CDC
Atlanta, GA, United States
CDC
Atlanta, GA, United States

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | March 30, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Two Yale students have addressed the very common problem of hangovers and created a remedy based on the chemical reactions that take place in the human body when drinking. The anti-hangover formula is called SunUp. The supplement is entirely natural and it comes in a powder form that consumers have to dissolve in water before drinking. It has a citrus taste, which makes it easier to administer. However, people should drink it before the crazy night out. Margaret Morse, a molecular, cellular, and developmental biology Major at Yale and Liam McClintock, a D1 athlete involved in the Greek life at Yale are the scientists who developed the product. The ingredients work together to break down toxic molecules in the liver, balancing the glutamine levels and arming the body with electrolytes. This all-in-one formula provides people who enjoy drinking with the necessary uplift to prevent a hangover. According to the two creators of the hangover remedy, their efforts were divided into a two-step process. The first step involved learning about the physiological effects that alcohol has on the body and reading all of the scientific literature on what causes the symptoms of hangover. The second step was to find compounds and nutrients that have been proven effective in combatting processes that lead to hangovers. "Although scientists are still trying to fully understand hangovers, there are four main contributors that have been identified by scientific research: acetaldehyde buildup, glutamine rebound, immunologic disturbances, and vitamin and electrolyte loss," notes the researchers' paper. The students' campaign is seeking $20,000 and has already secured $18,393 — more than 90 percent of the target fund. For a $5 pledge, every consumer will receive one packet of SunUp. The product will ship April 2017. Its ingredients have each been tested individually in independent studies, which prove their capability of improving alcohol clearance, as well as active defense against alcohol toxicity. SunUp adds extra vitamins and electrolytes to the body, which eliminates the poignant feeling of fatigue that follows every night out. The product breaks down the acetaldehyde molecule, which is 30 times more toxic to the body than alcohol itself. "We are passionate about ending hangovers and increasing productivity. This project aims to launch our patent-pending anti-hangover formula, making it available for retail with professional packaging and flavoring," notes the Indiegogo page of the project. Hangovers cost the United States approximately $223.5 in 2006, or approximately $1.9 per drink, according to data provided by the CDC. The costs resulted from a different series of factors. The most important and expensive one is workplace productivity dropping because of excessive alcohol consumption, which accounted for 72 percent of the total cost. Health care expenses were responsible for 11 percent of the total costs, while law enforcement and criminal justice expenses cost the American state 9 percent of the more than $223 billion. Last, but not least, motor vehicle crashes costs accounted for 6 percent of the total amount. Additionally, binge drinking was reported by 18 percent of the adults in the United States. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Research from Drexel University and the University of Pittsburgh suggests that guidelines for safe disposal of liquid waste from patients being treated for the Ebola virus might not go far enough to protect water treatment workers from being exposed. In a study recently published in the journal Water Environment Research, a group of environmental engineering researchers reports that sewer workers downstream of hospitals and treatment centers could contract Ebola via inhalation -- a risk that is not currently accounted for in the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention or World Health Organization Ebola response protocol. The study, "Risks from Ebolavirus Discharge From Hospitals to Sewer Workers," authored by Charles Haas, PhD, LD Betz professor in Drexel's College of Engineering and head of the Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering Department; and Leonard Casson, PhD, and Kyle Bibby, PhD, from Pitt's Swanson School of Engineering, takes the first steps toward understanding the risk that this untreated waste poses to the people in the water treatment process who work in close proximity to it. "During the 2014-16 Ebola outbreak we had our first case of Ebola treated in the U.S. and by the end 11 individuals had been treated here--so this is certainly an area of risk assessment that we need to examine more closely," Haas said. Initial guidelines issued by the WHO during the outbreak suggested that liquid waste generated by individuals being treated for Ebola could be disposed of via sanitary sewer or pit latrine without additional treatment. Months later it issued more conservative guidelines that suggested containing the waste in a holding tank before releasing it into the water treatment system. But according to the researchers, neither of these advisories accounted for risk to the sewer workers. "While current WHO and CDC guidance for disposal of liquid waste from patients undergoing treatment for Ebola virus disease at hospitals in the U.S. is to manage patient excreta as ordinary wastewater without pretreatment. The potential for Ebolavirus transmission via liquid waste discharged into the wastewater environment is currently unknown," the authors write. "Possible worker inhalation exposure to Ebolavirus-contaminated aerosols in the sewer continues to be a concern within the wastewater treatment community." The team arrived at its conclusions by first talking to workers at urban wastewater treatment facilities to understand where and under what conditions they might come in contact with untreated sewage aerosols. The researchers then looked at previous Ebola data to create a model of its behavior under similar conditions -- from which they conducted a standardized microbial risk assessment analysis that was developed by Haas. It took into account variables such as the amount of waste produced during a treatment period, the degree to which it is diluted, the length of time between its disposal at the hospital and when sewer workers would encounter it and the concentration of viable viruses that could be in the air at treatment facilities. A worker's risk of exposure varies with the time spent in the contaminated area and whether or not they're wearing properly fitting protective gear -- so the team looked at what the exposure risk would be given a range of protection and viral particle concentration scenarios. "Under the least-favorable scenario, the potential risk of developing Ebola virus disease from inhalation exposure is a value higher than many risk managers may be willing to accept," they report. "Although further data gathering efforts are necessary to improve the prevision of the risk projections, the results suggest that the potential risk that sewer workers face when operating in a wastewater collection system downstream from a hospital receiving Ebola patients warrants further attention and current authoritative guidance for Ebolavirus liquid waste disposal may be insufficiently protective of sewer worker safety." While this study suggests that new guidelines from the leading public health authorities are likely in order, the researchers acknowledge that their work is part of the iterative process of understanding how to safely contain and treat the virus. This study builds on Haas and Bibby's previous work, which has shaped the way experts understand Ebola risk. Their research on how long Ebola can survive outside the body raised important questions about how exposure can occur and how long patients should be quarantined. "We find this area of risk assessment to be particularly vital because of the preponderance of questions that remain about how long Ebolavirus can survive outside the body," Haas said. "One thing we do know from previous research is that it is possible to inhale the virus to cause a risk -- and it wouldn't take much. At this point we haven't seen a confirmed case of somebody contracting Ebola in this way, and our hope is that this work can contribute to revised guidelines that will keep it that way."


For years, health experts have bemoaned the rise of childhood obesity in the United States. About 17% of kids and teens in the U.S. are now considered obese, a figure that has more than tripled since the 1970s, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A report in this week’s edition of the New England Journal of Medicine lays out one of the consequences of all this excess weight: a corresponding increase in childhood cases of type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes occurs when extra body fat makes it hard for cells to use insulin, a hormone that turns sugar into energy. Over time, blood sugar levels rise and cause blood vessels to become stiff, increasing the risk of life-threatening conditions like heart attacks, strokes and kidney failure, among others. More than 75,000 Americans die of diabetes each year, the CDC says. Type 2 diabetes used to be called adult-onset diabetes, because it would take years to develop. (That’s in contrast to type 1 diabetes, formerly known as juvenile diabetes, which occurs when the immune system destroys the cells that make insulin.) But these days, doctors are diagnosing type 2 in school-age kids, and occasionally even in toddlers. After reviewing data on 10- to 19-year-olds in primarily five states (California, Colorado, Ohio, South Carolina and Washington), researchers determined that 12.5 out of every 100,000 of them had a bona fide case of type 2 diabetes in 2011 and 2012. That compares with nine cases per 100,000 youth in 2002 and 2003. After accounting for age, gender, race and ethnicity, the study authors found that the incidence of type 2 diabetes in this age group rose by an average of 4.8% per year during the study period. The increase is detailed in this chart, which comes from the CDC. Here are five take-aways from the new data. Although the difference between nine cases and 12.5 cases per 100,000 people might not sound like much, it means that about 1,500 more kids and teens were being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes each year at the end of the study period compared with the beginning. The incidence of type 2 diabetes rose pretty much across the board for 10- to 19-year-olds, regardless of age, gender, race or ethnicity. The two exceptions were white kids and youth in Ohio. The burden of all these extra cases of type 2 diabetes is not being shared equally. The racial and ethnic gap was evident in 2003, when the incidences ranged from 4.4 cases per 100,000 people for white youth to 22.6 cases per 100,000 people for Native Americans. By 2012, whites still had the lowest incidence and Native Americans still had the highest, but the gap had increased from 3.9 to 46.5 cases per 100,000 people. In between were Asian American youth (with 12.2 cases per 100,000), Latinos (18.2 cases per 100,000) and African Americans (32.6 cases per 100,000). Not only did white kids and teens start out with the lowest incidence of type 2 diabetes, they were the only demographic that didn’t experience an increase in incidence over the 10 years of the study. At the beginning of the study period, the incidence of type 2 diabetes was seven cases per 100,000 boys and 11.1 cases per 100,000 girls. By the end, the incidence increased modestly for boys (to nine cases per 100,000) but more markedly for girls (to 16.2 cases per 100,000). After the researchers accounted for demographic factors, they calculated that the annual increase in type 2 diabetes incidence was 3.7% for boys and 6.2% for girls. When the researchers divided the data according to age, they found very little difference between 10- to 14-year-olds and 15- to 19-year-olds. In 2003, the older teens had a slight edge, with an incidence of 10 cases per 100,000 people compared with eight cases per 100,000 for their younger counterparts. By 2012, that edge had narrowed to 12.9 cases per 100,000 to 12.1 cases per 100,000. The adjusted annual increase was essentially the same for both age groups — 5.2% for the older kids and 5.1% for the younger ones. The earlier the disease starts, the more potential it has to do damage. Globally, the number of years people lived with diabetes-related disabilities rose by nearly 33% between 2005 and 2015, according to a report published last year in Lancet. In addition, the number of years of life lost to type 2 diabetes rose more than 25% in the same period. That means that even though doctors are doing a better job of treating diabetes and its related conditions, “the overall adverse effect of diabetes on public health is actually increasing,” according to an editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine that accompanies the new report. Follow me on Twitter @LATkarenkaplan and "like" Los Angeles Times Science & Health on Facebook. What would make a computer biased? Learning a language spoken by humans Saturn's moon Enceladus might have the right elements to sustain Earth-like life Your fitness tracker can count your steps, but it's not that good at monitoring your heart rate


Oakbrook Terrace, Ill. (April 24, 2017) -- Though transmission of malaria was wiped out in the United States decades ago and infections are falling in parts of the developing world, malaria hospitalizations and deaths in the U.S. appear to be far more common than generally appreciated as a steady stream of travelers returns home with the dangerous mosquito-borne disease. That's the key finding from a new study published today in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene that shows malaria led to a count of hospitalized patients and deaths that easily eclipsed other travel-related illness and generated about half a billion dollars in healthcare costs in the U.S. over a 15-year period. "It appears more and more Americans are traveling to areas where malaria is common and many of them are not taking preventive measures, such as using anti-malarial preventive medications and mosquito repellents, even though they are very effective at preventing infections," said Diana Khuu, PhD, MPH, a scientist at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the lead author of the study, which included contributions from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Khuu and her colleagues looked for malaria patients in a database maintained by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) that tracks hospital admissions nationwide. The researchers found that between 2000 and 2014, about 22,000 people were admitted to U.S. hospitals due to complications from malaria. Moreover, 4,823 patients were diagnosed with severe malaria, which means they suffered from problems like renal failure, coma or acute respiratory distress that significantly increase the risk of death, and 182 of these patients died. The study showed that malaria hospitalizations were more common in the U.S. than hospitalizations for many other travel-associated diseases. For example, during the same period, dengue fever, which is common in Mexico, Puerto Rico, and throughout Latin America, and has caused small, local outbreaks in south Florida and Texas, generated, on average, 259 hospitalizations a year compared with 1,489 for malaria. According to the study, malaria hospitalizations are quite common in the U.S., and the associated burden from these cases is substantial. The researchers found that the average cost per patient was about $25,800 and that the total bill for treating malaria patients in the U.S. from 2000 to 2014 was about $555 million. Overall, the scientists estimated that each year there are about 2,100 people in the U.S. suffering from malaria, since about 69 percent require hospital treatment. That case count would exceed the high end of the official CDC estimate of 1,500 to 2,000 cases per year. Khuu attributed the difference to the fact that CDC's malaria count is based on reports submitted to the agency by hospitals or physicians, and hospital admission records that were used in her study may capture additional cases that have not been reported to CDC. While those admissions' records did not include travel history, the researchers believe the malaria infections they documented most likely were acquired during travel to parts of Africa, Asia, and Latin America, where malaria is still common. Over the last 15 years a blitz of malaria interventions that include insecticide-treated bednets and increased access to highly effective malaria drugs has been accompanied by an estimated 37 percent drop in malaria incidence and a 60 percent drop in malaria deaths globally. Meanwhile, although malaria was eliminated from the U.S. in the 1950s, there are sporadic reports of locally-acquired malaria infections, presumably caused by a mosquito that either fed on an infected traveler or hitched a ride on a flight or ship coming from a malaria-endemic region. But Khuu noted that mosquitoes capable of carrying malaria are common in many parts of the U.S., and that increases in the number of travelers coming home with the disease increases the risk of malaria re-establishing itself in the U.S. According to the study, the majority of malaria hospitalizations occurred in the eastern U.S. in states along the Atlantic seaboard. Malaria's last domestic stronghold was in the Southeast. Also, the study found that men accounted for 60 percent of the malaria-related hospital admissions. The researchers believe the overrepresentation of males in the U.S. malaria count may indicate that men are less likely to seek travel advice or, when they do, less likely to adhere to recommendations for preventing infections, like taking an anti-malarial preventive medication and using a mosquito repellent. The researchers noted that most of the deaths and severe disease appeared to be linked to infections with the malaria parasite known as Plasmodium falciparum, which is responsible for the vast majority of malaria deaths and severe disease worldwide. But the study found that in almost half of the malaria-related hospitalizations there was no indication of parasite type, though Khuu pointed out that information can be obtained via a relatively simple blood test. Khuu noted that identifying the parasite causing the infection can be crucial for determining treatment and prognosis. For example, patients sickened by the P. vivax and P. ovale parasites can appear to be fully recovered. But unlike the case with P. falciparum malaria, the P. vivax and P. ovale parasites can enter a dormant stage and then, after treatment, re-emerge to cause a relapse of the disease. According to the CDC, preventing relapse requires both treating the acute infection and, in addition, a course of a drug called primaquine. "Hospitalizations in the United States from malaria remind us that we live in an interconnected world," said ASTMH President Patricia F. Walker, MD, DTM&H, FASTMH. "For this reason, the U.S. must continue to invest in tropical medicine research efforts and programs, even for diseases like malaria that we don't think of as American diseases. To get the job done, we need a strong NIH a strong CDC, and commitment to military research." About the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, founded in 1903, is the largest international scientific organization of experts dedicated to reducing the worldwide burden of tropical infectious diseases and improving global health. It accomplishes this through generating and sharing scientific evidence, informing health policies and practices, fostering career development, recognizing excellence, and advocating for investment in tropical medicine/global health research. For more information, visit astmh.org. About the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Continuously published since 1921, AJTMH is the peer-reviewed journal of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, and the world's leading voice in the fields of tropical medicine and global health. AJTMH disseminates new knowledge in fundamental, translational, clinical and public health sciences focusing on improving global health.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Dublin, May 01, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global Hospital Infection Prevention And Control Market Size, Market Share, Application Analysis, Regional Outlook, Growth Trends, Key Players, Competitive Strategies and Forecasts, 2013 to 2024" report to their offering. The global hospital infection prevention and control market was valued at US$ 142.6 Mn in 2015, and is expected to reach US$ 245.6 Mn by 2024, expanding at a CAGR of 6.3% from 2016 to 2024. The market experts suggest that healthcare associated infections are a costly issue faced by many hospitals across the globe. Hospital acquired infections are type of infections that are observed in patients during the course of receiving treatment for unrelated conditions. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), infectious waste contributes in this way to the risk of nosocomial infections, putting the health of hospital personnel, and patients, at risk. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) statistically suggested that, with approximately 300,000 occurrences each year, surgical site infections (SSIs) are the second most prevalent HAI in the United States, preceded only by urinary tract infections. At a cost of approximately US$ 10 Bn annually, this high incidence of SSIs significantly impacts the U.S. healthcare system, as well as the bottom line of individual hospitals. The occurrence of nosocomial infections has been observed worldwide in both developed and resource-poor countries. Key factors assisting the growth of hospital infections prevention and control market are rising prevalence of infections, implementation of stringent guidelines associated with hospital infection prevention and control, developing healthcare infrastructure in emerging countries, and rising number of hospitals across the world. The global hospital infection prevention and control market is segmented by infection type as pneumonia, urinary tract infection, blood stream infection, surgical site infection, MRSA and others. These are the major types of hospital acquired infections that find the highest prevalence. As sourced from the CDC, ventilator associated pneumonia and surgical site infection are the most common conditions followed by GI infection, UTI, and primary blood stream infection. Global Hospital Infection Prevention and Control Market are segmented by Product type as Infection Prevention Supplies, Infection Prevention Equipment and Infection Prevention Services. Infection prevention supplies held the largest share in the overall hospital infection prevention and control market. Based on the therapeutic application type, the global hospital infection prevention and control market is segmented as follows: Infection Prevention Supplies: For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/zkgjh8/global_hospital


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

Mold can strike any home in any climate. It's important for homeowners and renters to know the dangers of mold, how to test for mold, and how to safely remove it from a home according to Healthful Home Products. ​​​​​​​​​​Mold problems can strike any home in any climate. Household mold poses a serious health hazard, especially for children, the elderly and those with compromised immune systems. That’s why it’s important for renters and homeowners to be aware of mold risks, how to test for mold, and how to safely remove mold once it’s found. Mold is a broad term for certain kinds of fungi that grow in damp places. In closed, humid environments, mold thrives and quickly spreads. As it grows, mold releases millions of tiny spores into the air, and these spores can be harmful if breathed in. While no mold is deemed safe, over 30 identified species of indoor mold are identified as toxic, wreaking havoc on the body’s cells—particularly in the lungs, throat and sinuses. Mold exposure has been linked to asthma, allergic reactions, nervous-system disorders, and chronic sinusitis. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), mold exposure can also lead to skin, throat and eye irritation, and it can interfere with the body’s ability to fight off diseases. For sensitive individuals, even small amounts of mold exposure can trigger serious health problems, sometimes requiring hospitalization. "A National Center for Healthy Housing study revealed that 35 million homes in the U.S. have mold and other indoor air quality issues," said Ron Herrmann, National Sales Manager for Healthful Home Products. "To be safe, everyone should test for mold at least once a year with the 5-minute Mold Mold Test." Causes and Signs of Mold Widespread mold problems make headlines in hurricane-prone areas, but they can strike in drier regions, too. Common causes of mold include sewage backup, cracked or broken water pipes, flood damage, water damage from a leaky roof, and poor ventilation in bathrooms, laundry rooms and basements Sometimes mold is easy to spot. Usually, however, mold lurks in hard-to-see places such as behind drywall, in the seams of cabinets, or under the fridge. Common signs of mold in the home include: A mold test is required to determine if toxic mold is present in a home. Until recently, do-it-yourself mold test kits needed to be sent to a lab (often requiring an extra fee), and results were not available for weeks. Fortunately, a new mold test called 5-Minute Mold Test Kit from Healthful Home displays results in minutes. Using a small sample of household dust from the floor, cabinet or other surface, this test kit can detect the presence of over 32 different types of harmful mold spores including black molds (while ignoring harmless molds like mildew). The 5-Minute Mold Test Kit is the only fast-acting DIY mold test kit on the market, and it has been licensed by the CDC. The kit lists for $44.99. After harmful mold has been detected, it’s possible to clean up many mold problems without the help of a professional. For localized mold issues, Healthful Home’s eco-friendly Mold and Bacteria Cleaner starts killing mold right away, and the mold-fighting effects can last for up to 6 months. It’s odorless, safe to use around children and pets, and 100% biodegradable. The product lists for $21.99. For a more widespread mold problem, Fog-U Mold is a fast and extremely effective way to treat an entire room. Like the Mold and Bacteria Cleaner, it contains the same all-natural ingredients and keeps working for months. It’s ideal for hard-to-reach places like crawl spaces and ventilation systems, and it even treats carpets and upholstery. The product lists for $21.99. All Healthful Home products can be found exclusively at Ace Hardware. For more information, visit www.myhealthfulhome.com. Once mold is identified, don’t forget that it is important to fix the source of the problem--whether it’s a poorly ventilated laundry room or bad water damage. Once the problem is fixed, improve air circulation and reduce indoor humidity to make sure the mold doesn’t have a chance to come back. Editors, writers and bloggers are invited to visit www.homegardenandhomestead.com for additional information and photos.


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global Dialyzer Market 2017-2021" report to their offering. The global dialyzer market to grow at a CAGR of 5.98% during the period 2017-2021. The report, Global Dialyzer Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. The report covers the market landscape and its growth prospects over the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the key vendors operating in this market. The latest trend gaining momentum in the market is growing preference toward home dialysis. Home dialysis has been growing in popularity owing to its increased benefits over conventional treatment. For instance, home dialysis reduces the number of hospital visits, and the individual has more flexibility in terms of treatment timelines. In addition, HD shows significant success rates than in-center HD. Therefore, vendors are increasingly conducting R&D to develop advanced home dialysis devices. According to the report, one of the major drivers for this market is growing prevalence of renal disorder. The growing incidence of chronic kidney diseases such as ESRD and renal diseases is expected to drive the market growth. For instance, according to CDC estimates, in 2014, more than 10% of adults in the US were suffering from chronic kidney diseases. The major reasons for the cause of chronic kidney disorders are diabetes and hypertension. For instance, globally, 50% of the dialysis patient population is from countries such as the US, China, Japan, Brazil, and Mexico. For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/6t6v7j/global_dialyzer


The global radiofrequency ablation market to grow at a CAGR of 8.78% during the period 2017-2021. The report, Global Radiofrequency Ablation Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. The report covers the market landscape and its growth prospects over the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the Key vendors operating in this market. The latest trend gaining momentum in the market is new product launches coupled with R&D activities. Vendors are increasingly focusing on the development and launch of new radiofrequency ablation devices. Product launches and R&D activities will help vendors survive in the market and enhance their growth. Vendors such as Medtronic, Boston Scientific, AngioDynamics, and Merit Medical Systems are actively involved in the development of innovative devices for improving the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation procedures. According to the report, one of the major drivers for this market is increasing incidence of chronic disorders and growing older population. A sedentary lifestyle can negatively affect the homeostasis of the body. The dietary habits of people worldwide are changing, which make them susceptible to many disorders such as cardiovascular diseases, respiratory diseases, obesity, cancer, urology disorders, joint pain, Alzheimer's disease, and other chronic illnesses. According to the CDC data, the number of people with chronic disorders has been increasing steadily over the past two decades. So, the emphasis and focus on treatments for these diseases such as radiofrequency ablation have increased. Radiofrequency ablation devices are increasingly used to treat chest pain, joint pain, gynecological conditions, and liver and kidney problems. Key Topics Covered: PART 01: Executive summary PART 02: Scope of the report PART 03: Research Methodology PART 04: Introduction PART 05: Market landscape PART 06: Market segmentation by product PART 07: Market segmentation by application PART 08: Market segmentation by end-user PART 09: Geographical segmentation PART 10: Decision framework PART 11: Drivers and challenges PART 12: Market trends PART 13: Vendor landscape PART 14: Key vendor analysis PART 15: Appendix For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/vz2zsr/global To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/research-and-markets---global-radiofrequency-ablation-market-to-grow-at-a-cagr-of-878-2017-2021-with-angiodynamics-boston-scientific-medtronic-st-jude-medical--stryker-dominating-300446264.html


News Article | April 29, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Saturday, April 29, marks World Veterinary Day, a time to celebrate the profession and recognize the positive impact veterinarians have on animal health and welfare as well as on public health. The World Veterinary Association (WVA) and the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) choose a theme each year and this year have selected “Antimicrobial Resistance—From Awareness to Action,” which emphasizes the important role veterinarians play in regulating and monitoring the use of antimicrobial agents, providing professional advice to animal owners and collaborating with the human health sector. Antimicrobial drugs have transformed the practice of human and animal medicine with their availability and popular use. Antimicrobial agents treat infections that were once deadly, advancing not only global health but also animal health. These life-saving medications support animal welfare, safety and food security. However, because these drugs have been overused and misused in the human, animal and plant sectors, they are losing effectiveness and facilitating the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. “If bacteria become resistant to antibiotics, we will have lost our most important method of treating illnesses in animals and humans,” said Texas Veterinary Medical Association (TVMA) member and public health veterinarian James Wright, DVM, MPVM, former chairman of the One Health Committee. “Both humans and animals will be somewhat defenseless against bacterial diseases." The human-animal relationship is closely linked. Drug-resistant bacteria can spread from animals to humans by human consumption of meat not handled or cooked properly. Humans also can encounter and host drug-resistant bacteria when eating vegetables that were nourished with fertilizer or water containing animal feces and drug-resistant bacteria. For humans, antibacterial resistance could mean additional visits to the doctor and prolonged suffering as well as serious disabilities and even death, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Veterinarians and veterinary paraprofessionals help fight antimicrobial resistance by supervising the use of antimicrobial drugs, offering advice to farmers and animal owners and fostering transparent communication with the human health sector. TVMA member Diane Hartman, DVM, Chairman of the One Health Committee, advises animal owners to administer antibiotics as directed for the full course of therapy and not use it to treat viral illnesses. “Veterinarians can use antibiotics to treat only illnesses that have a high probability of being caused by susceptible bacteria,” Wright said. “They need to use them in the correct dosages and for the proper duration of treatment.” The U.S. Federal Drug Administration (FDA) also is taking steps to fight antimicrobial resistance in the animal health sector. The government agency recently passed a rule that requires a directive by a veterinarian to include antibiotic treatment in livestock feed, also known as the Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD). The FDA also no longer allows the use of antibiotics in animal feeds for growth promotion or feed efficiency. WVA and OIE will bestow a World Veterinary Day Award to the veterinary association that is the most successful at promoting “Antimicrobial Resistance—From Awareness to Action” at the Opening Ceremony of the OIE 85th General Session in Paris, France, on May 21. The award will be presented at the World Veterinary Congress 2017 in Incheon, Korea, on August 27-31. Animal owners can learn more about public and animal health topics by visiting TexVetPets.org, TVMA’s veterinarian-written and peer-reviewed pet health information website. TexVetPets.org offers veterinarians an opportunity to educate the public on animal health issues and how they intersect with the health and welfare of humans and the environment. About the Texas Veterinary Medical Association Founded in 1903, the Texas Veterinary Medical Association is a professional association composed of more than 3,700 veterinarians committed to protecting public health, promoting high educational, ethical and moral standards within the veterinary profession and educating the public about animal health and its relationship to human health. For more information, call 512/452-4224 or visit http://www.tvma.org.

Loading CDC collaborators
Loading CDC collaborators