.,MOGAM Biotechnology Institute | Jung M.Y.,MOGAM Biotechnology Institute | Hwang Y.K.,Cell Therapy Center | Shin E.-C.,KAIST
Frontiers in Immunology | Year: 2015

Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that are capable of eliminating tumor cells and are therefore used for cancer therapy. Although many early investigators used autologous NK cells, including lymphokine-activated killer cells, the clinical efficacies were not satisfactory. Meanwhile, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation revealed the antitumor effect of allogeneic NK cells, and HLA-haploidentical, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor ligand-mismatched allogeneic NK cells are currently used for many protocols requiring NK cells. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors have been recently used in cancer therapy. The use of allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors allows the selection of donor NK cells with higher flexibility and to prepare expanded, cryopreserved NK cells for instant administration without delay for ex vivo expansion. In cancer therapy with allogeneic NK cells, optimal matching of donors and recipients is important to maximize the efficacy of the therapy. In this review, we summarize the present state of allogeneic NK cell therapy and its future directions. © 2015 Lim, Jung, Hwang and Shin.


Choi B.H.,Inha University | Choi K.-H.,Ajou University | Choi K.-H.,Cell Therapy Center | Lee H.S.,Inje University | And 6 more authors.
Biomaterials | Year: 2014

In this study, the chondrocyte-derived extracellular matrix (CECM) was evaluated for its activity to inhibit vessel invasion invitro and invivo. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and rabbit chondrocytes were plated on a bio-membrane made of CECM or human amniotic membrane (HAM). The adhesion, proliferation, and tube formation activity of HUVECs and chondrocytes were examined. The CECM and HAM powders were then mixed individually in Matrigel and injected subcutaneously into nude mice to examine vessel invasion invivo after 1 week. Finally, a rabbit model of corneal neovascularization (NV) was induced by 3-point sutures in the upper cornea, and CECM and HAM membranes were implanted onto the corneal surface at day 5 after suture injury. The rabbits were sacrificed at 7 days after transplantation and the histopathological analysis was performed. The adhesion and proliferation of HUVECs were more efficient on the HAM than on the CECM membrane. However, chondrocytes on each membrane showed an opposite result being more efficient on the CECM membrane. The vessel invasion invivo also occurred more deeply and intensively in Matrigel containing HAM than in the one containing CECM. In the rabbit NV model, CECM efficiently inhibited the neovessels formation and histological remodeling in the injured cornea. In summary, our findings suggest that CECM, an integral cartilage ECM composite, shows an inhibitory effect on vessel invasion both invitro and invivo, and could be a useful tool in a variety of biological and therapeutic applications including the prevention of neovascularization after cornea injury. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | KAIST, MOGAM Biotechnology Institute and Cell Therapy Center
Type: | Journal: Frontiers in immunology | Year: 2015

Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that are capable of eliminating tumor cells and are therefore used for cancer therapy. Although many early investigators used autologous NK cells, including lymphokine-activated killer cells, the clinical efficacies were not satisfactory. Meanwhile, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation revealed the antitumor effect of allogeneic NK cells, and HLA-haploidentical, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor ligand-mismatched allogeneic NK cells are currently used for many protocols requiring NK cells. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors have been recently used in cancer therapy. The use of allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors allows the selection of donor NK cells with higher flexibility and to prepare expanded, cryopreserved NK cells for instant administration without delay for ex vivo expansion. In cancer therapy with allogeneic NK cells, optimal matching of donors and recipients is important to maximize the efficacy of the therapy. In this review, we summarize the present state of allogeneic NK cell therapy and its future directions.


You D.,University of Ulsan | Jang M.J.,Cell Therapy Center | Kim B.H.,University of Ulsan | Song G.,University of Ulsan | And 5 more authors.
Stem Cells Translational Medicine | Year: 2015

The abilities of intracavernous injection of autologous stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and adiposederived stem cells (ADSCs) to facilitate recovery of erectile function in a rat model of cavernous nerve (CN) injury were compared. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham and control groups (intracavernous injection of phosphate-buffered saline), SVF group (intracavernous injection of SVF), and ADSC group (intracavernous injection of ADSCs). Rats in the latter three groups underwent bilateral CN injury prior to injection. The evaluation of erectile function and histomorphometric studies were performed 4 weeks after injection. The ratio of maximal intracavernous pressure to mean arterial pressure was significantly lower in the control group than in the sham group (0.18 vs. 0.56, p <.001). Intracavernous injection of SVF (0.36, p =.035) significantly improved erectile function compared with that in the control group, whereas the ADSC group (0.35, p =.052) showed marginally significant improvement. The smooth muscle/collagen ratio, smooth muscle content, number of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase-positive nerve fibers, and expression of von Willebrand factor were significantly higher in the SVF and ADSC groups than in the control group. Expression of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase was significantly increased in the SVF group. The increases in the smooth muscle/collagen ratio and von Willebrand factor expression were larger in the SVF group than in the ADSC group. Intracavernous injection of SVF or ADSCs was equally effective in recovering penile erection in a rat model of CN injury. © AlphaMed Press.


Choi K.-H.,Ajou University | Choi K.-H.,Cell Therapy Center | Song B.R.,Ajou University | Choi B.H.,Inha University | And 4 more authors.
Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine | Year: 2012

Loss of chondrogenic phenotypes of tissue engineered cartilage using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vivo are thought to be influenced by environmental factors like vessel invasion in particular. This study investigated effect of a chondrocyte-derived extracellular matrix (CD-ECM) scaffold on the hypertrophic changes and vessel invasion into tissue engineered cartilage using rabbit MSCs in comparison with a synthetic polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffold. Rabbit MSCs in CD-ECM or PGA scaffold were differentiated for 1 week in vitro and implanted in the back of nude mice for 6 weeks in vivo. Gross observation showed red stains, indicative of vessel invasion, increased along with the loss of chondrogenic phenotype in safranin-O stains, which was more prominent in the PGA constructs. The area showing loss of chondrogenic phenotypes in safranin-O stain was correlated well with the mineralized area in the von kossa stain and the area with vessel-like structures in the gomori aldehyde fuchsin stain at 6 weeks in terms of their size and distribution. Also, vessel invasion took place more deeply and intensively into the constructs, in accordance with the expression of angiogenic markers (CD31, VEGF-A and HIF-1a) and a macrophage marker (CD68). This phenomenon progressed much more rapidly in the PGA constructs than in the CDECM constructs, and correlated well with the loss of chondrogenic phenotypes. In conclusion, this study showed that tissue engineered cartilage using the CD-ECM scaffold maintained better chondrogenic phenotypes in vivo and showed lower levels of hypertrophic changes and vessel invasion. © Springer, Part of Springer Science+Business Media.


PubMed | Cell Therapy Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Transfusion and apheresis science : official journal of the World Apheresis Association : official journal of the European Society for Haemapheresis | Year: 2013

We examined the donor factors that may affect the yield of peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilized from healthy donors. Pre-apheresis PB-CD34(+) cell count was the only factor that correlated with PBSC yield. Leukocyte count (LC) and monocyte count (MC) correlated with PB-CD34(+) cell. Male gender and PB-CD34(+) cell count of at least 87.1/L and 69.8/L on day-4 and -5 of G-CSF were associated with the ability to harvest at least 510(6)/kg CD34(+) cells after one apheresis. We concluded that gender and PB-CD34(+) cell count are important predictors of PBSC yield. LC and MC may serve as surrogate markers for estimating the PB-CD34(+) cell count.

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