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Lee H.,Kyungpook National University | Bae J.-S.,Kyungpook National University | Bae J.-S.,Cell and Matrix Research Institute | Jin H.K.,Kyungpook National University
Molecules and Cells | Year: 2015

Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA), which encodes the lysosomal enzyme glucosylceramidase (GCase). Deficiency in GCase leads to characteristic visceral pathology and lethal neurological manifestations in some patients. Investigations into neurogenesis have suggested that neurodegenerative disorders, such as GD, could be overcome or at least ameliorated by the generation of new neurons. Bone marrowderived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are potential candidates for use in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders because of their ability to promote neurogenesis. Our objective was to examine the mechanism of neurogenesis by BM-MSCs in GD. We found that neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from a neuronopathic GD model exhibited decreased ability for self-renewal and neuronal differentiation. Co-culture of GBA-deficient NSCs with BM-MSCs resulted in an enhanced capacity for self-renewal, and an increased ability for differentiation into neurons or oligodendrocytes. Enhanced proliferation and neuronal differentiation of GBA-deficient NSCs was associated with elevated release of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) from BM-MSCs. Our findings suggest that soluble M-CSF derived from BM-MSCs can modulate GBA-deficient NSCs, resulting in their improved proliferation and neuronal differentiation. © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology. All rights reserved. Source


Lee S.-W.,Kyungpook National University | Lee Y.L.,Kyungpook National University | Lee Y.J.,Kyungpook National University | Park S.-Y.,Dongguk University | And 5 more authors.
Cancer Letters | Year: 2010

The use of a novel therapeutic vector containing HSV1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and a short hairpin RNA for the MDR1 gene (shMDR) was proposed previously. We investigated the antitumor effects in an in vivo mouse model of colon cancer and assessed treatment response by serial non-invasive imaging. shMDR-TK expressing (MTKG) tumors for the dual therapy group mice with ganciclovir and doxorubicin showed a decrease in size, while tumors in the single therapy group mice showed a moderate increase (p < 0.05). The 131I-5-iodo-2′-fluoro-2′deoxy-1-β-d-arabinofuranosyluracil (FIAU) uptake ratio of MTKG-to-parent HCT-15 tumors decreased as treatment progressed for single or dual therapy group mice, while that of the control group mice increased gradually. This study demonstrates the enhanced antitumor effects with combination gene therapy compared with a single therapeutic approach, and provides the potential of therapeutic response monitoring. © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Lee H.,Kyungpook National University | Lee H.,Cell and Matrix Research Institute | Lee J.K.,Kyungpook National University | Lee J.K.,Cell and Matrix Research Institute | And 18 more authors.
Nature Communications | Year: 2014

Sphingosine is a major storage compound in Niemann-Pick type C disease (NP-C), although the pathological role(s) of this accumulation have not been fully characterized. Here we found that sphingosine kinase (SphK) activity is reduced in NP-C patient fibroblasts and NP-C mouse Purkinje neurons (PNs) due to defective vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. Sphingosine accumulation due to inactivation of VEGF/SphK pathway led to PNs loss via inhibition of autophagosome-lysosome fusion in NP-C mice. VEGF activates SphK by binding to VEGFR2, resulting in decreased sphingosine storage as well as improved PNs survival and clinical outcomes in NP-C cells and mice. We also show that induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived human NP-C neurons are generated and the abnormalities caused by VEGF/SphK inactivity in these cells are corrected by replenishment of VEGF. Overall, these results reveal a pathogenic mechanism in NP-C neurons where defective SphK activity is due to impaired VEGF levels. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Source


Lee H.,Stem Cell Neuroplasticity Research Group | Lee H.,Cell and Matrix Research Institute | Kang J.E.,Stem Cell Neuroplasticity Research Group | Kang J.E.,Cell and Matrix Research Institute | And 7 more authors.
Human Gene Therapy | Year: 2013

Niemann-Pick type C (NP-C) disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized neuropathologically by ballooned neurons distended with lipid storage and widespread neuronal loss. Neural stem cells (NSC) derived from NP-C disease models have decreased ability for self-renewal and neuronal differentiation. Investigation of neurogenesis in the adult brain has suggested that NP-C disease can be overcome, or at least ameliorated, by the generation of new neurons. Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are regarded as potential candidates for use in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders because of their ability to promote neurogenesis. The underlying mechanisms of BM-MSC-induced promotion of neurogenesis, however, have not been resolved. The aim of the present study was to examine the mechanism of neurogenesis by BM-MSCs in NP-C disease. Coculture of embryonic NSCs from NP-C mice that exhibit impaired ability for self-renewal and decreased rates of neuronal differentiation with BM-MSCs resulted in an enhanced capacity for self-renewal and an increased ability for differentiation into neurons or oligodendrocytes. In addition, results of in vivo studies have demonstrated that transplantation of intracerebral BM-MSCs resulted in stimulated proliferation and neuronal differentiation of NSCs within the subventricular zone. Of particular interest, enhanced proliferation and neuronal differentiation of endogenous NP-C mouse NSCs showed an association with elevated release of the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) from BM-MSCs. These effects suggest that soluble CCL2 derived from BM-MSCs can modulate endogenous NP-C NSCs, resulting in their improved proliferation and neuronal differentiation in mice. © Copyright 2013, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2013. Source


Kim B.S.,Kyungpook National University | Seo H.,Kyungpook National University | Kim H.-J.,Kyungpook National University | Bae S.M.,Cell and Matrix Research Institute | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Medicinal Food | Year: 2015

Decursin, a bioactive phytochemical isolated from Angelica gigas Nakai (danggwi), has shown preclinical anticancer efficacy in various cancer models. However, the antitumor effect of decursin in melanoma models remains undefined. The antitumor activities of decursin were investigated in B16F10 cells in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we show that treatment with decursin inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in B16F10 cells, but not in normal cells. Decursin also induced apoptosis in B16F10 cells, as determined by annexin V-staining assay and transferase-mediated nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining assay. Decursin increased the phosphorylation of p38 as well as the expression of Bax while decreasing the phosphorylation of extracellular signaling-regulated kinase (ERK) and the expression of Bcl-2 in B16F10 cells. Moreover, decursin activated caspase-3 in B16F10 cells and xenograft tumor tissue. Together, these findings support further investigations into the potential use of decursin in the treatment of melanoma cells. © Copyright 2015, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. and Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition. Source

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