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News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

The Latest: Renault plant closed because of cyberattack (AP) — The latest on the global extortion cyberattack that hit dozens of countries (all times local): In France, auto manufacturer Renault said one of its plants, which employs 3,500 people in Douai, northern France, wasn't reopening Monday as technicians continued to deal with the aftermath of the global cyberattack. The company described the temporary halt in production as a "preventative step." The company gave no details on the degree to which the plant was affected by the malware. Renault said all of its other plants in France were open Monday. The problem with its home page wasn't ransomware after all, Osaka city hall said. The site is now back up but the real cause of the problem is not yet clear, said spokesman Hajime Nishikawa. Kyodo News said one personal computer was affected at one office at East Japan Railway Co., but train services were not affected. A Japanese nonprofit says computers at 600 locations had been hit in the global "ransomware" cyberattack. Nissan Motor Co. confirmed Monday some units had been targeted, but there was no major impact on its business. Hitachi spokeswoman Yuko Tainiuchi said emails were slow or not getting delivered, and files could not be opened. The company believes the problems are related to the ransomware attack, although no ransom is being demanded. They were installing software to fix the problems. The Japan Computer Emergency Response Team Coordination Center said 2,000 computers in Japan were reported affected so far, citing an affiliate foreign security organization that it cannot identify. At least one hospital was affected, according to police. The city of Osaka said its home page went blank, although problems had not been detected otherwise. South Korea has been mostly spared from the global cyber chaos that crippled scores of governments and companies in 150 countries. Director Shin Dae Kyu at the state-run Korea Internet & Security Agency who monitors the private sector said Monday that five companies have reported they were targeted by a global "ransomware" cyberattack. While some companies did not report damages to the government, South Korea was yet to see crippling damages, he said. The most public damage was on the country's largest movie chain. CJ CGV Co. was restoring its advertising servers at dozens of its movie theaters after the attack left the company unable to display trailers of upcoming movies. Its movie ticket systems were unaffected. Another government security official said no government systems were affected. Global cyber chaos is spreading Monday as companies boot up computers at work following the weekend's worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack. The extortion scheme has created chaos in 150 countries and could wreak even greater havoc as more malicious variations appear. The initial attack, known as "WannaCry," paralyzed computers running Britain's hospital network, Germany's national railway and scores of other companies and government agencies around the world. As a loose global network of cybersecurity experts fought the ransomware hackers, in China, state media said more than 29,000 institutions had been infected along with hundreds of thousands of devices. The Japan Computer Emergency Response Team Coordination Center, a nonprofit providing support for computer attacks, said 2,000 computers at 600 locations in Japan were reported affected so far.


They complain that cheap Spanish wine is undercutting them, but is the answer in the marketplace, or in violence? Dozens of winegrowers from France's Languedoc region swept through three supermarkets in Nîmes on March 30, in search of wine they believe is threatening their livelihood: low-priced Spanish wine. To the dismay of supermarket staff, who stood watching, the vigilante vignerons climbed the shelves, smashing wine bottles and emptying boxed wine cartons onto the floor of the aisle. They piled shopping carts with more bottles, which they subsequently dumped on the pavement of the parking lot. The growers—the combined forces of the Jeunes Agriculteurs (JA) of the Gard region and the recently formed Syndicate of Vigernons Gardois—argue that the packaging of these wines hoodwinks consumers into thinking they are buying French wine. "We undertook this sweep to put pressure on the supermarket," said Zoé Cuxac, a JA spokesperson. A day later, Madrid responded with a scathing letter from its ministry of foreign affairs to counterparts in Paris, denouncing the continued attacks on Spanish wine as an "attack on freedom of trade" and a "blatant violation of the single market, a fundamental pillar of the European Union." This is not the first action by the JA. On Jan. 17, the activists drove to the toll booth at Gallargues-le-Montueux on the A9 autoroute, on the border between the Gard and Hérault departments. They encircled tanker trucks, demanding to see the bills of lading detailing their cargo. "We made sure they understood we would not hurt them or their truck," said Anais Amalric, copresident of the JA. A tanker belonging to a French négociant had picked up Spanish wine in the port of Sète, which was to be delivered to Saone et Loire for the production of flavored wine. The activists opened the valves and emptied the tanker onto the pavement. Violent protest by winemakers in the Languedoc is nothing new. It dates back a century. And for more than a decade now, a group called the Comité Régional d'Action Viticole (CRAV) has been attacking targets. Their anti-globalization complaints were even picked up by French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen. In separate attacks since January, the graffiti tags of the Comité d'Action Viticole (CAV) and CRAV have been found at various crime scenes, including a tanker truck in Narbonne emptied of its cargo of Spanish bulk wine; the torched Béziers offices of Vergnes and Passerieux, one of the biggest wine brokers in France; the destroyed pick up area of a drive-thru supermarket; an arson attack on the building housing the refrigeration system of an Intermarché supermarket; shopping carts set ablaze in supermarket parking lots; and two explosions targeting négociant Jeanjean in Saint-Félix-de-Lodez. For the Spanish government, the violence represents "a bankruptcy of the rule of law." The arson attacks are being investigated by Montpellier authorities. In the past, French prosecutors have gone after both CAV and CRAV, whose actions have included kidnapping, vandalism and bombings. It's unclear whether the JA activists will be prosecuted. "We don't know. We're waiting for the phone to ring," admitted Amalric. Unlike the CAV and CRAV combatants, the JA activists don't hide their identities. And recently they announced softer battle tactics. "We realized it wasn't the best image for us—that of 'destroyers,'" said Cuxac. "We're a syndicate, and we want to have a dialogue, said Amalric, who has 99 acres under vine and sells to a local cooperative. "If I hid my face behind a balaclava, we wouldn't be meeting with Prodis [the wine subsidiary of Carrefour]." JA's leaders met with Carrefour management in March. The supermarket is a top retailer for wine in France. JA members hope the meeting will be the first step toward securing a three-year supply contract with fixed prices for their wine and long-term partnerships with the supermarkets and négociants, said JA copresident Lionel Puech. JA has also recently launched an educational campaign that includes handing out flyers outside supermarkets. "We've included a coupon for a 5 percent discount on wine bought at the local caves and co-ops," said Cuxac. But neither flyers, nor coupons, nor even attacks on supermarkets change the fact that Spanish bulk wine is almost half the price of French bulk wine, and the prices are stable. "The Spanish sell the wine at €32 per hectoliter, and with the transport to France, it arrives at €40 per hectoliter," said Puech, who runs his family's 89-acre vineyard in the Pays d'Oc. "We sell at €80 to €85 per hectoliter. We don't have the same labor costs, and they can use cheaper vine treatments banned in France." Last year, France imported more than $730 million worth of foreign wine, and the vast majority, the equivalent of 68 million cases, was bulk wine without Geographical Indication or varietal. More than 61 million cases came from Spain. The cheap table wine is used for bag-in-the-box, high-volume brands and flavored wine drinks. "Over the last decade, Spain has reorganized part of its entry-level wine production. They are producing large quantities in an industrial way. Italians are also quite well organized," said Philipipe Castéja, CEO of négociant Borie Manoux and a council member in the trade group Fédération des Exportateurs de Vins & Spiritueux de France. In France, struggling growers are grubbing up vines and leaving the land fallow. "We lost 5,000 hectares [12,355 acres] last year because of structural problems with agriculture in the south," said Casteja. "There's been no effort to encourage people to create bigger estates." "In the Languedoc, we've lost 13 percent of the vine surface area in 10 years," said Puech. In an interview with Wine Spectator, Henri Cabanel, who is both a winegrower and a senator representing Hérault, offered a suggestion: "Rather than resisting and fighting with each other, I think we, the growers, need to develop a strategy with the négociants and supermarkets, agreeing to supply them with a certain amount of low-end, mechanized production while respecting French quality. It's a win-win solution." Cabanel owns a 67-acre vineyard in Servian, selling his crop to the local cooperative, Les Vignerons de l'Occitane, of which he was once the president. He argues that cooperatives are well placed to manage vast, irrigated, mechanized vineyards. Most growers are producing wine with Geographic Indication, which is held to higher standards and costs more to make. "The négociants need wine without Geographic Indication and growers aren't producing it," Cabanel said. "It's wiser to supply the entire price range. This is a commercial strategy." Castéja agrees. "We have the space, the same climate. Spain has done it. France can do it." Given a larger supply of wine at low, stable prices, French exporters say they will not only remain competitive but conquer new markets. "We, the French, can sell more wine," said Castéja. "Definitely." But JA leaders are skeptical. "French vineyards have been through many crises. We were told by the négociants that we produced too much wine, so we changed the grape varieties, chose clones that were less productive, invested in our cellars to improve quality," said Puech. "And now they say we must produce more at a lower quality. That's taking us back 20 years. We'll never be able to compete with Spain's low prices—our payroll taxes are higher." And so the debate continues. But will the young vignerons continue with negotiations and peaceful protests? Or will bottles start smashing again?


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

The Latest: IT expert modest about stopping cyberattack (AP) — The latest on the global extortion cyberattack that hit dozens of countries (all times local): The IT expert who helped stop the spread of the WannaCry cyberattack says he believes the fight against the infection is "done and dusted." Twenty-two-year-old Marcus Hutchins, who works for Los Angeles-based cybersecurity firm Kryptos Logic, says although he was the person who registered a domain name that took down the virus, hundreds of others helped in the effort In his first face-to-face interview, Hutchins said Monday hundreds of computer experts worked throughout the weekend to fight the virus, which paralyzed computers in some 150 countries. Hutchins told The Associated Press he doesn't consider himself a hero but fights malware because "it's the right thing to do." Security researchers are looking at possible connections between the global "ransomware" attack and North Korea, though one firm cautions that the connection is "weak." The security company Kaspersky Lab says portions of the "WannaCry" ransomware use the same code as malware previously distributed by Lazarus, a group behind the 2014 Sony hack blamed on North Korea. But it's possible the code was simply copied from the Lazarus malware without any other direct connection. Another security company, Symantec, has also found similarities between WannaCry and Lazarus tools, but says "they so far only represent weak connections. We are continuing to investigate for stronger connections." WannaCry has paralyzed computers running factories, banks, government agencies and transport systems in some 150 countries. A law enforcement official says investigators believe additional companies in the United States have been affected by the global "ransomware" software cyberattack but have not yet come forward to report the attacks. The official spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the official was not authorized to speak publicly about an ongoing investigation. The official says that investigators have obtained some of the phishing emails and are analyzing them for "bread crumbs" that may lead them to the attackers. Authorities have been encouraging affected companies to contact law enforcement and not pay the ransom. While the attack that emerged Friday hitting companies and governments around the world ebbed in intensity Monday, experts warned that new versions of the virus could emerge. Investigators fear the ransomware can be re-released without a kill switch that allowed researchers to interrupt the malware's initial spread. President Donald Trump's homeland security adviser says that so far, no U.S. federal systems have been affected by the global cyberattack. Tom Bossert says the U.S. government has been closely monitoring the attack, which has affected an estimated 300,000 machines in 150 countries. He noted a few U.S. businesses, including Fed Ex, were affected. Computers across the world were locked up Friday and users' files held for ransom when dozens of countries were hit in a cyber-extortion attack that targeted hospitals, companies and government agencies. Cybersecurity experts say the unknown hackers who launched the "ransomware" attacks used a hole in Microsoft software that was discovered by the National Security Agency and exposed when NSA documents were leaked online. Neither the FBI or NSA would comment Monday. Investigators looking to catch the perpetrators of the global "ransomware" attack will be looking for digital clues, including monitoring the bitcoin accounts used to collect ransom payments. It'll be tough, but not impossible. Security experts say that bitcoin is often believed to be anonymous, but the transactions are highly traceable. What's not known is who's behind a particular account. But the bitcoin money often has to be converted into real-world currency at some point. Steve Grobman of the security company McAfee says forensics experts will also be looking for clues in the structure of the malware, including how it was written and how it was run. He says the malware was sophisticated, helping to rule out pranksters and lower-level thieves. The cyberattack that emerged Friday has paralyzed computers running factories, banks, government agencies and transport systems around the world. Interpol's cybercrime unit, based in Singapore, said it is working on information provided by the private Kaspersky Lab to assist investigations in the countries affected. Europol has said the same. But neither agency has actual enforcement capabilities, instead acting more as information clearinghouses and organizers in the complex world of international law enforcement, where police from different countries rarely have a language in common — and few speak the languages of computer programming. Costin Raiu, head of Kaspersky's global research and analysis, whose group has two analysts directly embedded with Interpol, said a main pitfall will be sharing intelligence in real time, and then being able to follow the accumulated evidence to a suspect. Raiu said investigators are scouring the Tor darknet to trace the command and control servers. The attackers are believed to be relatively new at the ransomware business, he said. "The attack appears to be slowing down anyway. What we are afraid of are copycats," he said. Germany's interior ministry says software companies need to do their own homework, rather than blame governments for security breaches. Microsoft's top lawyer, Brad Smith, had criticized governments Sunday for "hoarding" vulnerabilities and urged authorities to report security problems to IT firms "rather than stockpile, sell, or exploit them." Interior ministry spokesman Tobias Plate said "someone who doesn't do their homework trying to make others responsible for not pointing out this homework needs to be done seems to me to mix up cause and effect." Plate told reporters in Berlin on Monday that the German government had published a new cybersecurity strategy last year that includes a proposal to hold IT companies liable for security flaws. German rail company Deutsche Bahn's platform displays were hit by the global "ransomware" cyberattack. Tom Bossert, a homeland security adviser to U.S. President Donald Trump, says the recent global cyberattack is something that "for right now, we've got under control" in the United States. Bossert tells ABC's "Good Morning America" that the malware is an "extremely serious threat" that could inspire copycat attacks. But Microsoft's security patch released in March should protect U.S. networks for those who install it. Micrsoft's top lawyer has criticized U.S. intelligence for "stockpiling" software code that can aid hackers. Cybersecurity experts say the unknown hackers behind the latest attacks used a vulnerability exposed in U.S. government documents leaked online. Bossert said "criminals" are responsible, not the U.S. government. Bossert says the U.S. hasn't ruled out involvement by a foreign government, but that the recent ransom demands suggest a criminal network. Indian authorities were on high alert for news of malfunctioning computers Monday, after experts estimated 5 percent of affected computers were in the country. The Computer Emergency Response Team of India issued a red-colored "critical alert" — it's highest alarm level — and urged computer users to update their systems and use protective software. But few major problems were reported. The head of the government response team told Press Trust of India news agency that "everything seems to be normal, so far. No reports have come in" detailing cyberattacks in the country. The Kaspersky Lab, a security solutions firm, had estimated that up to 5 percent of computers affected globally could be in India. The country is considered vulnerable thanks to a large number of computers running on older Microsoft operating systems. Britain's health service says most hospitals hit by the global "ransomware" attack are back up and running, but seven are still experiencing IT disruption and canceling appointments. About a fifth of NHS trusts — the regional bodies that run hospitals and clinics — were hit by the attack on Friday, leading to thousands of canceled appointments and operations. Health officials say seven of the 47 affected are still having IT problems and have asked for "extra support" from the National Health Service. Barts Health, which runs five London hospitals, says it is still sending some ambulances to other hospitals and has canceled some surgeries and outpatient appointments. Ciaran Martin, chief executive of the U.K.'s National Cyber Security Centre, has warned that more computers could be infected Monday as doctors' practices re-opened after the weekend. In France, auto manufacturer Renault said one of its plants, which employs 3,500 people in Douai, northern France, wasn't reopening Monday as technicians continued to deal with the aftermath of the global cyberattack. The company described the temporary halt in production as a "preventative step." The company gave no details on the degree to which the plant was affected by the malware. Renault said all of its other plants in France were open Monday. The problem with its home page wasn't ransomware after all, Osaka city hall said. The site is now back up but the real cause of the problem is not yet clear, said spokesman Hajime Nishikawa. Kyodo News said one personal computer was affected at one office at East Japan Railway Co., but train services were not affected. A Japanese nonprofit says computers at 600 locations had been hit in the global "ransomware" cyberattack. Nissan Motor Co. confirmed Monday some units had been targeted, but there was no major impact on its business. Hitachi spokeswoman Yuko Tainiuchi said emails were slow or not getting delivered, and files could not be opened. The company believes the problems are related to the ransomware attack, although no ransom is being demanded. They were installing software to fix the problems. The Japan Computer Emergency Response Team Coordination Center said 2,000 computers in Japan were reported affected so far, citing an affiliate foreign security organization that it cannot identify. At least one hospital was affected, according to police. The city of Osaka said its home page went blank, although problems had not been detected otherwise. South Korea has been mostly spared from the global cyber chaos that crippled scores of governments and companies in 150 countries. Director Shin Dae Kyu at the state-run Korea Internet & Security Agency who monitors the private sector said Monday that five companies have reported they were targeted by a global "ransomware" cyberattack. While some companies did not report damages to the government, South Korea was yet to see crippling damages, he said. The most public damage was on the country's largest movie chain. CJ CGV Co. was restoring its advertising servers at dozens of its movie theaters after the attack left the company unable to display trailers of upcoming movies. Its movie ticket systems were unaffected. Another government security official said no government systems were affected. Global cyber chaos is spreading Monday as companies boot up computers at work following the weekend's worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack. The extortion scheme has created chaos in 150 countries and could wreak even greater havoc as more malicious variations appear. The initial attack, known as "WannaCry," paralyzed computers running Britain's hospital network, Germany's national railway and scores of other companies and government agencies around the world. As a loose global network of cybersecurity experts fought the ransomware hackers, in China, state media said more than 29,000 institutions had been infected along with hundreds of thousands of devices. The Japan Computer Emergency Response Team Coordination Center, a nonprofit providing support for computer attacks, said 2,000 computers at 600 locations in Japan were reported affected so far.


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

The Latest: Cyberattack 'under control' in US (AP) — The latest on the global extortion cyberattack that hit dozens of countries (all times local): Tom Bossert, a homeland security adviser to U.S. President Donald Trump, says the recent global cyberattack is something that "for right now, we've got under control" in the United States. Bossert tells ABC's "Good Morning America" that the malware is an "extremely serious threat" that could inspire copycat attacks. But Microsoft's security patch released in March should protect U.S. networks for those who install it. Micrsoft's top lawyer has criticized U.S. intelligence for "stockpiling" software code that can aid hackers. Cybersecurity experts say the unknown hackers behind the latest attacks used a vulnerability exposed in U.S. government documents leaked online. Bossert said "criminals" are responsible, not the U.S. government. Bossert says the U.S. hasn't ruled out involvement by a foreign government, but that the recent ransom demands suggest a criminal network. Indian authorities were on high alert for news of malfunctioning computers Monday, after experts estimated 5 percent of affected computers were in the country. The Computer Emergency Response Team of India issued a red-colored "critical alert" — it's highest alarm level — and urged computer users to update their systems and use protective software. But few major problems were reported. The head of the government response team told Press Trust of India news agency that "everything seems to be normal, so far. No reports have come in" detailing cyberattacks in the country. The Kaspersky Lab, a security solutions firm, had estimated that up to 5 percent of computers affected globally could be in India. The country is considered vulnerable thanks to a large number of computers running on older Microsoft operating systems. Britain's health service says most hospitals hit by the global "ransomware" attack are back up and running, but seven are still experiencing IT disruption and canceling appointments. About a fifth of NHS trusts — the regional bodies that run hospitals and clinics — were hit by the attack on Friday, leading to thousands of canceled appointments and operations. Health officials say seven of the 47 affected are still having IT problems and have asked for "extra support" from the National Health Service. Barts Health, which runs five London hospitals, says it is still sending some ambulances to other hospitals and has canceled some surgeries and outpatient appointments. Ciaran Martin, chief executive of the U.K.'s National Cyber Security Centre, has warned that more computers could be infected Monday as doctors' practices re-opened after the weekend. In France, auto manufacturer Renault said one of its plants, which employs 3,500 people in Douai, northern France, wasn't reopening Monday as technicians continued to deal with the aftermath of the global cyberattack. The company described the temporary halt in production as a "preventative step." The company gave no details on the degree to which the plant was affected by the malware. Renault said all of its other plants in France were open Monday. The problem with its home page wasn't ransomware after all, Osaka city hall said. The site is now back up but the real cause of the problem is not yet clear, said spokesman Hajime Nishikawa. Kyodo News said one personal computer was affected at one office at East Japan Railway Co., but train services were not affected. A Japanese nonprofit says computers at 600 locations had been hit in the global "ransomware" cyberattack. Nissan Motor Co. confirmed Monday some units had been targeted, but there was no major impact on its business. Hitachi spokeswoman Yuko Tainiuchi said emails were slow or not getting delivered, and files could not be opened. The company believes the problems are related to the ransomware attack, although no ransom is being demanded. They were installing software to fix the problems. The Japan Computer Emergency Response Team Coordination Center said 2,000 computers in Japan were reported affected so far, citing an affiliate foreign security organization that it cannot identify. At least one hospital was affected, according to police. The city of Osaka said its home page went blank, although problems had not been detected otherwise. South Korea has been mostly spared from the global cyber chaos that crippled scores of governments and companies in 150 countries. Director Shin Dae Kyu at the state-run Korea Internet & Security Agency who monitors the private sector said Monday that five companies have reported they were targeted by a global "ransomware" cyberattack. While some companies did not report damages to the government, South Korea was yet to see crippling damages, he said. The most public damage was on the country's largest movie chain. CJ CGV Co. was restoring its advertising servers at dozens of its movie theaters after the attack left the company unable to display trailers of upcoming movies. Its movie ticket systems were unaffected. Another government security official said no government systems were affected. Global cyber chaos is spreading Monday as companies boot up computers at work following the weekend's worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack. The extortion scheme has created chaos in 150 countries and could wreak even greater havoc as more malicious variations appear. The initial attack, known as "WannaCry," paralyzed computers running Britain's hospital network, Germany's national railway and scores of other companies and government agencies around the world. As a loose global network of cybersecurity experts fought the ransomware hackers, in China, state media said more than 29,000 institutions had been infected along with hundreds of thousands of devices. The Japan Computer Emergency Response Team Coordination Center, a nonprofit providing support for computer attacks, said 2,000 computers at 600 locations in Japan were reported affected so far.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.fastcompany.com

Fancy Bear may have stumbled in the French election but they’re still wreaking havoc across Western Europe. And despite the failure of what many suspect was their attempt to disrupt the victory of Emmanuel Macron’s political campaign, the infamous Russian hackers haven’t yet adapted their tactics, say cybersecurity experts. In France, Fancy Bear was suspected of hacking Macron’s email account, presumably in an attempt to boost right-wing candidate Marine Le Pen. The hack led to a massive dump of leaked documents just days before this month’s election, but it proved ineffective due to French resistance to fake news and social media and to the Macron campaign’s effective counterattack–reportedly setting up its own fake sites and accounts to confuse the hackers. But the group continues to pursue digital attacks across the world, in an effort to steal sensitive information and promote Russian interests through leak-based propaganda campaigns, experts say. “A lot of their activity goes pretty unnoticed in the West, because a lot of it focuses on Eastern Europe and Central Asia,” says John Hultquist, director of cyber-espionage analysis at security firm FireEye. The group has targeted political figures in Montenegro, for instance, as the Balkan country–once part of Soviet-aligned Yugoslavia–moves to join NATO. “Obviously that has repercussions for Russian influence in the area,” says Hultquist. Fancy Bear has also been active in Germany, hacking computers of the country’s parliament in 2015 and subsequently attacking Chancellor Angela Merkel’s party and reportedly sending phishing emails to affiliated political research organization earlier this year. Die Zeit, a respected German newspaper, warned earlier this month that “it is quite possible that emails from the chancellor will soon appear during the election campaign” leading up to a vote in September that will determine whether Merkel’s party continues to control the legislature. The group hasn’t been spotted to the same extent in the U.K., where elections are slated for June 8, though security firm SecureWorks reported earlier this year that Fancy Bear penetrated a network belonging an unnamed television network in the country in 2015 and 2016. Part of the reason for Fancy Bear’s relentlessness is due to the perception that their attacks go unpunished. Though the hackers suspected of hacking the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta’s email accounts inarguably impacted the election, leading to the victory of Russian president Vladimir Putin’s preferred candidate, they’ve paid a relatively small price for the attacks, says Chris Finan, cofounder and CEO of security startup Manifold Technology and a former White House cybersecurity advisor. “What consequences have the Russians paid for what they did in 2016? Hardly anything: a few new sanctions.” Fancy Bear, also dubbed APT-28 and Pawn Storm by various analysts, doesn’t focus only on the headline-grabbing, politically charged leak campaigns that typically make the news, he says. The group also pursues regular digital espionage campaigns against a variety of military, diplomatic, and government targets, looking for information of value to Russian intelligence that might never be released to the public.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

French parvenu’s triumph gives liberalism a good name. For Europe’s sake as well as France’s, his third way must work Paradigms shift as fast as headlines in the age of 24-hour news. With a stunning election victory snatched out of nowhere, Emmanuel Macron, the plausible parvenu, has suddenly patented a new model for inclusive democratic politics in Europe, and repulsed – for now at least – the forces of reaction and isolation typified by Donald Trump and Marine Le Pen. Macron’s triumph gives liberalism a good name. Its rehabilitation comes in the nick of time. For months, establishment politicians have skulked in Europe’s corridors of power, listening to a growing populist clamour from without. Like a modern-day mob raging at the gates of Versailles, neo-fascists, racists, ultra-nationalists and hard-left utopians laid siege to the self-appointed heirs of the Enlightenment. But these would-be revolutionary forces were not confined to the political fringe. In France, as in the US and Britain last year, the simmering anger of the mainstream’s left-behind, the economically dispossessed and the socially excluded could no longer be contained. The status quo had failed them. In working class heartlands, old loyalties broke and shattered. Their fury spilled over. They demanded change. It wasn’t just that the centre could not hold. The centre all but disappeared as Trump stormed the White House and a majority of British voters defenestrated the EU. All the subsequent talk was of a populist domino effect sweeping Europe, knocking over the Dutch, the French and even the Germans. Analysts predicted an end to the postwar social democratic order and a return to the age of the autocrat. In the US, Trump’s supporters hailed a “historic” watershed moment. It has not happened. Macron, it seems, has turned the tide. He stood up for progressive values even as he spoke the language of la patrie. Macron, the economic liberal, reasserted the primacy of open markets and open borders. He championed tolerance, rejected division. Macron, the outsider-insider, promised a change from the old paralysis of left and right – but not a bloody insurrection. And he broke the mould. Europe’s liberal counter-revolution began on Sunday. Macron’s success will be seen as a striking rejection of the xenophobia and racism of the Front National. It sets an encouraging example for Martin Schulz of Germany’s SPD, languishing in Angela Merkel’s lengthening shadow, and similar groupings such as Britain’s Liberal Democrats. It sends a sharp, deterrent message to the hard-right iconoclasts of Alternative für Deutschland that Europe’s mood is shifting. Macron’s fresh ideas and strong pro-Europe stance will be a tonic for the EU. Things were already looking up after a gloomy 2016. The eurozone economy is expanding faster than the US or Britain, Greece has dodged the bankruptcy bullet again, and Brexit – so far – has not been as disruptive as feared. In elections elsewhere, such as the Netherlands, extremists of left and right have also been rebuffed. Macron’s new ascendancy could re-energise the similarly youthful Matteo Renzi, a like-minded reformer now back in charge of Italy’s ruling Democratic party. If Macron can turn ideas into facts, he will find more willing emulators in Spain, Greece and other European countries whose discredited political systems, like France’s, have seized up like old gearboxes starved of oil. How Macron deals with Trump will be a telling test. But even Trump is not proving to be quite the nightmare that had kept many Europeans awake at night. His bark, at least so far, has been worse than his bite. The Nato alliance has been rebooted, not retired. Russia’s Vladimir Putin has not suddenly been excused his misdeeds in Ukraine and Syria – or claims of serial election hacking. Macron’s success may give heart to Americans despairing of a presidency forged in prejudice and fear. Trump was rooting for Le Pen. He all but endorsed her, calling her the “strongest” candidate. But wishing did not make it so. Like Putin, Le Pen is a Trump soulmate – but a soulmate without power who missed her moment. If he has any sense at all, Trump will catch Europe’s shifting winds. Given the alternative, maybe Macron’s win is no great surprise. Generally speaking the French have always seen themselves as a race apart. “Vive la difference” is no idle national slogan. And while France’s open society traditionally tolerates political extremes, the mass of French voters, however angry and alienated, were never going to thoughtlessly follow in the path of Britain’s self-harming Brexiters or Trump’s blue-collar battalions. By ditching the old parties and backing an untried interloper, France has taken what Disraeli called a leap in the dark. Like a born-again Tony Blair, Macron promises a third way. It’s a bold, hazardous step. Now, for Europe’s sake as well as France’s, he has to deliver.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

The dollar stabilises after better-than-expected US jobs data and European stock markets steady as investors hedge their bets ahead of the French presidential vote on Sunday (AFP Photo/Bryan R. Smith) Wall Street stocks rallied to fresh records Friday following a solid US jobs report, while European equities gained ahead of the final round of the French presidential election. The S&P 500 and Nasdaq each gained 0.4 percent to finish at fresh records. Besides the jobs report, stocks were boosted by a bounce in oil prices. After a slow March, when hiring likely was held down by a winter storm, the US economic engine added an estimated 211,000 net new positions in April while the jobless rate fell a tenth to 4.4 percent, the lowest since May 2007, the Labor Department reported. Analysts said the report further strengthens prospects the Federal Reserve will stick to a planned course of two more interest rate hikes in 2017. "Today's employment report should have brushed aside any concerns about the health of the US labor market that may have come up after the disappointing payroll number last month," said UniCredit analyst Harm Bandholz. European equities also had a good day, with Paris climbing 1.1 percent, Frankfurt 0.6 percent and London 0.7 percent. In France, centrist Emmanuel Macron sought to cement his frontrunner status on the last day of campaigning for the weekend's election run-off after a bruising and divisive race. At the end of a battle that has increased in intensity in the final days, Macron appears to be gaining momentum according to new polls which showed him winning around 62 percent to 38 percent if Sunday's vote were held today. The euro also took heart from the polls showing a clear Macron edge. "Fading political uncertainty in France should keep the euro generally well supported," said Omer Esiner, analyst at Commonwealth Foreign Exchange On the corporate front, British publisher Pearson sent its share price rocketing after the group launched a new cost-cutting plan and put its US schoolbooks division up for sale. Shares jumped 12.9 percent. Pearson, which has issued a series of profit warnings in recent years, will seek to slash costs by £300 million ($387 million, 354 million euros) on an annualized basis by the end of 2019. But IBM tumbled 2.5 percent after billionaire investor Warren Buffett revealed he has sold about a third of his stake and "revalued" downward the computing giant. New York - Dow: UP 0.3 percent at 21,006.94 (close) New York - S&P 500: UP 0.4 percent at 2,399.29 (close) New York - Nasdaq: UP 0.7 percent at 6,100.76 (close) Euro/dollar: UP at $1.0997 from $1.0984 Pound/dollar: UP at $1.2980 from $1.2922 Dollar/yen: UP at 112.80 yen from 112.56 yen Oil - Brent North Sea: UP 72 cents at $49.10 per barrel


An implementation of full self-consistency over the electronic density in the DFT+DMFT framework on the basis of a plane waveprojector augmented wave (PAW) DFT code is presented. It allows for an accurate calculation of the total energy in DFT+DMFT within a plane wave approach. In contrast to frameworks based on the maximally localized Wannier function, the method is easily applied to f electron systems, such as cerium, cerium oxide (Ce 2O 3) and plutonium oxide (Pu 2O 3). In order to have a correct and physical calculation of the energy terms, we find that the calculation of the self-consistent density is mandatory. The formalism is general and does not depend on the method used to solve the impurity model. Calculations are carried out within the Hubbard I approximation, which is fast to solve, and gives a good description of strongly correlated insulators. We compare the DFT+DMFT and DFT+U solutions, and underline the qualitative differences of their converged densities. We emphasize that in contrast to DFT+U, DFT+DMFT does not break the spin and orbital symmetry. As a consequence, DFT+DMFT implies, on top of a better physical description of correlated metals and insulators, a reduced occurrence of unphysical metastable solutions in correlated insulators in comparison to DFT+U. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Pellegrini Y.-P.,CEA DAM Ile-de-France
Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics | Year: 2014

A theoretical framework is proposed to derive a dynamic equation motion for rectilinear dislocations within isotropic continuum elastodynamics. The theory relies on a recent dynamic extension of the Peierls-Nabarro equation, so as to account for core-width generalized stacking-fault energy effects. The degrees of freedom of the solution of the latter equation are reduced by means of the collective-variable method, well known in soliton theory, which we reformulate in a way suitable to the problem at hand. Through these means, two coupled governing equations for the dislocation position and core width are obtained, which are combined into one single complex-valued equation of motion, of compact form. The latter equation embodies the history dependence of dislocation inertia. It is employed to investigate the motion of an edge dislocation under uniform time-dependent loading, with focus on the subsonic/transonic transition. Except in the steady-state supersonic range of velocities - which the equation does not address - our results are in good agreement with atomistic simulations on tungsten. In particular, we provide an explanation for the transition, showing that it is governed by a loading-dependent dynamic critical stress. The transition has the character of a delayed bifurcation. Moreover, various quantitative predictions are made, that could be tested in atomistic simulations. Overall, this work demonstrates the crucial role played by core-width variations in dynamic dislocation motion. © 2014 American Physical Society.


Soulard O.,CEA DAM Ile-de-France
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2012

The aim of this letter is to assess existing theories for Rayleigh-Taylor small turbulent scales. For this purpose, we propose to adapt the Monin-Yaglom relation to the Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence context. A special emphasis is put on the inhomogeneity of the flow and on the effect of buoyancy forces. This relation is then used to show that, among existing theories, the standard Kolmogorov-Obukhov theory should apply to Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence in the limit of a large Reynolds number, large times, and small scales. © 2012 American Physical Society.

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