Waukesha, WI, United States
Waukesha, WI, United States

Carroll University is a private liberal arts college affiliated with the Presbyterian Church USA located in Waukesha in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. Carroll opened in 1846, two years before Wisconsin became a state. Before July 1, 2009, Carroll University was known as Carroll College. Wikipedia.

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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has ranked the best colleges in Wisconsin for 2017. Of the 35 four-year schools who made the list, University of Wisconsin Madison, Marquette University, Saint Norbert College, Viterbo University and Lawrence University ranked the highest. 16 two-year schools also made the list; Chippewa Valley Technical College, Mid-State Technical College, Fox Valley Technical College, Lakeshore Technical College and Western Technical College were determined to be the best five. A full list of all schools is included below. “Strong economic benefits can come from having a highly-educated workforce,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.Org. “These Wisconsin schools not only offer quality degree programs that show the value of higher education, they also have demonstrated a commitment to ensuring their students’ post-college success.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in Wisconsin” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also appraised on additional data that includes annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college, career counseling services, student/teacher ratio, availability of financial aid and graduation rate. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Wisconsin” list, visit: The Best Four-Year Colleges in Wisconsin for 2017 include: Alverno College Beloit College Cardinal Stritch University Carroll University Carthage College Concordia University-Wisconsin Edgewood College Lakeland College Lawrence University Maranatha Baptist University Marian University Marquette University Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design Milwaukee School of Engineering Mount Mary University Northland College Ottawa University-Milwaukee Ripon College Saint Norbert College Silver Lake College of the Holy Family University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire University of Wisconsin-Green Bay University of Wisconsin-La Crosse University of Wisconsin-Madison University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh University of Wisconsin-Parkside University of Wisconsin-Platteville University of Wisconsin-River Falls University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point University of Wisconsin-Stout University of Wisconsin-Superior University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Viterbo University Wisconsin Lutheran College The Best Two-Year Colleges in Wisconsin for 2017 include: Blackhawk Technical College Chippewa Valley Technical College Fox Valley Technical College Gateway Technical College Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College Lakeshore Technical College Mid-State Technical College Milwaukee Area Technical College Moraine Park Technical College Nicolet College Northcentral Technical College Northeast Wisconsin Technical College Southwest Wisconsin Technical College Waukesha County Technical College Western Technical College Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Honor recognizes the devotion of time, talent and resources to improving the care of cancer patients NEW YORK, N.Y. -- Nov. 10, 2016 -- Dr. Daniel Von Hoff, Physician-In-Chief and Distinguished Professor at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), has been selected as a 2016 Giant of Cancer Care. The award was announced today during the 34th annual Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium in New York. Dr. Von Hoff, a world-renowned expert in pancreatic cancer, was honored for his work in the field of gastrointestinal cancer. He was selected from among nearly 200 nominees and 46 finalists in 10 categories by Giants of Cancer Care, which is presented by OncLive. "It is our privilege to honor such an esteemed member of the oncology community with this award and commemorate your achievements and the significant impact you have had on the profession, your peers, and the patients everywhere," according to a letter announcing Dr. Von Hoff's selection. The Giants of Cancer Care recognition program honors those who have devoted their time, talent and resources to improving care for patients and families who are affected by cancer. Their discoveries have propelled the field forward and established the building blocks for future advances. Recipients demonstrate the qualities of unlimited selflessness, compassion for their patients, and a desire to understand and develop life-changing treatments. "It is indeed an honor to be recognized along with so many other fine physicians and researchers devoted to improving the lives of people," said Dr. Von Hoff, who has been instrumental in developing numerous new cancer treatments. He also is Chief Scientific Officer at HonorHealth Research Institute, and Professor of Medicine at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Von Hoff currently leads an international Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C) Pancreatic Cancer Dream Team, developing new treatments for this disease. It is one of three SU2C Dream Team grants awarded to TGen. "Without question, Dr. Von Hoff is one of the world's most accomplished cancer physician-researchers, and certainly is deserving of being considered a Giant of Cancer Care," said Dr. Jeffrey Trent, TGen President and Research Director. "His contributions and commitment to patient care are extraordinary." Dr. Von Hoff graduated cum laude from Carroll University, and received his M.D. from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. He completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, then completed a medical oncology fellowship at the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Von Hoff served a six-year term on President Bush's National Cancer Advisory Board (2004-10). He is a Fellow and past President of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the world's largest cancer research organization; a Fellow of the American College of Physicians; and a Fellow and past board member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). He received ASCO's 2010 David A. Karnofsky Memorial Award for his outstanding contributions to cancer research leading to significant improvement in patient care. Dr. Von Hoff also is the recipient of the Wallace A. Reed, M.D. Award, recognizing his accomplishments in advancing innovative cancer treatments, from the Arizona Medical Association; and the Award of Excellence from the Hope Funds for Cancer Research, for his work over the past decade in the clinical development of many new cancer treatments. Dr. Von Hoff and his colleagues have conducted early clinical investigations of many new cancer agents, including: gemcitabine, docetaxel, paclitaxel, topotecan, irinotecan, fludarabine, mitoxantrone, dexrazoxane, nab-paclitaxel, vismodegib, and others. These treatments are helping many patients with breast, ovarian, prostate, colon, leukemia, advanced basal cell and pancreatic cancers. Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit). TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: http://www. . Follow TGen on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter @TGen.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

PHOENIX, Ariz. -- May 8, 2017 -- Dr. Daniel Von Hoff -- Distinguished Professor, Physician-In-Chief, and Director of Molecular Medicine at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) -- will receive a gold medal for excellence in clinical medicine from his alma mater, Columbia University. Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons Alumni Association will present the award May 13 in New York City to Dr. Von Hoff, a world-renowned expert in new therapies for patients with cancer. "This medal represents the highest honor which the Alumni Association can bestow in recognition of your outstanding accomplishments," said Dr. Kenneth A. Forde, chair of the P&S Alumni Association Honors and Awards Committee, which represents some of the nation's most accomplished medical professionals. This year marks the 250th anniversary of P&S, and its founding as the first medical school in Colonial America to award an Medical Doctorate degree. "This recognition is especially gratifying as it is being presented by notable fellow graduates of my medical school, and I am deeply humbled and appreciative to be counted among those devoted to the welfare of patients," said Dr. Von Hoff, who has been instrumental in developing numerous new cancer treatments. He also is a Senior Consultant-Clinical Investigations for City of Hope, Chief Scientific Officer at HonorHealth Research Institute, and Professor of Medicine at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Von Hoff currently co-leads an international Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C) Pancreatic Cancer Dream Team, developing new treatments for this disease. It is one of three SU2C Dream Team grants awarded to TGen. He graduated cum laude from Carroll University (1969), and received his M.D. from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons (1973). He completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, then completed a medical oncology fellowship at the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Von Hoff is a past director of the University of Arizona's Arizona Cancer Center. He also is a past board member and president of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), a Fellow of the AACR, and recipient of the distinguished AACR Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Memorial Award. In addition, he is a past board member of the American Association of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and winner of its prestigious David A. Karnofsky Memorial Award for outstanding contributions to patient care and treatment. He served a six-year term on President Bush's National Cancer Advisory Board (2004-10); is a recipient of the Wallace A. Reed M.D. Award, recognizing his accomplishments in advancing innovative cancer treatments, from the Arizona Medical Association; and received the Award of Excellence from the Hope Funds for Cancer Research, for his work in the clinical development of many new cancer treatments. Dr. Von Hoff and his colleagues have conducted early clinical investigations of many new cancer agents, including: gemcitabine, docetaxel, paclitaxel, topotecan, irinotecan, nanoliposomal irinotecan, fludarabine, mitoxantrone, dexrazoxane, nab-paclitaxel, vismodegib, and others. These treatments are helping many patients with breast, ovarian, prostate, colon, leukemia, advanced basal cell and pancreatic cancers. Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit). TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. TGen is allied with City of Hope, a world-renowned independent research and cancer and diabetes treatment center. This precision medicine alliance enables both institutes to complement each other in research and patient care, with City of Hope providing a significant clinical setting to advance scientific discoveries made by TGen. For more information, visit: http://www. . Follow TGen on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter @TGen.


Hu C.,Carroll University
ACM Inroads | Year: 2013

Design plays a critical role in the software's quality and long-term success. Yet, software design, as a systematic process, is not sufficiently understood, and its practice in the real world is highly varied. As a result, teaching software design remains a challenge in terms of lacking widely recognized and accepted pedagogy and even learning materials. These factors have played a role in persistently poor student learning achievement. The article makes an attempt to discuss what software design is and explore what teaching of software design may mean and entail. It also reviews published pedagogical studies and reports, composes heuristic suggestions, and searches directions of future research.


While the debate over species concepts and criteria affects all organisms on Earth, no group of organisms demonstrates a need for a consilient, universal species concept better than the haplochromine cichlids of Lake Malawi. These fishes, which are the single greatest radiation of vertebrates on the planet, are a daunting taxonomic puzzle for ichthyologists and evolutionary biologists who try to piece together the history and diversity of these fishes. Accordingly, a number of attempts to apply species concepts to these fishes have been attempted, though rarely with a satisfactory outcome. Focusing on the rock-dwelling cichlids, or mbuna, of Lake Malawi, I evaluate the species concepts that have been applied to these fishes, and conclude that the consilient formulation of the Evolutionary Species Concept is the most appropriate species concept to apply to both our current understanding of the mbuna, and future investigations of mbuna speciation and taxonomy. To further demonstrate the applicability and utility of the Evolutionary Species Concept, I provide a closer examination of the genus Labeotropheus, which has been overlooked in recent taxonomic investigations of the mbuna. While most other mbuna genera have had additional, formally described species added to them, if not additional provisionally named species, Labeotropheus has been ignored, largely due to inappropriately applied species concepts and criteria. I provide a possible research program for the Labeotropheus, based on the consilient formulation of the Evolutionary Species Concept, culminating in the description of new species. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Campus Cyberinfrastrc (CC-NIE) | Award Amount: 50.04K | Year: 2014

This planning grant supports Carroll Universitys efforts to develop a plan to improve its campus network infrastructure aligning with the goals described in NSFs Campus Cyberinfrastructure-Infrastructure, Innovation and Engineering (CC*IIE) Program. The 12-month planning period includes the following activities: evaluate existing IT infrastructure against STEM research and education needs on campus, identify unmet needs, and define a plan to address them; develop a campus cyberinfrastructure (CI) plan aligned with Carrolls strategic planning; and study and develop a science DMZ approach to re-architecting the campus border. Planning for network improvements at Carroll is especially timely to achieve maximum leverage in enabling research and education activities across lab facilities. The work also impacts the institutions existing emphasis on undergraduate research.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: IRES | Award Amount: 250.00K | Year: 2016

This International Research Experiences for Students (IRES) project provides a 12-week research experience at the University of Strathclyde in Scotland for fifteen Carroll University students. The goals of the project are twofold. First, to develop students? cross-disciplinary scientific research skills by embedding them in projects and facilities that are not available at a small undergraduate institution. To achieve this goal, each student will join a research group and project in the Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry at Strathcylde for a summer of research. The second goal is to prepare students to thrive in an interdependent and multicultural scientific environment (and future career) by emphasizing the cultural aspects of the experience. This program produces increased cross-cultural awareness and competence - derived from a pre-trip cultural competence course, cultural seminars overseas, and the experience of living and working in another culture for a summer. In order to support broader participation in this project, special effort is given to recruiting into the program students from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in the sciences.

The research that the students will undertake is cutting-edge and highly relevant to today?s world. While at Strathclyde, our students will carry out individual projects related to alternative energy technology, nanoscience and materials chemistry. In particular, they will work on self-assembled organic photovoltaic materials, redox flow battery systems, and nanoparticle assemblies for healthcare diagnostics and therapy. The students will benefit from working on some of the most advanced instrumentation available, while collaborating with researchers who are pre-eminent in their fields. All students will present their work at local and national meetings, and we expect that many of the students will also contribute to peer-reviewed publications, thus helping to disseminate their results to the broader scientific community.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 244.06K | Year: 2014

Carroll University has received funds to create a research and education center at the Carroll University Greene Field Station (GFS). Despite the lack of on-site facilities for research and appropriate infrastructure to support data acquisition, management, and dissemination, Carroll faculty and students have conducted research at the GFS outdoor laboratory since the 1970s. The renovation of an existing building into a research facility will expand research agendas, provide infrastructure needed for outside collaboration and community use, and offer space for the university to introduce the experimenting across the curriculum initiative, a groundbreaking project that will integrate research and education, educating all students in scientific literacy. The research and education center will also provide the foundation needed for Carroll faculty to conduct ongoing projects both in ecological and pedagogical research.

The expanded GFS will serve as an important research facility not just for science students and faculty at Carroll University, but also for non-science majors to become citizen scientists. The observational and experimental data accessible at the facility will contribute to public participation in scientific research efforts and provide benefits to society. All Carroll students will be trained in the processes of sciences as they submit data collected at the GFS to regional and national databases. One quarter of Carrolls undergraduate students are first generation and 21% come from economically disadvantaged families. Providing an opportunity for students to participate in well-supported inquiry based learning at the facility through their general education coursework will broaden participation of underrepresented groups in the processes of science. The new facility will also broaden collaborations across universities, area school districts, non-profit agencies, and governmental agencies, thus enhancing the infrastructure for research and education in the community. More information about the GFS can be found at: http://www.carrollu.edu/greene-field-station/.


Pioli M.F.,Carroll University
Aging and Mental Health | Year: 2010

Objectives: The study tests the circumstances under which global mastery and caregiving mastery moderate the impact of objective and subjective stressors on depressive and anxious symptoms among Alzheimer's caregivers. Methods: Data from a sample of 200 spousal caregivers to people with Alzheimer's disease were examined. Sixteen separate models were tested with depression and anxiety regressed on two measures of objective demand (activities of daily living and problem behaviors) and two measures of subjective demand (role overload and role captivity) matched with each of the two mastery measures and their relevant interaction terms. Results: Caregiving mastery functions as a moderator in the relationship between subjective demands and depression and anxiety, that is, at higher levels of caregiving mastery, the positive association between role overload and role captivity on depression and anxiety was weaker. Although there is a strong main effect of global mastery on mental health, it was not found to act as a moderator in this study. Conclusion: The findings demonstrate the importance of evaluating role-specific measures, such as caregiving mastery, as well as assessing a variety of stressful demands, in order to explicate the pathways through which psychosocial resources exert their protective effects. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: S-STEM:SCHLR SCI TECH ENG&MATH | Award Amount: 382.16K | Year: 2012

The Carroll University STEP Initiative (CUSI) addresses the shortage of engineers in Waukesha County, Wisconsin. A partnership between area high schools, universities, and industry, the project aims to increase student interest in STEM careers, particularly engineering, with a focus on attracting female students. CUSI strengthens existing programs involving recruitment, retention, and transition of graduates to engineering careers. Recruitment is enhanced by way of partnerships, career guidance and job placement. Retention is strengthened via learning communities, mentoring, and a program that provides hands-on learning opportunities and leadership development for pre-engineering students. Transition involves improved connections with local industry designed to increase graduates in the local workforce who are equipped with the necessary skills for continued success. Evaluation of the project is largely based on successful increase in enrollment and graduates of the engineering program, as well as alumni activity beyond graduation.

The intellectual merit of the project is to serve as a model for other small, private, liberal arts institutions to partner with area high schools and local industry to expand and strengthen STEM pathways, to encourage more students to pursue engineering careers, and to address local workforce shortages and the Nations need for more STEM graduates. Broader impacts include: broadening participation of underrepresented groups in STEM fields, enhancing collaborative infrastructure for education, and advancing discovery while promoting teaching and learning.

Dissemination activities include presenting student projects to the broader community through annual engineering education exhibitions, and sharing project data and information via journals/publications and state/national conferences.

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