Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group CARIN

Spain

Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group CARIN

Spain
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Gomez M.,Autonomous University of Barcelona | Gomez M.,IMIM Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute | Vila J.,IMIM Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute | Vila J.,Cardiovascular and Genetic Epidemiology Research Group EGEC | And 20 more authors.
Atherosclerosis | Year: 2014

Objectives: To assess 1) the association of lipid oxidation biomarkers with 10-year coronary artery disease (CAD) events and subclinical atherosclerosis, and 2) the reclassification capacity of these biomarkers over Framingham-derived CAD risk functions, in a general population. Methods: Within the framework of the REGICOR study, 4782 individuals aged between 25 and 74 years were recruited in a population-based cohort study. Follow-up of the 4042 who met the eligibility criteria was carried out. Plasma, circulating oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and oxLDL antibodies (OLAB) were measured in a random sample of 2793 participants.End-points included fatal and non-fatal acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and angina. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in the highest quintile and ankle-brachial index <0.9 were considered indicators of subclinical atherosclerosis. Results: Mean age was 50.0 (13.4) years, and 52.4% were women. There were 103 CAD events (34 myocardial infarction, 43 angina, 26 coronary deaths), and 306 subclinical atherosclerosis cases. Oxidized LDL was independently associated with higher incidence of CAD events (HR=1.70; 95% Confidence Interval: 1.02-2.84), but not with subclinical atherosclerosis. The net classification index of the Framingham-derived CAD risk function was significantly improved when ox-LDL was included (NRI=14.67% [4.90; 24.45], P=0.003). No associations were found between OLAB and clinical or subclinical events. The reference values for oxLDL and OLAB are also provided (percentiles). Conclusions: OxLDL was independently associated with 10-year CAD events but not subclinical atherosclerosis in a general population, and improved the reclassification capacity of Framingham-derived CAD risk functions. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Martin-Pelaez S.,Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group CARIN | Covas M.I.,Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group CARIN | Covas M.I.,CIBER ISCIII | Fito M.,Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group CARIN | And 3 more authors.
Molecular Nutrition and Food Research | Year: 2013

The Mediterranean diet and consumption of olive oil have been connected in several studies with longevity and a reduced risk of morbidity and mortality. Lifestyle, such as regular physical activity, a healthy diet, and the existing social cohesion in Southern European countries have been recognised as candidate protective factors that may explain the Mediterranean Paradox. Along with some other characteristics of the Mediterranean diet, the use of olive oil as the main source of fat is common in Southern European countries. The benefits of consuming olive oil have been known since antiquity and were traditionally attributed to its high content in oleic acid. However, it is now well established that these effects must also be attributed to the phenolic fraction of olive oil with its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial activities. The mechanisms of these activities are varied and probably interconnected. For some activities of olive oil phenolic compounds, the evidence is already strong enough to enable the legal use of health claims on foods. This review discusses the health effects of olive oil phenols along with the possibilities of communicating these effects on food labels. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Schroder H.,Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group CARIN | Schroder H.,CIBER ISCIII | Gomez S.F.,Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group CARIN | Gomez S.F.,University Pompeu Fabra | And 9 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2016

Background Using a food-based analysis, healthy dietary patterns in adults are more expensive than less healthy ones; studies are needed in youth. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to determine relationships between monetary daily diet cost, diet quality, and parental socioeconomic status. Design and Methods Data were obtained from a representative national sample of 3534 children and young people in Spain, aged 2 to 24 years. Dietary assessment was performed with a 24-hour recall. Mediterranean diet adherence was measured by the KIDMED questionnaire. Average food cost was calculated from official Spanish government data. Monetary daily diet cost was expressed as euros per day (€/d) and euros per day standardized to a 1000kcal diet (€/1000kcal/d). Results Mean monetary daily diet cost was 3.16±1.57€/d (1.56±0.72€/1000kcal/d). Socioeconomic status was positively associated with monetary daily diet cost and diet quality measured by the KIDMED index (€/d and €/1000kcal/d, p<0.019). High Mediterranean diet adherence (KIDMED score 8-12) was 0.71 €/d (0.28€/1000kcal/d) more expensive than low compliance (KIDMED score 0-3). Analysis for nonlinear association between the KIDMED index and monetary daily diet cost per1000kcal showed no further cost increases beyond a KIDMED score of 8 (linear p<0.001; nonlinear p = 0.010). Conclusion Higher monetary daily diet cost is associated with healthy eating in Spanish youth. Higher socioeconomic status is a determinant for higher monetary daily diet cost and quality. © 2016 Schroder et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


PubMed | Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group CARIN
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Molecular nutrition & food research | Year: 2013

The Mediterranean diet and consumption of olive oil have been connected in several studies with longevity and a reduced risk of morbidity and mortality. Lifestyle, such as regular physical activity, a healthy diet, and the existing social cohesion in Southern European countries have been recognised as candidate protective factors that may explain the Mediterranean Paradox. Along with some other characteristics of the Mediterranean diet, the use of olive oil as the main source of fat is common in Southern European countries. The benefits of consuming olive oil have been known since antiquity and were traditionally attributed to its high content in oleic acid. However, it is now well established that these effects must also be attributed to the phenolic fraction of olive oil with its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial activities. The mechanisms of these activities are varied and probably interconnected. For some activities of olive oil phenolic compounds, the evidence is already strong enough to enable the legal use of health claims on foods. This review discusses the health effects of olive oil phenols along with the possibilities of communicating these effects on food labels.

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