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Arevalo F.,Intecmar Instituto Tecnoloxico Para O Control Do Medio Marino Of Galicia | Correa J.,Intecmar Instituto Tecnoloxico Para O Control Do Medio Marino Of Galicia | Porro M.C.,Carretera Of Colexio Universitario | Cabado A.G.,Carretera Of Colexio Universitario | And 2 more authors.
Toxicon | Year: 2016

The effect of canning in pickled sauce and autoclaving on weight, toxin content, toxin concentration and toxicity of steamed mussels was studied. Weight decreased by 25.5%. Okadaic acid (OA) and DTX2 content of mussel meat decreased by 24.1 and 42.5%, respectively. The estimated toxicity of the mussel remained nearly unchanged (increased by 2.9%). A part of the toxins lost by the mussels was leached to the sauce but the remaining part should have been thermally degraded. DTX2 underwent more degradation than OA and, in both toxins, free forms more than conjugated ones. This process, therefore, cannot be responsible for the large increments of toxicity of processed mussels -relative to the raw ones-sometimes detected by food processing companies. The final product could be monitored in several ways, but analysing the whole can content or the mussel meat once rehydrated seems to be the most equivalents to the raw mussel controls. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Arevalo F.,Intecmar Instituto Tecnoloxico Para O Control Do Medio Marino Of Galicia | Correa J.,Intecmar Instituto Tecnoloxico Para O Control Do Medio Marino Of Galicia | Porro M.C.,Carretera Of Colexio Universitario | Cabado A.G.,Carretera Of Colexio Universitario | And 2 more authors.
Food Chemistry | Year: 2015

The effect of industrial steaming on mussels that had been naturally exposed to DSP toxins for a long time was studied using LC-MS/MS. The estimated toxicity increased with steaming by a percentage that cannot be explained by weight loss. The estimated toxin content per mussel increased substantially with the treatment, which can only be explained by an incorrect estimation by the technique (at the extraction or analytical level) or by the presence of unknown derivatives or analogues. Direct alkaline hydrolysis of the mussel meat yielded more toxin than the standard hydrolysis (hydrolysis of the methanolic extracts), suggesting that extraction was, at least in part, responsible for the increase of toxin content. In situations as the one described in this work, it can be expected that mussels with toxicities well below the regulatory limit could easily surpass that level after industrial steaming, thus producing important losses for food processors. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source

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