Cell and Molecular Biology of Plants

Saidí / Zaidín, Spain

Cell and Molecular Biology of Plants

Saidí / Zaidín, Spain
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Sanz-Fernandez M.,Cell and Molecular Biology of Plants | Rodriguez-Serrano M.,Cell and Molecular Biology of Plants | Sevilla-Perea A.,IACT UGR_CSIC | Pena L.,University of Buenos Aires | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Hazardous Materials | Year: 2017

Emissions of heavy metals have risen over the past 200 years and significantly exceed those from natural sources. Phytoremediation strategies may be able to recover soil productivity in self-sustaining ecosystems; however, our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in plant heavy-metal perception and signalling is scarce. The aim of this study was to assemble a “molecular tool box” of genes useful for phytoremediation. To identify mutants with different heavy-metal-tolerance, we first selected a medium from mixtures containing three metals based on their presence in two Spanish mining areas and then screened about 7000 lines of Arabidopsis T-DNA mutants and found 74 lines more resistant and 56 more susceptible than the wild type (WT). Classification of the genes showed that they were mainly linked to transport, protein modification and signalling, with RNA metabolism being the most representative category in the resistant phenotypes and protein metabolism in the sensitive ones. We have characterized one resistant mutant, Athpp9 and one sensitive, Atala4. These mutants showed differences in growth and metal translocation. Additionally, we found that these mutants keep their phenotype in amended former soils, suggesting that these genes may be useful for phytoremediation and the recovery of contaminated soils. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


Zienkiewicz A.,Cell and Molecular Biology of Plants | Zienkiewicz A.,Nicolaus Copernicus University | Zienkiewicz K.,Cell and Molecular Biology of Plants | Zienkiewicz K.,Nicolaus Copernicus University | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Experimental Botany | Year: 2014

The major seed storage reserves in oilseeds are accumulated in protein bodies and oil bodies, and serve as an energy, carbon, and nitrogen source during germination. Here, the spatio-temporal relationships between protein bodies and several key enzymes (phospholipase A, lipase, and lipoxygenase) involved in storage lipid mobilization in cotyledon cells was analysed during in vitro seed germination. Enzyme activities were assayed in-gel and their cellular localization were determined using microscopy techniques. At seed maturity, phospholipase A and triacylglycerol lipase activities were found exclusively in protein bodies. However, after seed imbibition, these activities were shifted to the cytoplasm and the surface of the oil bodies. The activity of neutral lipases was detected by using -naphthyl palmitate and it was associated mainly with protein bodies during the whole course of germination. This pattern of distribution was highly similar to the localization of neutral lipids, which progressively appeared in protein bodies. Lipoxygenase activity was found in both the protein bodies and on the surface of the oil bodies during the initial phase of seed germination. The association of lipoxygenase with oil bodies was temporally correlated with the appearance of phospholipase A and lipase activities on the surface of oil bodies. It is concluded that protein bodies not only serve as simple storage structures, but are also dynamic and multifunctional organelles directly involved in storage lipid mobilization during olive seed germination. © 2013 The Author.

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