Deventer, Netherlands
Deventer, Netherlands

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Van Rens G.L.M.A.,CCS Energy Consulting | Huisman G.H.,CCS Energy Consulting | De Lathouder H.,CCS Energy Consulting | Cornelissen R.L.,CCS Energy Consulting
Biomass and Bioenergy | Year: 2011

A desktop study has been performed to analyse the performance of biomass-to-fuel plants producing methanol, dimethylether (DME) or hydrogen. Two different designs have been made. One design based on the technology of today and one design based on the technology of tomorrow. Mass and energy balances are presented for both designs producing all three fuels. Biomass-to-fuel conversion efficiencies (LHV) of the plants range between 45 and 56% for hydrogen and DME production respectively in the present-day design and between 56 and 69% for hydrogen and methanol production respectively for the near-future design. Biomass-to-fuel conversion efficiency to DME is only marginally smaller than biomass-to-fuel conversion efficiency of methanol. Expression of efficiency of the biomass-to-fuel plant in biomass-to-fuel conversion efficiency does not include electrical power consumption and district heat generation. Exergy also includes the quality of the energy that is consumed or generated. Therefore exergetic efficiency should be used to express process efficiency. Methanol production using the technology of tomorrow is most efficient with exergetic efficiency of 55%. The least efficient is hydrogen production with exergetic efficiency of 40% and 45%, for present-day and near-future design, respectively. This is caused by the large purge stream in the plant design. The use of new technologies developed within the CHRISGAS project give an increase of 5-8% points in exergetic efficiency. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Huisman G.H.,CCS Energy Consulting | Van Rens G.L.M.A.,CCS Energy Consulting | De Lathouder H.,CCS Energy Consulting | Cornelissen R.L.,CCS Energy Consulting
Biomass and Bioenergy | Year: 2011

A desktop study has been performed to estimate the cost of biomass-to-fuel plants producing methanol, dimethylether (DME) or hydrogen. Two different designs have been distinguished. One design based on the technology of today and one design based on the technology of tomorrow. The investment costs of the near-future design are lower, but the yearly running costs of the near-future design are higher than the present-day design for the same biomass input. In the present-day design the net power demand is lower and more district heat can be sold. The specific production costs (Euro per kg or Euro per GJ) for fuel are lower for the near-future design because of the higher product yield. In this case production costs are 362, 541 and 1817 € t-1 methanol, DME and hydrogen, respectively. Production costs are most sensitive to variations in biomass price and to a lesser extent capital costs. A 50% change in biomass price changes the specific production cost between 20 and 35%. Hydrogen production costs are highly sensitive to sale of district heat. Calculated production costs of dimethylether are competitive with biodiesel. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

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