CCS HAU Regional Research Station

Karnāl, India

CCS HAU Regional Research Station

Karnāl, India
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Kaushik N.,CCS HAU Regional Research Station | Tikkoo A.,CCS HAU Regional Research Station | Yadav P.K.,CCS HAU Regional Research Station | Deswal R.P.S.,CCS HAU Regional Research Station | Singh S.,CCS HAU Regional Research Station
Agricultural Research | Year: 2017

Reduction in yield of arable crops under agroforestry in the tropics and subtropics is well known, but information on how different agroforestry systems influence the yield of crops is scanty. All types of agroforestry models may not be useful for all sites, but the old and traditional practices can be manipulated for meeting site-specific needs. Therefore, various agroforestry models (agri–silvi–horti systems) were developed to study their performance under semiarid conditions in north-west India. The experiment was conducted in ten-year-old silvi–horti systems comprising of shisham (Dalbergia sissoo L.) + aonla (Embilica officinalis Gaertn.), shisham (D. sissoo) + guava (Psidium guajava L.), khejri (Prosopis cineraria (L.) Druce) + aonla (E. officinalis) and khejri (P. cineraria) + guava (P. guajava) planted at a spacing of 6 m × 6 m. Three crop sequences, viz. cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp)—wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), clusterbean (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L.) Taub)—barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum (L.) R. Br.)—oat (Avena sativa L.), were intecropped for 2 years. The crops were also grown in open field. The fodder yield of the kharif crops, namely pearl millet, cowpea and cluster bean, was significantly suppressed by different silvi–horti systems during the period of study, and maximum yield was observed in sole cropping. Among different silvi–horti systems, maximum fodder yield of cowpea (10.27 t/ha) and clusterbean (5.67 t/ha) was recorded under khejri + guava, whereas pearl millet fodder yield (18.93 t/ha) was maximum in khejri + aonla silvi–horti system. Minimum fodder yield (3.47 t/ha) was recorded in clusterbean under shisham + guava, whereas maximum fodder yield (29.3 t/ha) was recorded in pearl millet under sole cropping. In rabi season, maximum grain yield of wheat (4.07 t/ha) and barley (4.38 t/ha) was recorded under sole cropping while minimum yield of wheat (2.34 t/ha) and barley (2.79 t/ha) was recorded under shisham + aonla. Fodder yield of oat was also influenced significantly by different silvi–horti systems. Maximum oat fodder yield of 62.00 t/ha was harvested from open field followed by 56.20 t/ha under khejri + guava. Maximum fruit yield (13.40 t/ha) was observed in aonla + wheat + khejri agri–silvi–horti system. Appreciable build up in organic carbon content (OC) and decrease in soil pH under agri–silvi–horti systems as compared to sole cropping. The available NPK content also increased under agri–silvi–horti systems and decreased with increasing soil depth. The agri–silvi–horti system of khejri + guava + clusterbean–barley fetched higher net returns (Rs. 76,650/ha), while the net returns from sole cropping of clusterbean–barley was only Rs. 15,953/ha. © 2017, NAAS (National Academy of Agricultural Sciences).


Khippal A.,CCS HAU Regional Research Station | Khippal A.,ICAR Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research | Singh S.,CCS HAU Regional Research Station | Singh S.,CCSHAU Regional Research Station | And 7 more authors.
Legume Research | Year: 2016

To increase the area, production and productivity of sugarcane and legumes/oilseeds for increasing the profit of the farmers’, field experiments were conducted at Chaudhary Charan Singh Haryana Agricultural University, Regional Research Station, Karnal during 2005-06 and 2006-07 followed by demonstrations on intercropping of legumes/oilseed with sugarcane at farmers’ field in Kaithal district during 2009-10 and 2010-11. Cane yield did not reduce significantly due to intercropping except raya during 2005 -06. The percent incidence of pink borer, shoot borer, top borer and root borer remained below economical threshold level (ETL). In all intercropping systems, total land equivalent ratio (LERt) was greater than unity, indicated yield advantage for the intercropped plots. Land equivalent coefficient (LEC) followed the same pattern as LERt. Total area time equivalent ratio (ATERt) values showed an advantage (22-28 %) with all intercropping systems than sole cropping with maximum advantage from sugarcane + chickpea. Sugarcane was more competitive than pea and lentil intercrops, whereas, raya and chickpea were more competitive than sugarcane. Higher competitive ratio values for the intercrops (CRi) indicated that all the intercrops were more competitive than sugarcane. Total values of actual yield loss (AYL) showed an advantage of 22-38% from intercropping compared to sole cropping. Highest monetary advantage index (MAI) value was obtained from sugarcane + pea intercropping system (75779). However, the minimum MAI was obtained from sugarcane + lentil intercropping system (62382). Demonstrations on intercropping at farmers’ field also resulted in higher gross returns, returns over variable cost and benefit: cost ratio. © 2016, Agricultural Research Communication Centre. All rights reserved.


Singh S.R.,Center for Plant Biotechnology | Singh S.R.,Kurukshetra University | Dalal S.,Kurukshetra University | Singh R.,Center for Plant Biotechnology | And 3 more authors.
Indian Journal of Plant Physiology | Year: 2012

A highly efficient and cost effective protocol for rapid in vitro propagation of Dendrocalamus hamiltonii Arn. ex Munro through multiple shoot formation from nodal explants, followed by mass scale production and field evaluation, has been developed after examining the effect of season, media type, carbon source, growth regulators and transplanting media on micropropagation. Early summer (April-June) was the best period for explant collection. Among the different media (B5, MS, NN and SH) tested, MS was found to be the best for micropropagation. A multiplication rate of about 5.6-folds with healthy cultures was achieved by the 3rd subculture, when shoots were transferred every 3 weeks to fresh MS medium supplemented with 1.5μM TDZ and 56.0μM ascorbic acid. TDZ was found superior to BAP and kinetin for both axillary buds sprouting, as well as, shoot multiplication. Replacement of sucrose with table sugar during shoot multiplication did not affect the multiplication frequency. Optimal rooting of 89% was achieved on half MS medium supplemented with 25.0μM IBA and 36.0μM choline chloride. Regenerated plantlets were acclimatized and hardened in green house using dune sand and vermicompost (3:1) with 79.76% success, and successfully transferred to the field with ̃85% survival rate. More than 3000 tissue culture raised plantlets have been successfully transferred to approximately 7.5 hectares of land. A cost effective method of clonal propagation of D. hamiltonii with a better field survival rate has been developed.


Tikkoo A.,CCS HAU Regional Research Station | Yadav S.S.,CCS HAU Regional Research Station | Kaushik N.,CCS HAU Regional Research Station
Soil and Tillage Research | Year: 2013

Potential of Jatropha curcas L. for producing energy from marginal land without inputs has recently drawn the attention, resulting in the planning of large commercial plantations in India and other countries. Major challenge for the extended use of J. curcas seems to be the lack of information on agro-technology and specially the water and nutrient management on its potential yield under sub-optimal and marginal conditions. Therefore, it is very difficult to estimate the yields from future plantations under sub-optimal growth conditions, the situations where J. curcas is supposed to grow. The impacts of irrigation and nutrients on seed and oil yield of J. curcas in semi-arid conditions of northwest India are discussed here. An experiment was conducted for consecutive three years (2009-2011) at CCS HAU, Regional Research Station, Bawal (Haryana), India, in three years old J. curcas plantation raised at spacing of 3m×3m in loamy sand, N deficient and medium K status soil. The treatments were comprised of three levels of irrigations viz.; no irrigation (I0), one irrigation (I1) and two irrigations (I2), four levels of nitrogen (N) i.e.; 0, 30, 60 and 90kgNha-1 and four levels of potassium (K) i.e.; 0, 30, 45 and 60kgK2Oha-1. J. curcas seed yield increased from 163.71kgha-1 with no irrigation to 472.51kgha-1 at 90kgN and 60kgK2Oha-1 with two irrigations. J. curcas seed yield increased significantly at 60kgNha-1 with no irrigation whereas seed yield increased significantly up to 90kgNha-1 with one and two irrigations. The significant effect of potassium application on seed yield was found up to 45K2Oha-1 in the absence of irrigation but its effect was significant up to 60kgK2Oha-1 with one and two irrigations. The seed oil content and oil yield of J. curcas also increased due to irrigation, nitrogen and potassium application .The maximum oil content (34.52%) and oil yield (163.31kgha-1) was recorded at 90kgN and 60kgK2Oha-1 with two irrigations. However, poor seed and oil yield of 291.55 and 89.13kgha-1 respectively was obtained under sub-optimal conditions i.e.; one irrigation with 30kgN and 30kgK2Oha-1. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Singh S.R.,Center for Plant Biotechnology | Singh S.R.,Kurukshetra University | Dalal S.,Kurukshetra University | Singh R.,Center for Plant Biotechnology | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Plant Biochemistry and Biotechnology | Year: 2012

Effect of season, media type, carbon source, growth regulators and transplanting media on micropropagation of Dendrocalamus asper, an important bamboo species, was examined. The season of explant collection played an important role in axillary bud sprouting and spring (February-April) was found to be the best period for explant collection. Among the different media MS was found to be the best for micropropagation. Maximum numbers (4.83/explant) of shoots were initiated in MS + 15 μM BAP. For shoot multiplication, MS medium supplemented with 10 μM BAP and 75 μM Adenine sulfate was used. BAP was superior to KIN for both explant establishment, as well as, shoot multiplication. Optimal rooting was achieved in shoots cultured on 1/2 strength MS medium supplemented with 5 μM each of IBA and NAA. Regenerated plantlets were acclimatized and hardened in green house using dune sand and vermi-compost (3:1) with 92. 34% success and transferred to the field with 100% survival rate. In the field, plants supplied with FYM along with urea showed better growth and development. Macroproliferation, plant multiplication by separating the rooted tillers of well established in vitro raised plantlets after 5 to 6 months of growth in the green house could double the multiplication rate. More than 25000 in vitro raised plants were successfully transferred to the field and no morphological variations in growth were observed, thus proving the potential of tissue culture for raising large scale plantations of D. asper. © 2011 Society for Plant Biochemistry and Biotechnology.


Kaushik N.,CCS HAU Regional Research Station | Kumar K.,CCS HAU Regional Research Station | Kumar S.,CCS HAU Regional Research Station | Beniwal R.S.,CCS HAU Regional Research Station | Suman,CCS HAU Regional Research Station
Range Management and Agroforestry | Year: 2011

The magnitude of variability in Pongamia pinnata germplasm collected from different parts of Haryana was assessed. In total 40 plus trees based on morphometric characters were selected. Maximum values for seed length (23.18 mm), 100-pod weight (400.80 g) and100-seed weight (185.37 g) were observed in accession 527962. Accession no. 524747 showed maximum oil content (43.06 %) and pod length (55.47 mm). Genetic divergence indicated considerable diversity among 40 accessions. Eight clusters were obtained based on non-hierarchical Euclidian cluster analysis. Cluster I exhibited maximum intra cluster distance (5.47) whereas, maximum inter cluster distance was observed between cluster VI and VIII (9.251). Cluster IV recorded highest value for seed length (24.17), breadth (16.10), thickness (9.93), 100-seed weight (186.80) and 100-pod weight (403.93). Cluster VI recorded the highest value for pod length (57.03), pod breadth (25.37) and oil content (44.07). Thus crosses involving clusters IV and VI may be suggested alongwith further selection for the overall improvement of species.

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