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News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Care... From the Heart, LLC, a home healthcare agency specializing in elder care, is now renting out office space for meetings and events. “We have redone our lower level and are renting out this space for people who need to hold a board meeting, class, seminar, or seek a place for any social or business meeting,” said Janez Hicks, owner of Care... From the Heart. Care... From the Heart, located at 766 Falmouth Road, Mashpee, MA, will offer other amenities upon request, such as coffee, muffins/bagels, sandwich and cookie platters, bottled water or juice, coffee, etc. “We are calling it ‘The Meeting Place,’ and had our first ‘renter’ within the first week,” added Hicks. The Meeting Place is available for rental from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m., but can be rented for any length of time depending on availability. It is 20’ x 30’ and the room capacity is thirty-five. Many people work remotely or from home and/or it is unreasonable to have an office of their own when they only need the space once in awhile, or infrequently enough that it does not make sense financially. “The Meeting Place is locally owned and operated, easily accessible, affordable, clean, cozy, and has room for any type of business or social meeting,” concluded Hicks. “It also includes a conference table, classroom tables, comfortable sitting area, kitchenette, TV, whiteboard, pull-down projection screen and the option for us to provide food and refreshments.” For more information about The Meeting Place, call Care... From the Heart at (508) 419-1879. About Care... From the Heart, LLC Care... From the Heart offers assistance to the elderly in maintaining safe, independent living in their own home. Its services include taking people to appointments, running errands, getting groceries, cooking meals, companionship and more. Care... From the Heart has an A+ BBB rating. For more information, please call (508) 419-1879, or visit http://www.carefromtheheartcapecod.com. The NALA offers small and medium-sized businesses effective ways to reach customers through new media. As a single-agency source, the NALA helps businesses flourish in their local community. The NALA’s mission is to promote a business’ relevant and newsworthy events and achievements, both online and through traditional media. For media inquiries, please call 805.650.6121, ext. 361.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Madame Dogbo is one of the female farmers benefitting from the VSLA program. In 2016, her cocoa farm was destroyed in a fire, leaving her and her four daughters in a perilous financial situation. With the help of a VSLA-funded loan, Madame Dogbo was able to plant cocoa again, and more importantly, earn the money to send her daughters to school. You can view her story, and more about the VSLA program, here. "On the VSLA meeting days, even if I have things to do like cooking, I stop everything and go there, because the VSLA has changed me—the VSLA has provided our community a great opportunity," said Madame Dogbo. The well-being of cocoa farmers is one of the most important steps of the bean to bar journey. As such, Mars, Inc. has pledged $1 million to CARE® to empower female farmers in Cote d'Ivoire. Consumers can now join those efforts. Starting July 7, for every purchase of specially marked DOVE® Chocolate PROMISES® at CVS Pharmacy locations, $1 will be donated to CARE®. "DOVE® Chocolate is thrilled to see the VSLA program with CARE has already exceeded expectations in year one," said Kerry Cavanaugh, Brand Director, DOVE® Chocolate, Mars Chocolate North America. "Through our joint efforts, we're starting to see women in these communities flourish, which impacts not only the quality of cocoa bean produced, but also education and healthcare opportunities for their family." Promoting gender equality and securing a larger voice for women within their communities has also been a major objective for DOVE® Chocolate and CARE®. Members of the 70 VSLA groups established in Cote d'Ivoire through the DOVE® partnership, have demonstrated positive group dynamics, with men and women from various backgrounds working together productively, which was uncommon before the program. "Now, women have a newfound confidence in their ability to own and manage cocoa farms," said Youssouf Ndjore, Cocoa Sustainability Director, CARE®. "Additionally, the community's perception of women is improving as men are beginning to take pride in their support of women who are running their own businesses and having dreams for the future." The DOVE® Chocolate Difference From bean to bar, Mars Chocolate North America takes great care to maintain the highest standards of quality when crafting DOVE® Chocolate. Every batch of beans is carefully and thoroughly evaluated for flavor and quality for use in DOVE® Chocolate to ensure the authentic rich taste of the cocoa is enjoyed by consumers around the world. It all starts with only the best cacao beans, which are tested by expert Mars Associate craftspeople for quality and flavor. The beans are then taken through special roasting and grinding techniques – a process rooted in European tradition - to create the signature silky smooth texture and great taste of DOVE® Chocolate. Finally, Mars adds the perfect combination of chocolate liquor and 100 percent pure cocoa butter to create a balanced taste that's not too sweet, nor too bitter. To learn more about the unique DOVE® Chocolate bean to bar process and to follow the CARE® partnership progress, please visit www.dovechocolatejourney.com. For more information about DOVE® Chocolate, visit Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. About Mars, Incorporated Mars, Incorporated is a private, family-owned business with more than a century of history, $35 billion in sales, and six diverse business segments producing some of the world's best-loved brands: PEDIGREE®, ROYAL CANIN®, IAMS®, BANFIELD® CESAR® (Petcare); M&M'S®, SNICKERS®, DOVE®, GALAXY®, MARS®, MILKY WAY®, TWIX® (Chocolate); DOUBLEMINT®, EXTRA®, ORBIT®, 5™, SKITTLES® (Wrigley); UNCLE BEN'S®, DOLMIO®, MASTERFOODS®, SEEDS OF CHANGE® (Food); ALTERRA COFFEE ROASTERS™, THE BRIGHT TEA COMPANY™, KLIX® FLAVIA® (Drinks); and COCOAVIA® (Symbioscience). Headquartered in McLean, VA, Mars operates in 421 facilities across 78 countries, where our more than 80,000 Associates —all united by the company's Five Principles of Quality, Efficiency, Responsibility, Mutuality and Freedom –strive every day to create relationships with our stakeholders that deliver growth we are proud of. For more information about Mars, Incorporated, please visit www.mars.com. Join us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube. About CARE Founded in 1945 with the creation of the CARE Package®, CARE is a leading humanitarian organization fighting global poverty. CARE places special focus on working alongside women and girls because, equipped with the proper resources, they have the power to lift whole families and entire communities out of poverty. That's why women and girls are at the heart of CARE's community-based efforts to improve education and health, create economic opportunity, respond to emergencies and confront hunger. Last year CARE worked in 94 countries and reached 80 million people. To learn more, visit www.care.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/dove-chocolate--care-continue-work-to-empower-female-farmers-in-cote-divoire-300461025.html


Casey S.E.,Columbia University | Gallagher M.C.,Columbia University | Makanda B.R.,CARE | Meyers J.L.,CARE International | And 2 more authors.
American Journal of Public Health | Year: 2011

In February 2008, trained female interviewers collected data on sexual violence and use of medical services following sexual assault from 607 women in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Exposure to sexual violence during the DRC's civil war was reported by 17.8% of the women; 4.8% of the women reported exposure to sexual violence after the war. Few sexual as sault survivors accessed timely medical care. Facility assessments showed that this care was rarely available. Clinical care for sexual as sault survivors must be integrated into primary health care for DRC women.


Smith S.L.,University of New Mexico | Rodriguez M.A.,CARE
Health Policy and Planning | Year: 2016

Nearly 300 000 women - almost all poor women in low-income countries - died from pregnancy-related complications in 2010. This represents a decline since the 1980s, when an estimated half million women died each year, but is still far higher than the aims set in the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) at the turn of the century. The 1970s, 1980s and 1990s witnessed a shift from near complete neglect of the issue to emergence of a network of individuals and organizations with a shared concern for reducing maternal deaths and growth in the number of organizations and governments with maternal health strategies and programmes. Maternal health experienced a marked change in agenda status in the 2000s, attracting significantly higher level attention (e.g. from world leaders) and greater resource commitments (e.g. as one issue addressed by US$40 billion in pledges to the 2010 Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health) than ever before. Several differences between network and actor features, issue characteristics and the policy environment pre- and post-2000 help to explain the change in agenda status for global maternal mortality reduction. Significantly, a strong poverty reduction norm emerged at the turn of the century; represented by the United Nations MDGs framework, the norm set unusually strong expectations for international development actors to advance included issues. As the norm grew, it drew policy attention to the maternal health goal (MDG 5). Seeking to advance the goals agenda, world leaders launched initiatives addressing maternal and child health. New network governance and framing strategies that closely linked maternal, newborn and child health shaped the initiatives. Diverse network composition - expanding beyond a relatively narrowly focused and technically oriented group to encompass allies and leaders that brought additional resources to bear on the problem - was crucial to maternal health's rise on the agenda in the 2000s. © 2015 The Author; all rights reserved.


Few models of how community mobilisation works have been elaborated in the scientific literature, and evaluation of the impact of these programmes on HIV and other health outcomes is extremely limited. Avahan, the India AIDS Initiative, has been implementing community mobilisation as part of its prevention programming with groups of high-risk individuals across six states since 2005. To articulate a programme theory and evaluation framework for evaluation of Avahan's approach to community mobilisation among female sex workers in four southern states in India. The authors use a goal-based evaluation approach to describe the programme goals and an underlying programme theory that specifies how the programme is expected to work. Using multilevel structural equation modelling with propensity score matching, the evaluation will compare what is observed in the data with the predicted relationships specified by the model. The Avahan model of community mobilisation posits that meaningful participation in high-risk group intervention, structural intervention and organisational development activities leads to identification, collectivisation and ownership, which in turn leads to improved programme outcomes. Strong community groups and an enabling environment reinforce social norm and behaviour change outcomes and lead to sustained impact. Specifying an explicit programme theory can aid in the evaluation of complex interventions, especially when the evaluation design is observational. In addition to articulating Avahan's community mobilisation approach in a model that can be tested, we recommend some specific measures and methods that could be used to improve evaluation efforts in the future.


Shiffman J.,American University of Washington | Quissell K.,American University of Washington | Schmitz H.P.,University of San Diego | Pelletier D.L.,Cornell University | And 7 more authors.
Health Policy and Planning | Year: 2016

Since 1990 mortality and morbidity decline has been more extensive for some conditions prevalent in low- and middle-income countries than for others. One reason may be differences in the effectiveness of global health networks, which have proliferated in recent years. Some may be more capable than others in attracting attention to a condition, in generating funding, in developing interventions and in convincing national governments to adopt policies. This article introduces a supplement on the emergence and effectiveness of global health networks. The supplement examines networks concerned with six global health problems: tuberculosis (TB), pneumonia, tobacco use, alcohol harm, maternal mortality and newborn deaths. This article presents a conceptual framework delineating factors that may shape why networks crystallize more easily surrounding some issues than others, and once formed, why some are better able than others to shape policy and public health outcomes. All supplement papers draw on this framework. The framework consists of 10 factors in three categories: (1) features of the networks and actors that comprise them, including leadership, governance arrangements, network composition and framing strategies; (2) conditions in the global policy environment, including potential allies and opponents, funding availability and global expectations concerning which issues should be prioritized; (3) and characteristics of the issue, including severity, tractability and affected groups. The article also explains the design of the project, which is grounded in comparison of networks surrounding three matched issues: TB and pneumonia, tobacco use and alcohol harm, and maternal and newborn survival. Despite similar burden and issue characteristics, there has been considerably greater policy traction for the first in each pair. The supplement articles aim to explain the role of networks in shaping these differences, and collectively represent the first comparative effort to understand the emergence and effectiveness of global health networks. © 2015 The Author; all rights reserved.


Galavotti C.,CARE | Wheeler T.,Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation | Kuhlmann A.S.,Manila Consulting Group Inc. | Saggurti N.,Population Council | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health | Year: 2012

Background: Few models of how community mobilisation works have been elaborated in the scientific literature, and evaluation of the impact of these programmes on HIV and other health outcomes is extremely limited. Avahan, the India AIDS Initiative, has been implementing community mobilisation as part of its prevention programming with groups of high-risk individuals across six states since 2005. Purpose: To articulate a programme theory and evaluation framework for evaluation of Avahan's approach to community mobilisation among female sex workers in four southern states in India. Methods: The authors use a goal-based evaluation approach to describe the programme goals and an underlying programme theory that specifies how the programme is expected to work. Using multilevel structural equation modelling with propensity score matching, the evaluation will compare what is observed in the data with the predicted relationships specified by the model. Results: The Avahan model of community mobilisation posits that meaningful participation in high-risk group intervention, structural intervention and organisational development activities leads to identification, collectivisation and ownership, which in turn leads to improved programme outcomes. Strong community groups and an enabling environment reinforce social norm and behaviour change outcomes and lead to sustained impact. Discussion: Specifying an explicit programme theory can aid in the evaluation of complex interventions, especially when the evaluation design is observational. In addition to articulating Avahan's community mobilisation approach in a model that can be tested, we recommend some specific measures and methods that could be used to improve evaluation efforts in the future. Copyright Article author (or their employer) 2012.


Shadi S.,Emory University | Alex M.,CARE | Rheingans R.D.,Emory University
Waterlines | Year: 2010

Despite the known health benefits of washing hands with soap, global handwashing rates are low. In Nyanza Province, Kenya, a follow-up of 55 pilot primary schools three years after the implementation of a safe water and hygiene intervention revealed that only 2 per cent (one school) provided soap for handwashing on the day of the assessment. After identifying barriers to soap provision, SWASH+ partners piloted a handwashing intervention using powdered soap mixed with water to create soapy water in place of bar soap in 11 schools. The first six months of unannounced visits showed high uptake (10 schools). A one-year follow-up visit revealed a decrease of soapy water use (four schools). This paper discusses the soapy water intervention, initial and follow-up monitoring findings, potential sustainability drivers of handwashing programmes in rural primary schools and next steps. © Practical Action Publishing, 2010.


ATLANTA, Dec. 8, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- In response to the recent U.S. presidential election, a quarter (25 percent) of Americans either already have or plan to increase their support for nonprofits and charities, according to a new online survey commissioned by the global...


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Care to Care is pleased to announce that Rachel Title, MD has accepted the position of Chief Medical Officer. She will oversee all clinical initiatives and programs for Care to Care. Dr. Title joined Care to Care in April 2015 as a Senior Medical Director and immediately engaged with clients, referring physicians and industry leaders in building our Radiation Therapy and Medical Oncology programs. Since joining Care to Care she has worked alongside Drs. Julian Safir and Michael Komarow, former Chief Medical Officers, and will continue to implement Care to Care’s patient centered and physician friendly approach to benefit management. Dr. Title is a Board Certified Diagnostic Radiologist specializing in Body and Breast Imaging. She graduated summa cum laude, and first in her class, from Boston University’s Accelerated Seven Year Medical Program with a major in Medical Sciences and a minor in Mathematics. While at Boston University Dr. Title received honors and awards including Phi Beta Kappa, Trustee Scholarship, and Alpha Omega Alpha honor society, where she served as president. She completed an internship in Internal Medicine at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland, a radiology residency at New York-Presbyterian Hospital Weill Cornell Medical Center and a fellowship in Breast & Body Imaging at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. Prior to joining Care to Care, Dr. Title was an Assistant Attending Radiologist in Breast & Body Imaging at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Assistant Professor of Radiology at New York-Presbyterian Hospital Weill Cornell. Her training and experience at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center have given her a strong background in oncologic imaging. She also has years of experience in private practice where she served as Director of Breast MRI. Dr. Title has published several journal articles and has presented her research at the RSNA annual meeting. “Her principles are completely aligned with our mission to Deliver evidence-based solutions to promote the most efficient and effective use of medical resources, across a range of specialties, for the benefit of patients, payers, physicians, and providers.” stated Barbara Kelman, Chief Operating Officer. About Care to Care, LLC Care to Care is a URAC-Accredited Multi Specialty Benefit Utilization Management company that provides evidence based solutions to ensure payers, their network providers and their beneficiaries receive appropriate and cost-effective care. We reduce redundant or unnecessary procedures, testing and specialty referrals thus improving care and decreasing delays in treatment. Care to Care’s proprietary guidelines are the most advanced in the industry continuously updated by small, focused teams of board certified physicians. We are agile, efficient, and focused on excellence, building the industry’s best programs with the most talented thought leaders.

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