University Case Medical Center

Cleveland, OH, United States

University Case Medical Center

Cleveland, OH, United States
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Mehta L.,University Case Medical Center | Mehta L.,Case Western Reserve University | Huber R.T.,University Case Medical Center | Huber R.T.,University Hospitals Case Medical Center | Faulhaber P.F.,Case Western Reserve University
PET Clinics | Year: 2012

Each anatomic region of the head and neck has physiologic variations that can mimic a primary tumor or lymph node. Many of these variations can be recognized as reflecting benign lymphoid, salivary, brown fat, and muscular activity. A few artifacts are related to computed tomography (CT) attenuation. A knowledge of tumor types and patterns of lymph node and metastatic spread helps categorize patterns as benign or malignant. The anatomic reference of CT helps solve many pitfalls. A recently introduced instrument, PET/magnetic resonance imaging, will face new pitfalls as its role in oncology is developed. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.


Richards D.,Mass General Hospital | Larkin M.,Mass General Hospital | Milaszewski K.,Joslin Diabetes Center | Javier E.,Mass General Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Diabetes Educator | Year: 2013

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine reports of diabetes learning needs by youth with type 2 diabetes and their family support person (FSP) and to examine correlations of these perceptions with demographic variables. Methods: Data were analyzed from the Participant Needs Assessment (PNA), a routinely self-administered questionnaire designed to assess learning needs, in 191 youth (mean age = 14.0 ± 1.9 years, duration 8.78 ± 6.30 months; 36% black, non-Hispanic; 40% Hispanic; 20% white) enrolled in the TODAY (Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth) study. Youth and their FSPs completed the PNA at scheduled study visits, rating their learning needs on a 5-point scale, with higher scores indicating higher needs. Paired t tests and ANOVA were used. Results: There were no differences in reported learning needs by gender, although scores on the Teen Issues scale approached significance, with girls reporting higher needs than boys. Youth and FSPs were similar on their reports of needs on 3 scales (Ordinary Day, Nutrition, and Living With Diabetes), but youth reported higher needs than FSPs on Focus and Teen Issues. Controlling for duration of diabetes, these differences between youth and FSPs persisted. In general, learning needs for both youth and FSPs decreased over time. Conclusions: Youth with type 2 diabetes and their FSPs have high levels of ongoing learning needs despite completion of a standard diabetes education program. Continued assessment of learning needs, follow-up education, and behavioral approaches are warranted for these high-risk youth. © 2013 The Author(s).


PubMed | Case Western Reserve University and University Case Medical Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PET clinics | Year: 2016

Each anatomic region of the head and neck has physiologic variations that can mimic a primary tumor or lymph node. Many of these variations can be recognized as reflecting benign lymphoid, salivary, brown fat, and muscular activity. A few artifacts are related to computed tomography (CT) attenuation. A knowledge of tumor types and patterns of lymph node and metastatic spread helps categorize patterns as benign or malignant. The anatomic reference of CT helps solve many pitfalls. A recently introduced instrument, PET/magnetic resonance imaging, will face new pitfalls as its role in oncology is developed.

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