Cardiology Institute

Ẕefat, Israel

Cardiology Institute

Ẕefat, Israel
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Redheuil A.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | Redheuil A.,ICAN Imaging Core Laboratory | Redheuil A.,Cardiology Institute | Wu C.O.,U.S. National Institutes of Health | And 10 more authors.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology | Year: 2014

Background The predictive value of ascending aortic distensibility (AAD) for mortality and hard cardiovascular disease (CVD) events has not been fully established.Objectives This study sought to assess the utility of AAD to predict mortality and incident CVD events beyond conventional risk factors in MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis).Methods AAD was measured with magnetic resonance imaging at baseline in 3,675 MESA participants free of overt CVD. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to evaluate risk of death, heart failure (HF), and incident CVD in relation to AAD, CVD risk factors, indexes of subclinical atherosclerosis, and Framingham risk score.Results There were 246 deaths, 171 hard CVD events (myocardial infarction, resuscitated cardiac arrest, stroke and CV death), and 88 HF events over a median 8.5-year follow-up. Decreased AAD was associated with increased all-cause mortality with a hazard ratio (HR) for the first versus fifth quintile of AAD of 2.7 (p = 0.008) independent of age, sex, ethnicity, other CVD risk factors, and indexes of subclinical atherosclerosis. Overall, patients with the lowest AAD had an independent 2-fold higher risk of hard CVD events. Decreased AAD was associated with CV events in low to intermediate- CVD risk individuals with an HR for the first quintile of AAD of 5.3 (p = 0.03) as well as with incident HF but not after full adjustment.Conclusions Decreased proximal aorta distensibility significantly predicted all-cause mortality and hard CV events among individuals without overt CVD. AAD may help refine risk stratification, especially among asymptomatic, low- to intermediate-risk individuals. © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation.


PubMed | Hitit University, Bülent Ecevit University, Mersin State Hospital, Atatürk University and 32 more.
Type: Clinical Trial | Journal: Turk Kardiyoloji Dernegi arsivi : Turk Kardiyoloji Derneginin yayin organidir | Year: 2015

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the most common causes of preventable ischemic stroke and is related to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. There is a lack of data in Turkey on the use of new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), and time in therapeutic INR range (TTR) in vitamin K antagonist users and AF management modality. In this multi-center trial, we aimed to analyze, follow and evaluate the epidemiological data in non-valvular AF patients.Four thousand one hundred consecutive adult patients from 42 centers with at least one AF attack identified on electrocardiography will be included in the study. Patients with rheumatic mitral valve stenosis and prosthetic valve disease will be excluded from the study. At the end of one year, the patients will be evaluated in terms of major cardiac end points (death, transient ischemic attack, stroke, systemic thromboembolism, major bleeding and hospitalization).First results are expected in June 2015. Data about major cardiovascular end-points will be available in January 2016.The rates and kind of oral anticoagulant use, TTR in vitamin K antagonist users and main management modality applied in non-valvular AF patients will be determined by AFTER-2 study. In addition, the rate of major adverse events (MACEs) and the independent predictors of these MACEs will be detected (AFTER-2 Study ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02354456.).


Paez D.,International Atomic Energy Agency | Orellana P.,University of Santiago de Chile | Gutierrez C.,Cardiology Institute | Ramirez R.,International Atomic Energy Agency | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Nuclear Medicine | Year: 2015

The practice of nuclear medicine (NM) in the Latin American and Caribbean region has experienced important growth in the last decade. However, there is great heterogeneity among countries regarding the availability of technology and human resources. According to data collected through June 2014 by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the total number of ã cameras in the region is 1,231, with an average of 2.16 per million inhabitants. Over 90% of the equipment is SPECT cameras; 7.6% of which have hybrid technology. There are 161 operating PET or PET/CT cameras in 12 member states, representing a rate of 0.3 per million people. Most NM centers belong to the private health system and are in capitals or major cities. Only 4 countries have the capability of assembling 99Mo-99mTc generators, and 2 countries produce 99mTc from nuclear reactors. Cold kits are produced in some countries, and therapeutic agents are mostly imported from outside the region. There are 35 operative cyclotrons. In relation to human resources: there is 1 physician per ã camera, 1.6 technologists per ã camera, 0.1 medical physicist per center, and approximately 0.1 radiochemist or radiopharmacist per center. Nearly 94% of the procedures are diagnostic. PET studies represent about 4%of the total. The future of NM in the Latin American and Caribbean region is promising, with great potential and possibilities. Some of the most important factors driving the region toward greater homogeneity in the availability and application of NM, and bridging the gaps between countries, are clinician awareness of the importance of NM in managing diseases prevalent in the region, increased building of capacity, continuous and strong support from international organizations such as the IAEA through national and regional projects, and strong public-private partnerships and government commitment. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.


PubMed | International Atomic Energy Agency, Cardiology Institute, Nuclear Medicine Service, University of Santiago de Chile and Clinical Research Laboratory
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine | Year: 2015

The practice of nuclear medicine (NM) in the Latin American and Caribbean region has experienced important growth in the last decade. However, there is great heterogeneity among countries regarding the availability of technology and human resources. According to data collected through June 2014 by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the total number of cameras in the region is 1,231, with an average of 2.16 per million inhabitants. Over 90% of the equipment is SPECT cameras; 7.6% of which have hybrid technology. There are 161 operating PET or PET/CT cameras in 12 member states, representing a rate of 0.3 per million people. Most NM centers belong to the private health system and are in capitals or major cities. Only 4 countries have the capability of assembling 99Mo-99mTc generators, and 2 countries produce 99mTc from nuclear reactors. Cold kits are produced in some countries, and therapeutic agents are mostly imported from outside the region. There are 35 operative cyclotrons. In relation to human resources: there is 1 physician per camera, 1.6 technologists per camera, 0.1 medical physicist per center, and approximately 0.1 radiochemist or radiopharmacist per center. Nearly 94% of the procedures are diagnostic. PET studies represent about 4% of the total. The future of NM in the Latin American and Caribbean region is promising, with great potential and possibilities. Some of the most important factors driving the region toward greater homogeneity in the availability and application of NM, and bridging the gaps between countries, are clinician awareness of the importance of NM in managing diseases prevalent in the region, increased building of capacity, continuous and strong support from international organizations such as the IAEA through national and regional projects, and strong public-private partnerships and government commitment.


PubMed | Quanta Diagnostico e Terapia, University of Santiago de Chile, Nuclear Medicine Service, International Atomic Energy Agency and 2 more.
Type: | Journal: Journal of nuclear cardiology : official publication of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology | Year: 2016

The burden of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in the world is ever growing. They represent the first cause of death worldwide and in Latin America. Nuclear cardiology has a well-established role in the management of patient with CVDs and is being increasingly integrated into the healthcare systems in the region. However, there remains variability as to the infrastructure available across the countries, in terms of existing technology, radiopharmaceuticals, and human resources. The approximate number of gamma () cameras in the region is 1348, with an average of 2.25 per million population; Argentina and Brazil having the largest number. Nearly 80% of the existing cameras are single-photon emission tomography (SPECT), of which 8% are hybrid SPECT-CT systems. Positron emission tomography technology is steadily increasing, and currently, there is an average of 0.25 scanners per million inhabitants, indicating that there is a potential to expand the capacities in order to cover the needs. Four countries have nuclear reactors for research purposes, which allow the production of technetium-99m (Argentina, Chile, Mexico and Peru), while four (Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, and Mexico) assemble


Hjouj M.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem | Last D.,The Advanced Technology Center | Guez D.,The Advanced Technology Center | Daniels D.,The Advanced Technology Center | And 5 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

Electroporation, is known to induce cell membrane permeabilization in the reversible (RE) mode and cell death in the irreversible (IRE) mode. Using an experimental system designed to produce a continuum of IRE followed by RE around a single electrode we used MRI to study the effects of electroporation on the brain. Fifty-four rats were injected with Gd-DOTA and treated with a G25 electrode implanted 5.5 mm deep into the striata. MRI was acquired immediately after treatment, 10 min, 20 min, 30 min, and up to three weeks following the treatment using: T1W, T2W, Gradient echo (GE), serial SPGR (DCE-MRI) with flip angles ranging over 5-25°, and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWMRI). Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption was depicted as clear enhancement on T1W images. The average signal intensity in the regions of T1-enhancement, representing BBB disruption, increased from 1887±83 (arbitrary units) immediately post treatment to 2246±94 20 min post treatment, then reached a plateau towards the 30 min scan where it reached 2289±87. DWMRI at 30 min showed no significant effects. Early treatment effects and late irreversible damage were clearly depicted on T2W. The enhancing volume on T2W has increased by an average of 2.27±0.27 in the first 24-48 hours post treatment, suggesting an inflammatory tissue response. The permanent tissue damage, depicted as an enhancing region on T2W, 3 weeks post treatment, decreased to an average of 50±10% of the T2W enhancing volumes on the day of the treatment which was 33±5% of the BBB disruption volume. Permanent tissue damage was significantly smaller than the volume of BBB disruption, suggesting, that BBB disruption is associated with RE while tissue damage with IRE. These results demonstrate the feasibility of applying reversible and irreversible electroporation for transient BBB disruption or permanent damage, respectively, and applying MRI for planning/monitoring disruption volume/shape by optimizing electrode positions and treatment parameters. © 2012 Hjouj et al.


Brzosko S.,Medical University of Bialystok | Hryszko T.,Medical University of Bialystok | Klopotowski M.,Cardiology Institute | Mysliwiec M.,Medical University of Bialystok
Archives of Medical Science | Year: 2013

Introduction: Malnutrition is a negative predictive factor for survival in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Coincidence of malnutrition, inflammation and atherosclerosis (MIA syndrome) in the dialysis population is an exceptionally poor outcome event. Due to flexibility, ease of performance and reproducibility, clinical scales are of particular value in assessment of nutritional status in ESRD patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical value of Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Material and methods: Nutritional status was assessed in 41 peritoneal dialysis patients by means of the MNA scale and malnutrition inflammation score (MIS). Some other clinical and laboratory parameters associated with nutritional status were analyzed. Patients were followed up for 30 months. Results: In the analyzed group of patients a good nutritional state was diagnosed in 22 patients (54%), risk of malnutrition in 17 (41%) and malnutrition in 2 patients (5%) based on the MNA scale. A strong correlation between MNA based nutritional status and MIS was found (r = -0.85, p < 0.01, ANOVA, p < 0.01). Differences in time on dialysis, body mass index, concentration of albumin, cholesterol and triglycerides were noted between at risk/malnourished and well-nourished (according to MNA) patients. Statistically significant factors determining survival of patients by Cox proportional hazard analysis were age (HR 1.07), being at risk/malnourished according to MNA (HR 5.7), MIS (HR 1.2), and albumin (HR 0.13). Conclusions: The MNA scale is a valuable, clinically suitable tool for assessment of nutritional status in peritoneal dialysis patients. Risk of malnutrition and malnutrition diagnosed by MNA identifies patients at high mortality risk. Copyright © 2013 Termedia & Banach.

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