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Los Angeles, CA, United States

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SALEM, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Commonwealth Diagnostics International, Inc. (CDI), announced today findings from three studies presented at the Digestive Disease Week (DDW) Annual Meeting 2017 in Chicago, IL. Given the prevalence of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), there is an interest in gaining a better understanding of the disease and available diagnostic testing methods. Through the three studies shared at DDW, CDI provided new insights linking IBSchekTM to issues related to IBS-D (Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Diarrhea) testing methods. IBS, a common gastrointestinal disorder accompanied by symptoms such as bloating, intermittent abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, and constipation, is often difficult for healthcare providers to diagnose. Frequently, IBS is diagnosed by a process of exclusion, meaning patients are diagnosed after numerous tests, and after excluding all other conditions. These testing methods can be invasive, expensive, and time-consuming. IBSchek is considered to be the only reliable blood test for the diagnosis of IBS-D and is predictive of an IBS-D diagnosis based on the presence of 2 antibodies – anti-cytolethal distending toxin B (CdtB) and anti-vinculin. IBSchek allows healthcare providers to quickly and confidently diagnose IBS-D, as these biomarkers can accurately differentiate IBS from other causes of diarrhea without excessive investigation. “DDW is the world’s largest gathering of gastroenterologists, and we are pleased to present new scientific data at this meeting that will contribute to a better understanding of IBS-D,” said Craig S. Strasnick, president and CEO at CDI. “Through the three studies showcased at DDW, we hope to generate dialogue between patients, healthcare providers, and payers about the value of leveraging less invasive testing methods that can quickly and confidently diagnose this common disease.” Studies presented at DDW include these by Dr. Mark Pimentel, of Cedars-Sinai: Cytolethal distending toxin B (CdtB) exposure alone is sufficient to precipitate autoimmunity and changes to the small intestinal microbiome in a rat model of post-infectious IBS: Results from this study support that CdtB is an important factor in the development of functional changes after gastroenteritis. Many cases of IBS begin after a bout of acute gastroenteritis. This study suggests that the presence of two specific antibodies (CdtB and anti-vinculin) can be highly predictive of an IBS-D diagnosis, and these biomarkers can accurately differentiate IBS from other causes of diarrhea. 1 Measurement of hydrogen sulfide (H S) during breath testing correlates to patient symptoms: This study provided evidence that H S appears to be important in predicting clinical symptoms of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), particularly diarrhea and fatigue. Additionally, increased levels of H S may correlate to increased severity of symptoms.2 An additional study, also done in partnership with Cedars-Sinai, will be presented to explore the cost-effectiveness of IBS-D testing: The Cost-Effectiveness of Laboratory Biomarkers for Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Diarrhea: A Framework for Payers: This study helped determine the cost savings—both direct and indirect—to the patient and healthcare system from receiving a faster IBS-D diagnosis. Additionally, the study provides a framework for payers to evaluate the return on investment of implementing IBS-D biomarkers of varying accuracy and cost.3 “As a gastroenterologist, it is helpful to evaluate this diverse data, as it provides insights into a variety of issues related to IBS-D testing,” said Mark Pimentel, MD, principal investigator and Executive Director, MAST Program (Medically Associated Science and Technology), Cedars-Sinai. “In particular, I am intrigued by the studies that explored various biomarkers and how these biomarkers specifically affect symptoms and can point to underlying IBS-D disease. The ability to effectively and quickly diagnose an IBS-D patient is essential, as we know this is a disease that can significantly affect a patient’s quality of life.” Brennan Spiegel, MD, MSHS, Director, Health Services Research in Academic Affairs and Clinical Transformation at Cedars-Sinai, believes the new testing is a great benefit to patients, and noted, “Although IBS is the most common disease managed by gastroenterologists, it can still be surprisingly difficult to diagnose because other conditions can present with the same symptoms. With the increasing development of biomarkers to help clinicians distinguish IBS from other conditions, it’s important to measure the cost-effectiveness of these new blood tests.” IBSchek is marketed internationally by CDI. Cedars-Sinai has entered into an exclusive license agreement with CDI for several patent applications covering the blood tests to detect both anti-CdtB and anti-vinculin antibodies in the diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), developed by Mark Pimentel, MD. IBSchek is a simple ELISA-based blood test that is highly predictive of an IBS-D diagnosis based on the presence of 2 antibodies – anti-CdtB and anti-vinculin. IBSchek is considered to be the only quick and reliable blood test for the diagnosis of IBS-D. With IBSchek, IBS-D may no longer be a diagnosis of exclusion and healthcare providers can now confidently diagnose certain mechanisms of IBS without excessive investigation. Additional information about IBSchek can be found at www.CommDx.com. IBS is a functional gastrointestinal disorder that is associated with bloating, chronic abdominal pain and cramping, and changes in bowel frequency and form. Diarrhea and constipation are common symptoms associated with IBS, and the exact cause is unknown.4 Treatments are available to help manage the symptoms of IBS4, but there is no known cure. It is estimated that IBS affects between 25 and 45 million people in the United States5 and is the most commonly diagnosed functional GI disorder. Commonwealth Diagnostics International, Inc. is an international diagnostic service provider specializing in cutting-edge diagnostic products that assist physicians and patients with the diagnosis of some of the common sources of digestive distress and functional gastrointestinal disorders. CDI’s current diagnostic portfolio (excluding R&D) specializes in customized Gas Chromatography, ELISA, and Isotope-Ratio Mass Spectrometry solutions. CDI partners internationally with some of the most reputable and preeminent diagnostic service providers, medical and health technology companies, life sciences and biotechnology organizations, academic and research institutions, and public health consortiums in the world. The company is headquartered in Salem, MA, and additional company information can be found at www.CommDx.com. Cedars-Sinai is a leader in providing high-quality healthcare encompassing primary care, specialized medicine and research. Since 1902, Cedars-Sinai has evolved to meet the needs of one of the most diverse regions in the nation, setting standards in quality and innovative patient care, research, teaching and community service. Today, Cedars-Sinai is known for its national leadership in transforming healthcare for the benefit of patients. Cedars-Sinai impacts the future of healthcare by developing new approaches to treatment and educating tomorrow’s health professionals. Additionally, Cedars-Sinai demonstrates a commitment to the community through programs that improve the health of its most vulnerable residents.


FDA Designates Teprotumumab as a "Breakthrough Therapy" Combatting Thyroid Eye Disease; New England Journal of Medicine Publishes Paper on the Game-Changing Drug Co-Authored By Doctors Smith and Douglas ANN ARBOR, MI and LOS ANGELES, CA / ACCESSWIRE / May 16, 2017 / The University of Michigan's Dr. Terry J. Smith and Beverly Hills, California surgeon Dr. Raymond Douglas - two prominent physicians specializing in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy, also known as Graves' eye disease - have unveiled a dramatic new non-surgical treatment for Thyroid Eye Disease, one of the more serious symptoms of Graves' disease. Proof of the treatment's efficacy resulted from a 24 week treatment trial. The rationale for using Teprotumumab in thyroid eye disease was developed in Dr. Smith's laboratory over 20 years ago. The drug was repurposed from its initial target, cancer. It now has been designated by the FDA as a "breakthrough" therapy for Thyroid Eye Disease. This designation is reserved for drugs that are destined to radically change a specific field of medicine. A paper describing results of the clinical trial was published this month by the New England Journal of Medicine. A second trial is scheduled to begin enrolling participants later this Spring to further examine Teprotumumab's effectiveness. Several medical centers in the US and Europe will participate, including Cedars Sinai in Los Angeles, CA, La Peer Health Center in Beverly Hills, CA, and the University of Michigan's Kellogg Eye Center in Ann Arbor, MI. Identification of Teprotumumab as a therapy for Thyroid Eye Disease represents an approach that will potentially replace surgery as a treatment for this condition. Teprotumumab is a monoclonal antibody that blocks a protein, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, thought to be involved in the disease process. Teprotumumab appears to stop the disease from progressing and may also reverse it. A total of 15 centers worldwide were involved in the initial trial that was just reported, making it the largest clinical study of a biologic agent in Thyroid Eye Disease. Drs. Smith and Douglas served as lead investigators on this recently concluded trial. Both investigators will also supervise the upcoming trial. An estimated 20 million Americans suffer from some form of thyroid disease. The most common form of hyperthyroidism in North America, Graves' disease, causes several characteristic symptoms including extreme anxiety and fatigue, hand tremors, increased perspiration, and weight loss. The disease is often associated with bulging of the eyes, medically referred to as ophthalmopathy, and affects up to 50% of patients with Graves' disease. Teprotumumab works to block molecules that target tissues around the eye and in the immune system that result in the bulging appearance of Graves' eye disease. The decades-long work conducted at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles and later at the University of Michigan's Kellogg Eye Center in Ann Arbor has succeeded in ushering in a truly game-changing treatment for thyroid eye disease. Not only might Teprotumumab replace surgery, the drug represents the first and only medicine that has been shown to reverse the disease in a double masked, placebo controlled clinical trial. Initial reaction from the medical community has been extremely positive. The authors believe that the drug will help many patients suffering from Graves' disease. "Cedars Sinai Medical Center is extremely proud to serve as a center for this extraordinary therapy," said Dr. Bruce L. Gewertz, M.D, Chair, Department of Surgery and Vice-Dean for Academic Affairs, Cedars-Sinai. Dr. Terry J. Smith, the Frederick G.L. Huetwell Professor in Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Michigan, is an internationally-known endocrinologist who has studied Graves' disease, its eye manifestations, and related autoimmune disease for over 20 years. Dr. Smith's laboratory was first to describe the unique molecular attributes of tissue surrounding the eye that make it susceptible to inflammation in Graves' disease. Dr. Smith received his medical degree from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and completed his residency at the University of Illinois in Chicago and Sinai Hospital in Baltimore. He has completed fellowships in biophysics at the University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, in molecular biochemistry at Columbia University in New York, and clinical endocrinology at the Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago. Dr. Smith is the author of over 250 articles and book chapters, and has been awarded five patents for his research discoveries. He has been elected to the Orbit Society, is chief scientific officer for the National Graves' Foundation, and serves as reviewer for numerous scientific journals. Dr. Smith has been funded continuously by the National Institutes of Health and the Veterans Administration since 1983. Dr. Raymond Douglas is an experienced and board certified oculoplastic surgeon in Beverly Hills, CA. He specializes in reconstructive and aesthetic surgery. Patients with thyroid eye disease, previous unsuccessful surgery (blepharoplasty), cancers of the eyelids and face, and trauma-induced injuries all seek Dr. Douglas' expert care. Dr. Douglas also has a practice in Shanghai, China and is frequently asked to teach his novel techniques to other surgeons internationally. Prior to opening his private practice in Beverly Hills, he served as the director of the Thyroid Eye Disease Center at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center. His expertise in treating thyroid-associated eye diseases and cosmetic and reconstruction surgeries has made him a highly respected and sought after physician. Currently, Dr. Douglas is the Director of the Orbital and Thyroid Eye Disease program at the prestigious Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Dr. Douglas has published more than 100 peer-reviewed articles and textbook chapters and his special interest in thyroid eye disease has led him to lecture on the topic on a national and international basis. He is also the author of the definitive textbook on the many facets of care for thyroid eye disease. Dr. Douglas has earned a reputation for his customized approach to rehabilitation, which has led to safer treatments with less scarring and significantly faster recoveries. He sees patients in southern California, nationally and internationally and is committed to providing each patient with an individualized treatment plan on how to best restore their health, vitality and appearance.


FDA Designates Teprotumumab as a "Breakthrough Therapy" Combatting Thyroid Eye Disease; New England Journal of Medicine Publishes Paper on the Game-Changing Drug Co-Authored By Doctors Smith and Douglas ANN ARBOR, MI and LOS ANGELES, CA / ACCESSWIRE / May 16, 2017 / The University of Michigan's Dr. Terry J. Smith and Beverly Hills, California surgeon Dr. Raymond Douglas - two prominent physicians specializing in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy, also known as Graves' eye disease - have unveiled a dramatic new non-surgical treatment for Thyroid Eye Disease, one of the more serious symptoms of Graves' disease. Proof of the treatment's efficacy resulted from a 24 week treatment trial. The rationale for using Teprotumumab in thyroid eye disease was developed in Dr. Smith's laboratory over 20 years ago. The drug was repurposed from its initial target, cancer. It now has been designated by the FDA as a "breakthrough" therapy for Thyroid Eye Disease. This designation is reserved for drugs that are destined to radically change a specific field of medicine. A paper describing results of the clinical trial was published this month by the New England Journal of Medicine. A second trial is scheduled to begin enrolling participants later this Spring to further examine Teprotumumab's effectiveness. Several medical centers in the US and Europe will participate, including Cedars Sinai in Los Angeles, CA, La Peer Health Center in Beverly Hills, CA, and the University of Michigan's Kellogg Eye Center in Ann Arbor, MI. Identification of Teprotumumab as a therapy for Thyroid Eye Disease represents an approach that will potentially replace surgery as a treatment for this condition. Teprotumumab is a monoclonal antibody that blocks a protein, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, thought to be involved in the disease process. Teprotumumab appears to stop the disease from progressing and may also reverse it. A total of 15 centers worldwide were involved in the initial trial that was just reported, making it the largest clinical study of a biologic agent in Thyroid Eye Disease. Drs. Smith and Douglas served as lead investigators on this recently concluded trial. Both investigators will also supervise the upcoming trial. An estimated 20 million Americans suffer from some form of thyroid disease. The most common form of hyperthyroidism in North America, Graves' disease, causes several characteristic symptoms including extreme anxiety and fatigue, hand tremors, increased perspiration, and weight loss. The disease is often associated with bulging of the eyes, medically referred to as ophthalmopathy, and affects up to 50% of patients with Graves' disease. Teprotumumab works to block molecules that target tissues around the eye and in the immune system that result in the bulging appearance of Graves' eye disease. The decades-long work conducted at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles and later at the University of Michigan's Kellogg Eye Center in Ann Arbor has succeeded in ushering in a truly game-changing treatment for thyroid eye disease. Not only might Teprotumumab replace surgery, the drug represents the first and only medicine that has been shown to reverse the disease in a double masked, placebo controlled clinical trial. Initial reaction from the medical community has been extremely positive. The authors believe that the drug will help many patients suffering from Graves' disease. "Cedars Sinai Medical Center is extremely proud to serve as a center for this extraordinary therapy," said Dr. Bruce L. Gewertz, M.D, Chair, Department of Surgery and Vice-Dean for Academic Affairs, Cedars-Sinai. Dr. Terry J. Smith, the Frederick G.L. Huetwell Professor in Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Michigan, is an internationally-known endocrinologist who has studied Graves' disease, its eye manifestations, and related autoimmune disease for over 20 years. Dr. Smith's laboratory was first to describe the unique molecular attributes of tissue surrounding the eye that make it susceptible to inflammation in Graves' disease. Dr. Smith received his medical degree from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and completed his residency at the University of Illinois in Chicago and Sinai Hospital in Baltimore. He has completed fellowships in biophysics at the University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, in molecular biochemistry at Columbia University in New York, and clinical endocrinology at the Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago. Dr. Smith is the author of over 250 articles and book chapters, and has been awarded five patents for his research discoveries. He has been elected to the Orbit Society, is chief scientific officer for the National Graves' Foundation, and serves as reviewer for numerous scientific journals. Dr. Smith has been funded continuously by the National Institutes of Health and the Veterans Administration since 1983. Dr. Raymond Douglas is an experienced and board certified oculoplastic surgeon in Beverly Hills, CA. He specializes in reconstructive and aesthetic surgery. Patients with thyroid eye disease, previous unsuccessful surgery (blepharoplasty), cancers of the eyelids and face, and trauma-induced injuries all seek Dr. Douglas' expert care. Dr. Douglas also has a practice in Shanghai, China and is frequently asked to teach his novel techniques to other surgeons internationally. Prior to opening his private practice in Beverly Hills, he served as the director of the Thyroid Eye Disease Center at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center. His expertise in treating thyroid-associated eye diseases and cosmetic and reconstruction surgeries has made him a highly respected and sought after physician. Currently, Dr. Douglas is the Director of the Orbital and Thyroid Eye Disease program at the prestigious Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Dr. Douglas has published more than 100 peer-reviewed articles and textbook chapters and his special interest in thyroid eye disease has led him to lecture on the topic on a national and international basis. He is also the author of the definitive textbook on the many facets of care for thyroid eye disease. Dr. Douglas has earned a reputation for his customized approach to rehabilitation, which has led to safer treatments with less scarring and significantly faster recoveries. He sees patients in southern California, nationally and internationally and is committed to providing each patient with an individualized treatment plan on how to best restore their health, vitality and appearance. FDA Designates Teprotumumab as a "Breakthrough Therapy" Combatting Thyroid Eye Disease; New England Journal of Medicine Publishes Paper on the Game-Changing Drug Co-Authored By Doctors Smith and Douglas ANN ARBOR, MI and LOS ANGELES, CA / ACCESSWIRE / May 16, 2017 / The University of Michigan's Dr. Terry J. Smith and Beverly Hills, California surgeon Dr. Raymond Douglas - two prominent physicians specializing in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy, also known as Graves' eye disease - have unveiled a dramatic new non-surgical treatment for Thyroid Eye Disease, one of the more serious symptoms of Graves' disease. Proof of the treatment's efficacy resulted from a 24 week treatment trial. The rationale for using Teprotumumab in thyroid eye disease was developed in Dr. Smith's laboratory over 20 years ago. The drug was repurposed from its initial target, cancer. It now has been designated by the FDA as a "breakthrough" therapy for Thyroid Eye Disease. This designation is reserved for drugs that are destined to radically change a specific field of medicine. A paper describing results of the clinical trial was published this month by the New England Journal of Medicine. A second trial is scheduled to begin enrolling participants later this Spring to further examine Teprotumumab's effectiveness. Several medical centers in the US and Europe will participate, including Cedars Sinai in Los Angeles, CA, La Peer Health Center in Beverly Hills, CA, and the University of Michigan's Kellogg Eye Center in Ann Arbor, MI. Identification of Teprotumumab as a therapy for Thyroid Eye Disease represents an approach that will potentially replace surgery as a treatment for this condition. Teprotumumab is a monoclonal antibody that blocks a protein, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, thought to be involved in the disease process. Teprotumumab appears to stop the disease from progressing and may also reverse it. A total of 15 centers worldwide were involved in the initial trial that was just reported, making it the largest clinical study of a biologic agent in Thyroid Eye Disease. Drs. Smith and Douglas served as lead investigators on this recently concluded trial. Both investigators will also supervise the upcoming trial. An estimated 20 million Americans suffer from some form of thyroid disease. The most common form of hyperthyroidism in North America, Graves' disease, causes several characteristic symptoms including extreme anxiety and fatigue, hand tremors, increased perspiration, and weight loss. The disease is often associated with bulging of the eyes, medically referred to as ophthalmopathy, and affects up to 50% of patients with Graves' disease. Teprotumumab works to block molecules that target tissues around the eye and in the immune system that result in the bulging appearance of Graves' eye disease. The decades-long work conducted at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles and later at the University of Michigan's Kellogg Eye Center in Ann Arbor has succeeded in ushering in a truly game-changing treatment for thyroid eye disease. Not only might Teprotumumab replace surgery, the drug represents the first and only medicine that has been shown to reverse the disease in a double masked, placebo controlled clinical trial. Initial reaction from the medical community has been extremely positive. The authors believe that the drug will help many patients suffering from Graves' disease. "Cedars Sinai Medical Center is extremely proud to serve as a center for this extraordinary therapy," said Dr. Bruce L. Gewertz, M.D, Chair, Department of Surgery and Vice-Dean for Academic Affairs, Cedars-Sinai. Dr. Terry J. Smith, the Frederick G.L. Huetwell Professor in Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Michigan, is an internationally-known endocrinologist who has studied Graves' disease, its eye manifestations, and related autoimmune disease for over 20 years. Dr. Smith's laboratory was first to describe the unique molecular attributes of tissue surrounding the eye that make it susceptible to inflammation in Graves' disease. Dr. Smith received his medical degree from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and completed his residency at the University of Illinois in Chicago and Sinai Hospital in Baltimore. He has completed fellowships in biophysics at the University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, in molecular biochemistry at Columbia University in New York, and clinical endocrinology at the Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago. Dr. Smith is the author of over 250 articles and book chapters, and has been awarded five patents for his research discoveries. He has been elected to the Orbit Society, is chief scientific officer for the National Graves' Foundation, and serves as reviewer for numerous scientific journals. Dr. Smith has been funded continuously by the National Institutes of Health and the Veterans Administration since 1983. Dr. Raymond Douglas is an experienced and board certified oculoplastic surgeon in Beverly Hills, CA. He specializes in reconstructive and aesthetic surgery. Patients with thyroid eye disease, previous unsuccessful surgery (blepharoplasty), cancers of the eyelids and face, and trauma-induced injuries all seek Dr. Douglas' expert care. Dr. Douglas also has a practice in Shanghai, China and is frequently asked to teach his novel techniques to other surgeons internationally. Prior to opening his private practice in Beverly Hills, he served as the director of the Thyroid Eye Disease Center at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center. His expertise in treating thyroid-associated eye diseases and cosmetic and reconstruction surgeries has made him a highly respected and sought after physician. Currently, Dr. Douglas is the Director of the Orbital and Thyroid Eye Disease program at the prestigious Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Dr. Douglas has published more than 100 peer-reviewed articles and textbook chapters and his special interest in thyroid eye disease has led him to lecture on the topic on a national and international basis. He is also the author of the definitive textbook on the many facets of care for thyroid eye disease. Dr. Douglas has earned a reputation for his customized approach to rehabilitation, which has led to safer treatments with less scarring and significantly faster recoveries. He sees patients in southern California, nationally and internationally and is committed to providing each patient with an individualized treatment plan on how to best restore their health, vitality and appearance.


LOS ANGELES--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Last Thursday, 24Hr HomeCare’s CEO and one of its three original Co-Founders, David Allerby, took home the morning’s most prestigious award: the Healthcare CEO of the Year Award. The Healthcare Leadership Forum and Awards took place at the Omni Hotel Los Angeles and was hosted by the Los Angeles Business Journal. The annual event brought together the region’s most distinguished healthcare professionals for a panel discussion on the state of population health, delivery of care and impacts to businesses in Southern California. Following the panel, the LA Business Journal highlighted the accomplishments of individuals and organizations who are setting industry standards and raising the quality of healthcare within our communities. “I see this award as one that recognizes an individual who is truly spearheading the effort to elevate the care that is accessible to diverse neighborhoods across Southern California,” said Ryan Iwamoto, fellow Co-Founder and Chief Marketing Officer. “This year alone, David has led us to establish partnerships with Stanford Healthcare and Cedars Sinai for our Caregivers to serve as their extended staff, in addition to creating and implementing RideWith24™, our on-demand transportation service for seniors. David is that individual who is a driving force for providing better, quality healthcare, through and through.” Allerby has served as CEO of 24Hr HomeCare since the company opened its doors in 2008. With his vision and leadership, the company has expanded to thirteen locations throughout California, Arizona, and Texas. In February of 2013, Allerby was named by Forbes Magazine as one of America’s Most Promising CEOs under the age of 35. In 2016, Allerby was recognized as a Finalist for the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award. Allerby holds a B.S. in Business Administration from the University of Southern California. 24Hr HomeCare is a Los Angeles-based company that provides high-quality, customized, professional caregiving services to seniors and children and adults with developmental disabilities, allowing them to continue full, active and healthy lifestyles. Founded by David Allerby, Tyner Brenneman-Slay, and Ryan Iwamoto in 2008, 24Hr HomeCare has expanded to thirteen locations throughout California, Arizona, and Dallas, hiring over 3,000 employees. Services include assistance with personal care, meal preparation, medication reminders, light housekeeping, and transportation services. In 2014, 24Hr HomeCare was listed by Forbes Magazine as the #24 Most Promising Company in America, and in 2016, the company was named to the INC 500/5000 list for the fourth consecutive year.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

The video commerce company participates in the annual star-studded event MINNEAPOLIS, May 04, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Evine Live Inc. (“Evine”) (NASDAQ:EVLV), a multiplatform video commerce company (evine.com), today announced that it will support the 24th annual Race to Erase MS Gala on May 5, held at The Beverly Hilton in Los Angeles. A platinum sponsor of the star-studded gala, Evine is making a financial donation as well as donating several auction items to help raise funds in the fight against multiple sclerosis (MS), a disease that impacts over 2 million people worldwide. Following the gala event, Nancy Davis will appear live on Evine on May 19 - 21 with her signature “Peace & Love” branded product, including a co-branded timepiece created in partnership with Invicta, Evine’s best-selling watch brand. “It is an honor for Evine to partner with Nancy Davis and the Race to Erase MS to help find a cure for multiple sclerosis,” said Bob Rosenblatt, Chief Executive Officer of Evine. “MS is a disease that impacts some of our closest vendors, investors and customers, and we are humbled to support such a worthy cause. I look forward to having the opportunity to demonstrate Evine’s ‘Be Good to Others’ mantra as we partner with Nancy to help support research toward eradicating this debilitating disease.” The Race to Erase MS was founded by Davis in 1993 after being diagnosed with the disease. Since 1994, the foundation has raise more than $46 million in contributions. Funding research is the core focus of the foundation, with all funds raised supporting the Center Without Walls program, a nationwide collaboration of physicians and scientists all working to find a cure. “When I was first diagnosed, there were no drugs on the market to help stop the progression of MS. Today, there are 15 FDA-approved drugs to treat the symptoms of MS, and the FDA recently approved Ocrevus, which helps people with relapsing remitting MS in addition to people with primary progressive MS,” said Nancy David, founder of Race to Erase MS and owner of Peace & Love Jewelry. “That progress gives me hope and makes me grateful for all the people and organizations who have supported the Race to Erase MS. Evine has been an amazing partner over the past two years. The company’s generosity and willingness to raise awareness and money for MS research keeps our hope for finding a cure alive.” Happening on Friday, May 5, the 24th annual Race to Erase MS Gala is a star-studded event frequented by some of the biggest names in Hollywood. This year’s event will honor Jamie-Lynn Sigler, most notably known for her role as Meadow Soprano on HBO’s “The Sopranos,” with the 2017 Medal of Hope Award. Evine will send its own star-power, with host Heather Hall interviewing attendees on the red carpet along with Dr. Terry and Heather Dubrow as guests of honor. In addition to the financial donation, Evine will also offer several auction items, including an “Evine Experience.” As part of the experience, the auction’s winner would receive a two-night travel package to Evine studios, including airfare and hotel for two. While at the studios, the winner would be given a backstage tour, the opportunity to pitch their product and a chance to sell a product live on Evine’s television network. Invicta, Evine’s best-selling watch brand, has also created a timepiece especially for Davis’ foundation. Based on the popular Invicta Peace & Love watch released in early 2015, this year’s Invicta Peace & Love Lupah will be offered in both men’s and women’s styles and include six additional easy-to-change colorful straps. Each timepiece proudly displays Nancy Davis’s signature Peace & Love logo on its dial and comes packaged in a specially-designed gift box. Returning to Evine May 19 at 8pm ET, May 20 at 1am, 3pm and 8pm ET, and May 21 throughout the day, Davis will present the co-branded watch and new pieces from her Peace & Love gemstone jewelry collection, including a white topaz and zircon adjustable bracelet, offered in 14 different styles. For more information on the Race to Erase MS, visit www.erasems.org. To bid on the “Evine Experience,” visit http://bit.ly/2oMxhPK. For more information on Evine and to shop Davis’ full collection, go to www.evine.com/peaceandlove. About Evine Evine Live Inc. (NASDAQ:EVLV) operates Evine, a multiplatform video commerce company that offers a compelling mix of proprietary and name brands directly to consumers in an engaging and informative shopping experience via television, online and mobile. Evine reaches approximately 87 million cable and satellite television homes 24 hours a day with entertaining content in a comprehensive digital shopping experience. About Race to Erase MS Race to Erase MS is dedicated to the treatment and ultimate cure for MS.  Funding research is the core focus of the foundation and significant strides have been made to find the cause and cure of this debilitating disease.  At the event’s inception 24 years ago, the absence of medications and therapies encouraged its involvement; the Race has been instrumental in funding many pilot studies that have contributed to drugs now on the market and other very important therapies that are improving the lives of people suffering from MS. All funds raised support the Center Without Walls program, a unique collaboration of the world’s leading MS research scientists currently representing Harvard, Yale, Cedars Sinai, University of Southern California, Oregon Health Science University, UC San Francisco and Johns Hopkins.  This nationwide collaboration of physicians, scientists and clinicians are on the cutting-edge of innovative research and therapeutic approaches to treat MS.  It is the hope of the Race to Erase MS that in addition to combating MS through research in a clinical environment, awareness will be created by educating the public about this mysterious disease. Tickets to the 24th Annual Race to Erase MS Gala start at $1,000 and tables start at $10,000. To purchase tickets for the event, please contact info@erasems.org or (310) 440-4842.


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

Two of the top-rated Cardiologists in Las Vegas, Sean Ameli, M.D. and Berge Dadourian, M.D., have expanded their Concierge Cardiology practice to include Primary Care services. Ameli-Dadourian Heart Center is the first concierge medical practice in Las Vegas to offer Cardiology Medicine and Primary Care.​Las Vegas, United States - April 25, 2017 /PressCable/ — Ameli | Dadourian Heart Center is the first concierge medical practice in Las Vegas to offer Cardiology Medicine and Primary Care. LAS VEGAS, NV, March 1, 2017 – Two of the top-rated Cardiologists in Las Vegas, Sean Ameli, M.D. and Berge Dadourian, M.D., have expanded their Concierge Cardiology practice to include Primary Care services. Dr. Ameli and Dr. Dadourian, are Board Certified in both Cardiovascular and Internal Medicine. They served as Chief Residents and Clinical Instructors at UCLA-Cedars Sinai Medical Centers. In August of 2015, Ameli | Dadourian Heart Center established the first Concierge Cardiology Practice in Las Vegas. These health care leaders are now the first and only Cardiology and Internal Medicine Practice to offer patients a continuum of care by adding Concierge Primary Care to their Cardiology practice. The Ameli | Dadourian Heart Center is uniquely positioned to offer this personal, integrated health care model to Las Vegas residents. “Our concierge Cardiology practice allows us to spend more time with the patient in a non-rushed setting which typically leads to better outcomes,” said Sean Ameli, M.D., a partner in the Ameli | Dadourian Heart Center. “Now, by expanding this personal approach to also focus on primary care, we are providing that same attention required to diagnose and treat acute and chronic illnesses and address disease prevention, health maintenance, and patient education.” According to Berge Dadourian, M.D., “We take as much time as needed to learn of each patient’s needs and concerns.” Patients at the Ameli | Dadourian Heart Center can now select Cardiology membership or the expanded combined Primary Care with Cardiology Care option. “The addition of Primary Care services now gives us the opportunity to coordinate a patient’s complete care and eliminate the need for multiple doctors and appointments. We can be more efficient and help reduce redundant appointments and testing,” said Dr. Dadourian. Ameli | Dadourian Heart Center provides highly rated, personalized cardiology and primary care services to its members. A variety of diagnostic tests offered in the office include Ultrasounds, EKG, Lab draws, Treadmill, Pacemaker Checks, Pulmonary Function, Nuclear Medicine, and Holter Monitoring. Dr. Ameli and Dr. Dadourian have a combined 50 years of experience and have trained at some of the most prestigious programs and universities in the United States. The Ameli | Dadourian Heart Center accepts Medicare and most insurance plans. About Ameli | Dadourian Heart Center The Ameli | Dadourian Heart Center is a concierge cardiology and primary care practice located in Tivoli Village in Summerlin in Las Vegas, NV. Their patients have access to same day or next day appointments, phones are answered by the friendly and knowledgeable team, assistance in scheduling other medical services, same day prescription refill, and ongoing educational and preventive programs. Learn more about Ameli | Dadourian Heart Center at www.ameliheartcenter.com or call 702.906.1100. Contact Info:Name: Amy GodsoeEmail: agodsoe@ameliheartcenter.comOrganization: Ameli | Dadourian Heart CenterAddress: 400 South Rampart Boulevard Suite 240, Las Vegas, Nevada 89145, United StatesPhone: +1-702-906-1100For more information, please visit http://www.ameliheartcenter.comSource: PressCableRelease ID: 189811


LOS ANGELES (May 30, 2017) -- Efforts to reduce hospital readmissions are working, but they're not always saving money, according to a new Cedars-Sinai study. Many medical centers are tackling the readmission problem by trying to pinpoint the root causes of unnecessary repeat hospitalizations. A Cedars-Sinai-led team of investigators systematically evaluated the effectiveness and financial benefit of quality improvement programs at medical centers in the U.S. and elsewhere. The team, led by Teryl Nuckols, MD, MSHS, conducted a systematic review of data from 50 quality improvement studies involving more than 16,700 patients. Among the findings: Quality improvement interventions reduced readmissions by an average of 12.1 percent for heart failure patients and 6.3 percent for older adults with diverse health issues. But savings to health systems varied. The investigators gauged how much money these interventions saved or cost health systems by measuring expenses for hospitals, physicians, other providers and payers. They found average net savings for health systems of $972 per person among heart failure patients and average net losses of $169 per person among other patients. However, costs varied so widely across studies that the authors could not conclude definitively whether these interventions saved or lost money. Among older adults, interventions that engaged patients and caregivers yielded the most net savings per patient. For example, several interventions involved nurses or pharmacists training patients and family members about how to manage medications after discharge, which types of activities are appropriate and which symptoms might represent something serious. The study was published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine. Nuckols, director of the Division of General Internal Medicine in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Medicine, said she was surprised that the interventions didn't save more money across the board. Nuckols said the results counter a widely held belief that reducing readmissions should save money by preventing additional costs for return hospital stays. "Hospitalization is very expensive, so avoiding even a few readmissions should have saved a lot of money," she said. "Our findings suggest that there is no guarantee of net cost savings once the implementation costs associated with efforts to prevent readmissions are considered." Adding urgency to the study, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services now penalize institutions for excessive readmissions. As a result, almost 2,600 hospitals are expected to lose a total of more than $500 million in payments this year, according to analysis of government data by Advisory Board, a healthcare consulting and research firm. Study co-authors included Joshua Pevnick, MD, assistant professor of Medicine, and Laura Anderson, MS, both from Cedars-Sinai; researchers from the RAND Corp. in Santa Monica; the College of Science at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia; the UCLA Jonathan and Karin Fielding School of Public Health in Los Angeles; and the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System. The team's work was supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Cedars-Sinai is a leader in providing high-quality healthcare encompassing primary care, specialized medicine and research. Since 1902, Cedars-Sinai has evolved to meet the needs of one of the most diverse regions in the nation, setting standards in quality and innovative patient care, research, teaching and community service. Today, Cedars-Sinai is known for its national leadership in transforming healthcare for the benefit of patients. Cedars-Sinai impacts the future of healthcare by developing new approaches to treatment and educating tomorrow's health professionals. Additionally, Cedars-Sinai demonstrates a commitment to the community through programs that improve the health of its most vulnerable residents.


Home > Press > Cedars-Sinai, UCLA Scientists Use New ‘Blood Biopsies’ With Experimental Device to Speed Cancer Diagnosis and Predict Disease Spread: Leading-Edge Research Is Part of National Cancer Moonshot Initiative Abstract: A team of investigators from Cedars-Sinai and UCLA is using a new blood-analysis technique and tiny experimental device to help physicians predict which cancers are likely to spread by identifying and characterizing tumor cells circulating through the blood. The investigators are conducting “liquid biopsies” by running blood through a postage-stamp-sized chip with nanowires 1,000 times thinner than a human hair and coated with antibodies, or proteins, that recognize circulating tumor cells. The device, the NanoVelcro Chip, works by “grabbing” circulating tumor cells, which break away from tumors and travel through the bloodstream, looking for places in the body to spread. Use of the chip in liquid biopsies could allow doctors to regularly and easily monitor cancer-related changes in patients, such as how well they’re responding to treatment. The research earned the lead investigators a place on the U.S. Cancer Moonshot program, an initiative led by former Vice President Joe Biden to make available more therapies to more patients and to prevent cancer. “It’s far better to draw a tube of blood once a month to monitor cancer than to make patients undergo repeated surgical procedures,” said Edwin Posadas, MD, medical director of the Urologic Oncology Program at Cedars-Sinai’s Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute and one of the lead investigators. “The power of this technology lies in its capacity to provide information that is equal to or even superior to traditional tumor sampling by invasive procedures.” Although some forms of prostate cancer are so slow-growing that they pose little risk to patients, other forms of the disease are lethal. Identifying which patients have which type of disease has become a crucial area of study because prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death among men in the U.S. Nearly 27,000 U.S. men are expected to die from the disease in 2017, according to the American Cancer Society. The research team has determined that in certain cancer cells, the nucleus is smaller than in other, more typical, cancer cells. Patients with the most advanced cases of aggressive prostate cancer have cells with these very small nuclei. The investigators’ teamwork also revealed that very small nuclei are associated with metastasis, or cancer spread, to the liver and lung in patients with advanced cases of prostate cancer. Those nuclei developed before the metastases were detected. Identifying very small nuclei early in the disease progression may help pinpoint which patients have high risk of developing cancer that can spread and be fatal. Hsian-Rong Tseng, PhD, professor, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the other lead investigator, said that his work with Posadas is focused on improving the quality of life for cancer patients. “We’re on a mission to dramatically change patients’ everyday lives and their long-term outcomes,” Tseng said. “We now have powerful new tools to accomplish that.” Posadas and Tseng join an elite cadre of academicians, technology leaders and pharmaceutical experts as partners in the Blood Profiling Atlas in Cancer (BloodPAC) Project, a Moonshot program. Participants will collect and share data gathered from circulating tumor cells. Posadas and Tseng expect to contribute microscopic images from 1,000 circulating tumor cells that have not yet been analyzed, as well as additional data and cells they have cataloged. For the past five years, Posadas and Tseng have collected blood samples from cancer patients to profile and analyze the circulating tumor cells and other components. That process has helped them understand how prostate and other cancers evolve. The two investigators and their teams hope their findings will contribute to developing effective, targeted treatments for many types of cancer. “Minimally invasive methods to both diagnose and follow cancer, through simple blood tests, offer a unique and novel approach that can lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment, leading to more cures,” said Robert A. Figlin, MD, director of the Division of Hematology Oncology and deputy director of the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute at Cedars- Sinai. About Cedars-Sinai Cedars-Sinai is a leader in providing high-quality healthcare encompassing primary care, specialized medicine and research. Since 1902, Cedars-Sinai has evolved to meet the needs of one of the most diverse regions in the nation, setting standards in quality and innovative patient care, research, teaching and community service. Today, Cedars-Sinai is known for its national leadership in transforming healthcare for the benefit of patients. Cedars-Sinai impacts the future of healthcare by developing new approaches to treatment and educating tomorrow’s health professionals. Additionally, Cedars-Sinai demonstrates a commitment to the community through programs that improve the health of its most vulnerable residents. About the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA Since opening in 1951, the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA has grown into an internationally recognized leader in research, medical education, patient care and public service. It has almost 2,000 full-time faculty members, including recipients of the Nobel Prize, the Pulitzer Prize and the National Medal of Science. More than 1,400 residents and fellows pursue advanced training at UCLA and its affiliated hospitals, which include Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | November 20, 2016
Site: marketersmedia.com

Beverly Hills Sinus Center is happy to announce the newest addition to their prestigious group, Dr. Evan Walgama! Dr. Walgama is a fellowship-trained sinus and skull base surgeon and will serve as Co-Director of the Beverly Hills Sinus Center in Cedars Sinai with Dr. Arthur Wu. He has trained under many nationally prominent sinus surgeons throughout his education and is proud to offer the highest level of care available to Los Angeles patients. Dr. Walgama specializes in chronic sinusitis, nasal polyposis, sinonasal tumors, and endoscopic skull base surgery. He enjoys treating the difficult-to-control sinusitis cases, particularly those patients who have required multiple previous sinus surgeries. His goal is to perform surgery that optimizes further medical management and keeps patients from having to return to surgery. He also treats complex skull disorders such as pituitary tumors, cerebrospinal fluid leaks, chordomas, and benign or malignant nose, sinus and nasopharynx tumors. These challenging cases are often handled in collaboration with other top tier physicians to ensure the best possible outcome. Dr. Walgama graduated with honors from the University of Texas at Austin with a Bachelors degree in philosophy. He received his M.D. from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas and was a junior member of Alpha Omega Alpha honor society. He completed a five-year residency in Otolaryngology at the same institution where he served as chief resident at Parkland Memorial Hospital. He then completed a one-year fellowship in Endoscopic Sinus and Skull Base Surgery at Stanford University under the mentorship of Peter Hwang, MD. In addition to his clinical practice, Dr. Walgama is active in clinical research. He has presented original research at national meetings and publishes in peer-reviewed journals. He is a member of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and the American Rhinologic Society. The Beverly Hills Sinus Center is known as a center of excellence in Southern California for compassionate care and cutting edge research in the field of nasal and sinus diseases. Located in the world renown Cedars-Sinai Medical Center Towers and headed by Dr. Arthur Wu, the Beverly Hills Sinus Center is the premier sinus center serving the Greater Los Angeles Area. Click Here for additional information or contact Beverly Hills Sinus Center at (310) 423-1220. For more information, please visit http://www.beverlyhillssinus.com

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