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News Article | February 26, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Zika Virus - What You Should Know Flu season is in full swing. With flu-related cases continue to rise, health officials have to contend the apprehension that the flu vaccine is less effective as a form of protection against the illness. This year's flu virus is prevalent in at least 43 states. Idaho, Missouri, and Illinois are reeling from the virus and some parts of the south and east coast. So far, Idaho reported 47 flu-related deaths, considered the most severe since 2000. With the uptick of flu cases, the question on the effectiveness of the flu shots people are getting is also rising. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the flu vaccine is 48 percent effective against the most common strain of influenza. It is even lesser, only 21 percent, effective for people aged 18 to 49. There is a brighter side though: The vaccine is 73 percent efficient to combat B strain. Unfortunately, this is not the kind of strain in this flu season. Identified as most vulnerable to the illness are children under age 5, pregnant women, and the elderly. Annualy, around 200,000 people in the U.S. are hospitalized while some 36,000 died due to the illness. The 2017 most common strain is Influenza AH3, considered more serious than the normal strain. Health officials claim this year's vaccine is up to the challenge of AH3. The vaccine's formulation has been adjusted and enhanced in anticipation to the most common strain every year. The current vaccine is tweaked to include protection against H3N2, but the prolificacy of this kind of virus to evolve in too short a time makes it difficult for drug makers to pin it down. About 600 variations of this year's virus have been identified by scientists. The problem is not with the vaccine. It is with the number of people who get vaccinated. CDC said less than half of the Americans got the shot. The flu season is far from over. Dr. Leslie Tengelsen, Idaho's state flu surveillance coordinator, urged the people to get the shot to get the protection they need from the illness. Far from being perfect but 48 percent is "actually pretty good," pediatric infectious diseases expert Peter Wenger at St. Peter's University Hospital in New Brunswick said. Despite its less than half efficiency, the vaccine could help weaken the virus resulting to milder cases of influenza. For those who waited for the perfect flu shot before they get vaccinated, here is a piece of advice: Don't leave your house . © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.reuters.com

(Reuters) - The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Friday it is reviewing the use of air hoses attached to protective suits worn in its Biosafety Level-4 labs.


News Article | February 14, 2017
Site: www.sciencenews.org

Traces of Zika virus typically linger in semen no longer than three months after symptoms show up, a new study on the virus’ staying power in bodily fluids reveals. Medical epidemiologist Gabriela Paz-Bailey of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and colleagues analyzed the bodily fluids — including blood, urine and saliva — of 150 people infected with Zika. In 95 percent of participants, Zika RNA was no longer detectable in urine after 39 days, and in blood after 54 days, researchers report February 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine. (People infected with dengue virus, in contrast, typically clear virus from the blood within 10 days, the authors note.) Although the CDC recommends that men exposed to Zika wait at least six months before having sex without condoms, researchers found that, for most men in the study, Zika RNA disappeared from semen by 81 days. Few people had traces of RNA in the saliva or in vaginal secretions. Most Zika infections transmitted sexually have been from men to women, but scientists have reported at least one female-to-male case.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 2016), report one in four Americans have more than two chronic conditions or multiple chronic conditions (MCC) and 93% of Medicare funding is spent on patients with MCC’s. Symptomatic MCCs require the integration of palliative care – or symptom management. Palliative care promotes a comprehensive, coordinated, interdisciplinary and evidence based approach to meet the individual needs of the patient and family. Effective symptom management with attention to the emotional, social and spiritual needs of the patient promote quality of life. The Integration of Palliative Care in Chronic Conditions: An Interdisciplinary Approach, provides all health care professionals with the tools to meet the demands of the largest, fastest growing and costliest US patient population – those with MCCs. This textbook reviews the current trends in health policy and practice and directs health care teams on the implementation of best practices. Optimal patient-centered outcomes are used to demonstrate quality in our value-driven health care system. “The purpose of Integration of Palliative Care in Chronic Conditions: An Interdisciplinary Approach is to provide interdisciplinary healthcare teams with a road map to ensure best practices in the care and management of the largest, fastest growing, and costliest US patient population – those with multiple chronic conditions,” says Dr. Kim Kuebler, Director of the Multiple Chronic Conditions Resource Center. About Dr. Kim Kuebler and Multiple Chronic Conditions: Dr. Kim Kuebler is the Director of the Multiple Chronic Conditions Resource Center and is an award-winning author of multiple textbooks covering chronic symptomatic disease and palliative care. She has made extensive contributions to the literature and participates in editorial peer review for several medical and nursing journals. Multiple Chronic Conditions Resource Center is an interdisciplinary source for clinical practice updates, guidelines, blogs, and courses used to support best practices in the care and management of America's largest patient population - those with two or more chronic conditions. The Center is recognized by the US Department of Health and Human Services as a clinical resource for interdisciplinary health care professional's providing care for patients with Multiple Chronic Conditions. Please visit multiplechronicconditions.org or email DrKimKuebler(at)MultipleChronicConditions(dot)org.


News Article | February 8, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Are you in your twenties? Did you know that you could be suffering from hearing impairment? The eye-popping fact may force you to sit up and take notice. According to a new report by the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), almost 20 percent of the American population, which is in their twenties, is suffering from hearing loss issues. Alarmingly, 53 percent of the hearing issues being faced by Americans is the result of day-to-day activities at home or work, which one takes for granted. "About 20 million American adults have hearing damage indicative of noise exposure that probably comes from everyday activities in their home and community," notes Dr.Anne Schuchat, the acting director at CDC In a bid to find out if everyday noise was contributing to unsuspected hearing loss, the CDC analyzed more than 3,500 hearing test samples. These were gathered from adult participants who contributed in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of 2012 Based on the data collected by the CDC, around 24 percent of the people in the age bracket of 20 years to 69 years are estimated to suffer from hearing impairment issues. Nearly 20 percent adults who are not exposed to loud noises in their work environment are also reported to be suffering from hearing impairment. The surprising thing is that most of the people diagnosed with hearing impairment are not aware of the fact that they suffer from the condition. Hearing loss is number three in the most commonly reported health conditions in the U.S. Hearing damages are mostly caused by daily activities that one indulges in. The regular sound of lawnmowers, leaf blowers, woodworking saws and other household machinery cause hearing damage. In addition to these, hearing loud music via a headphone or earphone, attending loud music concerts or the constant pounding of music, traffic noises, live sporting events, sirens from different vehicles are also said to cause hearing damage. According to the CDC, The traffic blares experienced while sitting in a car is 80 decibels, a leaf blower operates at 90 decibels and a live sporting event and rock concert produce 100 and 110 decibels of noise, respectively. Exposure to such high decibels for a minimum of 14 minutes is sufficient to cause hearing damage. The CDC recommends that every individual should go for a regular or monthly hearing checkup to keep that damage at bay. The agency also advises people to avoid noisy places as much as possible and use ear plugs, ear muffs to cancel out noise. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Ticked Off! Here's What You Need To Know About Lyme Disease Louisville it seems is the latest U.S. city to fall in the trap of a drug epidemic and cases of drug overdose are on a rise. Louisville's Metro Emergency Services received an alarming 52 overdose calls in a matter of 32 hours. The calls came from around more than 20 zip code areas. Though no reports of deaths due to the overdose were reported, around 34 people were hospitalized and were treated with naloxone, which is known to lower the risk due to drug overdose. Louisville Metro Emergency Services spokesperson Mitchell Burmeister stated that the rise in drug overdose cases was a result of the availability of heroin and the mixing of synthetic opioid fentanyl in batches. Apparently, the drug fentanyl, which was also responsible for the death of singer Prince, is 50 times stronger than heroin and 100 times stronger than morphine. Fentanyl was originally meant for cancer patients or for those who were to undergo any surgery. However, in recent years, the availability of this drug became so easy that getting hold of it was not much of a problem. It is a very powerful drug and even doctors prescribe it in microgram doses and not the full tablet. Coming to opioids, these drugs are also highly addictive and its addiction can make the person go to any extent to obtain them. Drugs or opium overdose has also spread to several places like Ohio's Montgomery county, which experienced around 145 deaths due to drug overdose, out of which 14 were considered to be fatal cases. Per the reports, in January, around 695 overdose cases were said to have been reported to the Louisville Metro Emergency Services, which is on an average at least 22 per day. "What generally is going on when you see this is someone has introduced a batch of fentanyl in the illicit drug supply that hasn't been cut sufficiently. I'm afraid it's a reality we're going to see repeated far too often," says, Van Ingram, the executive Director of Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy. According to Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there has been a spike in death rates by 72.2 percent due to synthetic opioids. "Today, at least half of all U.S. opioid overdose deaths involve a prescription opioid. In 2014, more than 14,000 people died from overdoses involving prescription opioid," states CDC. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | February 8, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Online weight loss forums have a policy of protecting their members from public shaming associated to being overweight, and provide them with judge-free platforms where members can share their experiences without being shamed by people who are within the normal weight boundaries. However, new research suggests that participants are more responsive to a specific type of posts compared to the others. Ingeborg Grønning, a researcher from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, has analyzed an online forum dedicated to weight loss, whose policy accepted comments from other participants. The results of the analysis showed that a category of posts received more comments. The researcher decided to analyze the entries of a used named "Astrid", who was very active on the forum. What Grønning discovered was that Astrid's confessions were the ones to have received the most positive responses. Entries such as "I've been eating sweets and drinking wine for several days" were received with a lot of empathy among the members of the forum. According to sociologist Erving Goffman, the term "saving face" describes the other users' actions as an attempt to save Astrid from being overweight, because they understand the pressure. "They step in to help her save face," noted Grønning. The results of the research were published in Grønning's article called "Digital absolution: Confessional interaction in an online weight loss forum", which is part of Grønning's doctorate thesis on morbid obesity. According to the researcher, there are three main types of responses that one could receive on weight loss forums. These are prospective, collective, and positive. The first type anticipates the positive output on the condition that the same course of action will be kept, the second one revolves around the mutual feeling of the group, and the third one consists of signs of support from the other members. "Of special sociological interest is how online interaction in the forum challenges the concept of 'civil inattention' (Goffman, 1971) as a basic social norm for interaction in public spaces. Rather, absolutional attention defines the interactional order within the forum, in which diary authors receive feedback on their accounts of challenges, problems and failures," noted the article. The posts involved in the research are accessible to every member of the forum. The participants' possibility to remain anonymous is highly important, as Grønning stated, given the stigma surrounding the idea of obesity. Additionally, the forum can be accessed regardless of the members' location, so people who are not from Norway can be part of it as well. At the same time, the researcher described the community as being a tolerant one, which — in her opinion — is a terrific fact. "Studying online communication in detail may contribute to an important theoretical refinement of interactionist sociology, which currently strongly rests on studies from pre-Internet times," concluded the research. In the United States, approximately 36.5 percent of adults have obesity, and the condition can be an underlying reason for developing a series of diseases, among which heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and certain types of cancer, according to the CDC. At the same time, the obesity epidemic is an increasing global issue, as the number of obese people is growing by the year. "As of 2000, the number of obese adults has increased to over 300 million. Contrary to conventional wisdom, the obesity epidemic is not restricted to industrialized societies; in developing countries, it is estimated that over 115 million people suffer from obesity-related problems", notes the WHO. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

According to AARP, nearly 90 percent of today’s seniors prefer to “age in place” and live independently in their homes rather than relocate to specialized housing. However, seniors and their loved ones should know that the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports falls and trip hazards continue to present very real dangers around the home, causing nearly 3 million injuries and even 27,000 deaths each year. Most troubling of all is the fact that most of these accidents could be easily prevented by taking some easy, precautionary steps. That is why Easy Climber created 31 Tips For Future Proofing Your Home, a handy, easy-to-read infographic detailing nearly three dozen common-sense steps seniors can to take to help mitigate risks in the home and ensure long-term, independent living. 31 Tips For Future Proofing Your Home offers a wealth of safety tips – big and small – to help seniors recognize – and reduce – overlooked hazards around the house. Suggestions run the gamut from simple recommendations like eliminating rugs and installing brighter LED bulbs to making more advanced investments such as installing motorized stair lifts and elevators to reduce the dangers that staircases present. The infographic also includes a variety of non-fall-related guidelines as well. For instance, did you know you can greatly reduce dangers in the kitchen by installing motion detectors that will automatically shut down overlooked stove tops and unused burners? Similarly, regularly putting fresh batteries in smoke detectors and investing in a fire extinguisher are two inexpensive ways to keep kitchens safe. See the full list of Easy Climber’s tips here. Failing to adequately age-proof a home can result in even the most independent-minded senior becoming dependent on loved ones or healthcare providers. By proactively making some simple changes around the home, it can help ensure you can age in place in peace. About Easy Climber Easy Climber Stair Lifts and Home Elevators are provided by one of the nation’s largest home improvement companies, Aging in the Home Remodelers, Inc., an organization devoted to supporting independent living for seniors.


News Article | January 28, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Ticked Off! Here's What You Need To Know About Lyme Disease The most comprehensive study of children who suffer from undiagnosed rare developmental disorders identified 14 new developmental disabilities. The research was conducted at the Wellcome Trust Sanger institute and it also managed to diagnose uncommon developmental issues for more than 1,000 kids and their families. The study, published Jan. 25 in the journal Nature, allows the families who suffer from the same genetic conditions to connect and access support. The results also accelerate research into the mechanisms of these diseases, as well as possible therapies. Thousands of children who develop abnormally due to genetic problems are born every year. This situation can lead to a series of conditions such as heart defects, intellectual disability, autism, or epilepsy. There are more than 1,000 recognized genetic causes but there are still a lot of rare individual developmental disorders with unknown genetic causes. The Deciphering Developmental Disorders (DDD) study is aimed at finding diagnoses for children who suffer from unknown developmental diseases, proving that genomic technologies can improve diagnostic tests. The research team investigated spontaneous new mutations that occur as DNA is transferred from parents to their children. The kids' conditions were clinically assessed and the team grouped together children who suffered from similar types of disorders to provide diagnoses for their conditions. The team managed to diagnose kids who had new mutations in genes that are already connected to developmental disorders, in approximately one in every four children in the research. Aside from finding new mutations in already known developmental disorders, the team identified 14 new ones. All the new diseases are caused by the same trigger — spontaneous mutations not found in either of the parents. According to the research, approximately one in every 300 newborns in the United Kingdom has a rare developmental condition caused by a new mutation in existing developmental disorders, adding up to 2,000 newborns a year in the country. Another finding of the research was that older parents are at higher risks of giving birth to a child who will suffer from a developmental disorder caused by a new mutation. "We estimate that 42% of our cohort carry pathogenic DNMs in coding sequences; approximately half of these DNMs disrupt gene function and the remainder result in altered protein function. We estimate that developmental disorders caused by DNMs have an average prevalence of 1 in 213 to 1 in 448 births, depending on parental age," noted the research. According to the CDC, developmental disorders occur among Americans as well, regardless of racial, ethnic and socioeconomic factors. According to recent estimates, one in six children aged 3 to 17 years has one or more developmental disorders, among which ADHD, ASD, cerebral palsy, hearing loss, intellectual disability, learning disability, vision impairment, and other developmental delays. "Most developmental disabilities are thought to be caused by a complex mix of factors. These factors include genetics; parental health and behaviors (such as smoking and drinking) during pregnancy; complications during birth; infections the mother might have during pregnancy or the baby might have very early in life; and exposure of the mother or child to high levels of environmental toxins, such as lead," noted the CDC website. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Albright A.L.,CDC | Gregg E.W.,CDC
American Journal of Preventive Medicine | Year: 2013

There are as many as 79 million people in the U.S. with prediabetes, and their risk of developing type 2 diabetes is four to 12 times higher than it is for people with normal glucose tolerance. Although advances in diabetes treatment are still needed, there is a critical need to implement effective strategies to stem the current and projected growth in new cases of type 2 diabetes. RCTs and translation studies have demonstrated that type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed in those at high risk, through a structured lifestyle intervention that can be delivered cost effectively. In order to bring this compelling lifestyle intervention to communities across America, Congress authorized the CDC to establish and lead the National Diabetes Prevention Program. Several aspects of the etiology of type 2 diabetes suggest that strategies addressing both those at high risk and the general population are necessary to make a major impact on the diabetes epidemic.

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