Cell Imaging Platform of Normandy PRIMACEN

France

Cell Imaging Platform of Normandy PRIMACEN

France
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Basille-Dugay M.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Basille-Dugay M.,Institut Universitaire de France | Basille-Dugay M.,University of Rouen | Hamza M.M.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | And 19 more authors.
Experimental Neurology | Year: 2013

The development of the central nervous system requires an appropriate micro-environment that is conditioned by a combination of various extracellular components. Most of the known signaling factors, such as neurotransmitters or neuropeptides, are soluble and diffuse into the extracellular matrix. However, other secreted molecules like proteoglycans or glycosaminoglycans anchor in the extracellular matrix to influence cerebral ontogenesis. As such, pleiotrophin (PTN), which binds the proteoglycans syndecan-3 (SDC3) and protein tyrosine phosphatase zeta (PTPζ), has been described as a pro-migratory and a pro-differentiating secreted cytokine on cortical neurons. In rat cerebellum, PTN is highly expressed during the first postnatal week, suggesting that this cytokine could participate to the development of the cerebellar cortex. According to this hypothesis, our spatio-temporal cartography of PTN, PTPζ and SDC3 indicated that, in mouse, the PTNergic system was present in the cerebellum at least from the first postnatal day (P0). Until P12, PTN was mainly expressed by granule cell precursors and located in the extracellular matrix, while SDC3 was expressed by Purkinje cells, Golgi cells and granule cell precursors, and PTPζ was present on Purkinje cells and Bergmann fibers. In vitro studies confirmed the presence of SDC3 on immature granule cells and demonstrated that PTN could stimulate directly their velocity in culture. In contrast, subarachnoidal injection of PTN in the cerebellum significantly reduced the rate of migration of granule cells, exacerbated their apoptosis and induced an atrophy of the Purkinje cell dendritic tree. Since differentiated granule cells did not express SDC3 or PTPζ, the PTN effect observed on migration and apoptosis may be indirectly mediated by Purkinje and/or Bergmann cells. From P21 to adulthood, the distribution of PTN, SDC3 and PTPζ changed and their expression dramatically decreased even if they were still detectable. PTN and SDC3 immunolabeling was restricted around Purkinje cell bodies and Golgi cells, whereas PTPζ was located around interneurons. These data suggested that, in the cerebellum of adult mice, PTN participates to the perineuronal nets that control neuronal plasticity. To conclude, the present work represents the first spatio-temporal characterization of the PTNergic system in the mouse cerebellum and indicates that PTN may contribute to cerebellum ontogenesis during the postnatal development as well as to neuronal plasticity at adulthood. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Neveu C.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Neveu C.,CNRS Organic Chemistry, Bioorganic Chemistry: Reactivity and Analysis | Dulin F.,CNRS Organic Chemistry, Bioorganic Chemistry: Reactivity and Analysis | Dulin F.,Normandie University | And 25 more authors.
British Journal of Pharmacology | Year: 2014

Background and Purpose The neuropeptide 26RFa and its cognate receptor GPR103 are involved in the control of food intake and bone mineralization. Here, we have tested, experimentally, the predicted ligand-receptor interactions by site-directed mutagenesis of GPR103 and designed point-substituted 26RFa analogues. Experimental Approach Using the X-ray structure of the β2-adrenoceptor, a 3-D molecular model of GPR103 has been built. The bioactive C-terminal octapeptide 26RFa(19-26), KGGFSFRF-NH2, was docked in this GPR103 model and the ligand-receptor complex was submitted to energy minimization. Key Results In the most stable complex, the Phe-Arg-Phe-NH2 part was oriented inside the receptor cavity, whereas the N-terminal Lys residue remained outside. A strong intermolecular interaction was predicted between the Arg25 residue of 26RFa and the Gln125 residue located in the third transmembrane helix of GPR103. To confirm this interaction experimentally, we tested the ability of 26RFa and Arg-modified 26RFa analogues to activate the wild-type and the Q125A mutant receptors transiently expressed in CHO cells. 26RFa (10-6 M) enhanced [Ca2+]i in wild-type GPR103-transfected cells, but failed to increase [Ca2+]i in Q125A mutant receptor-expressing cells. Moreover, asymmetric dimethylation of the side chain of arginine led to a 26RFa analogue, [ADMA25]26RFa(20-26), that was unable to activate the wild-type GPR103, but antagonized 26RFa-evoked [Ca2+]i increase. Conclusion and Implications Altogether, these data provide strong evidence for a functional interaction between the Arg25 residue of 26RFa and the Gln125 residue of GPR103 upon ligand-receptor activation, which can be exploited for the rational design of potent GPR103 agonists and antagonists. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.


Neveu C.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Dulin F.,University of Caen Lower Normandy | Lefranc B.,Cell Imaging Platform of Normandy PRIMACEN | Galas L.,Cell Imaging Platform of Normandy PRIMACEN | And 11 more authors.
British Journal of Pharmacology | Year: 2014

Background and Purpose: The neuropeptide 26RFa and its cognate receptor GPR103 are involved in the control of food intake and bone mineralization. Here, we have tested, experimentally, the predicted ligand-receptor interactions by site-directed mutagenesis of GPR103 and designed point-substituted 26RFa analogues. Experimental Approach: Using the X-ray structure of the β2-adrenoceptor, a 3-D molecular model of GPR103 has been built. The bioactive C-terminal octapeptide 26RFa(19-26), KGGFSFRF-NH2, was docked in this GPR103 model and the ligand-receptor complex was submitted to energy minimization. Key Results: In the most stable complex, the Phe-Arg-Phe-NH2 part was oriented inside the receptor cavity, whereas the N-terminal Lys residue remained outside. A strong intermolecular interaction was predicted between the Arg25 residue of 26RFa and the Gln125 residue located in the third transmembrane helix of GPR103. To confirm this interaction experimentally, we tested the ability of 26RFa and Arg-modified 26RFa analogues to activate the wild-type and the Q125A mutant receptors transiently expressed in CHO cells. 26RFa (10-6M) enhanced [Ca2+]i in wild-type GPR103-transfected cells, but failed to increase [Ca2+]i in Q125A mutant receptor-expressing cells. Moreover, asymmetric dimethylation of the side chain of arginine led to a 26RFa analogue, [ADMA25]26RFa(20-26), that was unable to activate the wild-type GPR103, but antagonized 26RFa-evoked [Ca2+]i increase. Conclusion and Implications: Altogether, these data provide strong evidence for a functional interaction between the Arg25 residue of 26RFa and the Gln125 residue of GPR103 upon ligand-receptor activation, which can be exploited for the rational design of potent GPR103 agonists and antagonists. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.


Langlois L.,University of Rouen | Meleine M.,University of Rouen | Ouelaa W.,University of Rouen | Caremel R.,University of Rouen | And 7 more authors.
Neurogastroenterology and Motility | Year: 2015

Background: Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is an alternative surgical treatment of refractory urge incontinence and/or fecal incontinence. Despite its clinical efficacy, the mechanisms of action of SNS remain poorly understood. The aim of this experimental study was to evaluate the effect of SNS on visceral mechanosensitivity in rats. Methods: Anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with SNS or sham stimulation. SNS was performed by implanting an electrode close to the sacral nerve root S1. Rats were administered either a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist (naloxone) or a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (L-NAME). Colonic mechanosensitivity was evaluated using the variation of arterial blood pressure as a spino-bulbar reflex in response to graded isobaric colorectal distension (CRD). C-fos immunoreactive neurons were quantified in spinal and supraspinal sites. μ-opioid receptor (MOR) internalization was counted in the sacral spinal cord with sham or effective SNS in response to CRD. Key Results: SNS reduced visceral mechanosensitivity in response to CRD. This effect was reversed by intrathecal and intraveinous naloxone administration. In both models, CRD induced increased c-fos immunoreactivity in the dorsal horn neurons of the sacral spinal cord and supraspinal areas. This increase was prevented by SNS. MOR internalization was significantly higher in stimulated group. Conclusions & Inferences: SNS impacts on visceral mechanosensitivity by decreasing the spino-bulbar reflex in response to CRD. Spinal opioid receptors are likely involved in this effect. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


PubMed | Cell Imaging Platform of Normandy PRIMACEN and University of Rouen
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Neurogastroenterology and motility : the official journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society | Year: 2015

Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is an alternative surgical treatment of refractory urge incontinence and/or fecal incontinence. Despite its clinical efficacy, the mechanisms of action of SNS remain poorly understood. The aim of this experimental study was to evaluate the effect of SNS on visceral mechanosensitivity in rats.Anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with SNS or sham stimulation. SNS was performed by implanting an electrode close to the sacral nerve root S1. Rats were administered either a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist (naloxone) or a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (L-NAME). Colonic mechanosensitivity was evaluated using the variation of arterial blood pressure as a spino-bulbar reflex in response to graded isobaric colorectal distension (CRD). C-fos immunoreactive neurons were quantified in spinal and supraspinal sites. -opioid receptor (MOR) internalization was counted in the sacral spinal cord with sham or effective SNS in response to CRD.SNS reduced visceral mechanosensitivity in response to CRD. This effect was reversed by intrathecal and intraveinous naloxone administration. In both models, CRD induced increased c-fos immunoreactivity in the dorsal horn neurons of the sacral spinal cord and supraspinal areas. This increase was prevented by SNS. MOR internalization was significantly higher in stimulated group.SNS impacts on visceral mechanosensitivity by decreasing the spino-bulbar reflex in response to CRD. Spinal opioid receptors are likely involved in this effect.

Loading Cell Imaging Platform of Normandy PRIMACEN collaborators
Loading Cell Imaging Platform of Normandy PRIMACEN collaborators